Healthy Living in the North

Foodie Friday: Tips for great-tasting fish!

Maple Dijon salmon on a plate with vegetable and rice.

There are so many reasons to love salmon! It’s local, heart-healthy, and packed with nutrients! Registered dietitian Amy’s maple Dijon salmon is a great way to enjoy it!

I love salmon! I love that salmon is a local, B.C. food. I love that I can buy salmon at a fish market and know where it comes from. And, if I had the skills to go fishing, I love that I could fish for salmon, too, like many B.C. residents and visitors enjoy doing.

Originally, I come from the Prairies. Along with the fact that my mother had a fish allergy and the fact that we lived over 2,000 km from the nearest coastline, my first real taste of fresh salmon was just three years ago when my husband and I moved to B.C. It was unbelievably delicious! I couldn’t believe I had been missing out all these years!

Why fish?

Did you know that Canada’s Food Guide recommends 2 servings of fish per week for people of all ages? One serving equals around 1/2 cup of fish – or approximately the size and thickness of the palm of your hand.

Fish is an excellent source of protein, is low in saturated fat, and contains omega-3 essential fatty acids and many other nutrients that the body needs.

Omega-3 fats are “essential fats” because they cannot be made in the body and must be provided in the diet. Omega-3 fats:

  • Help with brain, nerve and eye development in infants
  • Can help prevent and treat heart disease
  • May help reduce symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis
  • May help in the prevention of dementia including Alzheimer’s disease

Are you looking to enjoy this healthy and delicious protein? Here are two tips for great tasting fish!

  1. Make sure your fish is fresh. Cook it the same day you buy it or, if it’s frozen, thaw in the fridge overnight and cook the next day. Your fish should not smell “fishy.”
  2. Don’t overcook the fish or it gets dry and tough. If using a pan, fish only needs about 10 minutes per inch. If cooking in the oven, a little more time is needed – about 15 minutes, until it flakes apart with a fork and is fairly firm in the middle.

For more information about cooking fish, I recommend The Fresh Market’s tip & tricks.

Have I sold you on salmon yet? Try it tonight with this maple Dijon salmon recipe! This recipe is simple, easy, and delicious for a weeknight meal but also fancy enough for company. Using maple syrup makes it a very Canadian inspired recipe, too. Enjoy this with a side of brown rice or other whole grain and a hot vegetable or salad.

Maple Dijon Salmon

Ingredients

  • 1 fillet of salmon (1-2 pounds) or 4-6 frozen pieces of plain, unseasoned salmon
  • 1-2 tbsp Dijon mustard (grainy or smooth)
  • 1-2 tbsp maple syrup
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 F. Line a large baking sheet with parchment paper (for easy clean up).
  2. Sprinkle the fish evenly with salt and pepper.
  3. Mix together mustard and maple syrup in a bowl. Spread on top of the salmon, sprinkle with a little more salt and fresh ground pepper if desired! If you have time to let it marinate, let it sit covered in the fridge for 2 hours, but this isn’t necessary.
  4. Bake in preheated oven for about 15-20 minutes, depending on how thick the fish fillets are. You want your fish flaky but not tough.
Amy Horrock

About Amy Horrock

Born and raised in Winnipeg Manitoba, Amy Horrock is a registered dietitian and member of the Regional Dysphagia Management Team. She loves cooking, blogging, and spreading the joy of healthy eating to others! Outside of the kitchen, this prairie girl can be found crocheting, reading, or exploring the natural splendor and soaring heights of British Columbia with her husband!

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Foodie Friday: Pulses, lycopene, and the black bean salsa that ties them all together!

Salsa ingredients on a cutting board

With fibre from black beans and lycopene from tomatoes, this black bean salsa is easy to make and packs a nutritional punch!

Have you ever tried black bean salsa? Don’t be scared away! It’s just like normal salsa, but it has black beans in it! It’s a deliciously sneaky way to add more fibre, protein and pulses to your diet!

You may have read a lot from my fellow dietitians about pulses during Foodie Fridays this year. Why’s that? Because the United Nations declared 2016 the International Year of Pulses! The goal is to increase awareness of the nutritional benefits and how pulses are an important part of a sustainable food system. Learn more from the United Nations’ Food and Agriculture Organization.

What is a “pulse” anyway? Are they good for you?

Pulses are a family of plants including:

  • Dried peas (think split pea soup)
  • Dry beans (think pork and beans – like the ones you take camping)
  • Lentils (small disc shapes you might see in soups or stews)
  • Chickpeas (think hummus)

Things you may know:

  • Pulses are high in fibre! This helps with regularity, keeping you feeling full longer. Many Canadians are not getting the recommended amounts of fibre in each day. The recommended daily intake of fibre is 38 g/day of total fibre for men and 25 g/day of total fibre for women.
  • Pulses are a good source of protein! This makes them a great plant-based alternative to meat or animal products.

Things you may not know:

  • Pulses have a low glycemic index, meaning that they are digested and absorbed slowly in the body and help to keep blood sugar levels more stable.
  • Pulses can help lower LDL (“bad”) cholesterol in the body because they contain soluble fibre.
  • Pulses use half the non-renewable energy inputs of other crops and have a low carbon footprint! Pulse Canada has more information about pulses and sustainability.

Information above based off of Pulse Canada.

Tomatoes and lycopene

Let’s also talk tomatoes. Garden tomatoes in season taste fantastic (like they should taste), but store-bought ones out of season often taste and look bland. The key to any recipe is fresh ingredients! In the winter and spring, I prefer to use canned tomato products because they are harvested and preserved at the peak of ripeness. Also, did you know that the heating process involved in canning tomatoes increases the amount of lycopene in tomatoes by about 7 times?

Lycopene is an antioxidant that is strongly linked to preventing cancer! Lycopene is particularly well known for the protective effects it has against prostate cancer. Tomatoes are by far the winner when it comes to lycopene content of food so consider canned tomato products a nutritious option.

Information above based off of the Canadian Nutrient Files.

Bowl of salsa

Black bean salsa is a great way to sneak some pulses into your menu!

Black Bean Salsa

Recipe sourced from: Dietitians of Canada Cookbook, Simply Great Food, by Patricia Chuey, Eileen Campbell and Mary Sue Waisman.

Makes enough to feed a crowd.

Salsa recipe ideas:

  • Serve this salsa with lettuce and veggies, avocado, chopped cooked chicken, and corn for a simple Mexican salad.
  • Top your favourite burrito or taco filling with this salsa for a high fibre punch.
  • Add salsa to scrambled or poached eggs and serve on toast for a quick breakfast, lunch or dinner.
  • Spoon salsa over white fish or chicken before baking in the oven.

Ingredients

  • 3 cups tomatoes, diced (if in season) or 750 mL can of diced tomatoes
  • 1 small red onion, finely minced
  • 1 jalapeno, ribs and seeds removed, minced (optional)
  • 1 can of black beans, rinsed
  • ½ cup chopped cilantro (optional if you aren’t a cilantro fan)
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • ½ tsp salt
  • Juice of 2 limes

Instructions

  1. Chop tomatoes, if using, or empty canned tomatoes into a large bowl. You can drain the extra juice if you like your salsa more chunky than wet.
  2. Mince onion, jalapeno and cilantro and add to the tomatoes.
  3. Rinse black beans and add to the salsa.
  4. Add olive oil, salt and freshly squeezed lime juice. Stir well to combine.
  5. Cover and refrigerate for at least 2 hours or overnight. Enjoy!
Amy Horrock

About Amy Horrock

Born and raised in Winnipeg Manitoba, Amy Horrock is a registered dietitian and member of the Regional Dysphagia Management Team. She loves cooking, blogging, and spreading the joy of healthy eating to others! Outside of the kitchen, this prairie girl can be found crocheting, reading, or exploring the natural splendor and soaring heights of British Columbia with her husband!

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Foodie Friday: Holiday pecan pie balls

It’s that festive time of year! A time for anticipation, socializing, giving and joy! It’s also a time to dust off the recipe box to create some of your favourite dishes for your friends and family as many traditions are based around food!

Maybe you’ve been invited to different gatherings over the next few weeks – office parties, gatherings with friends, and family dinners. Do you have an old stand-by recipe that you bring to these get-togethers? Or are you looking for something new and exciting? Or maybe you’re short on time? Have no fear! Try this super easy and fast recipe that has only three ingredients! And believe me, it will impress.

Rolled balls on a plate.

Pecans, dates, and vanilla are all you need for this holiday treat that packs a nutritional punch! Try them today!

How does this recipe compare to other baking? Well like with any sweet treat, a couple of these balls will do. But nutritionally, these little balls are powerhouses!

  • Pecans are a great source of healthy fats that are great for the heart, vitamin E which helps prevent disease, and a whole bunch of other vitamins and minerals that promote health. (Not to mention they are also delicious!) When you roast pecans in the oven, the flavour they develop tastes amazing.
  • Medjool dates are moist, sweet and meaty fruits that are gooey and delicious. Dates are a great source of fibre, potassium and antioxidants, all of which help keep the body running the way it’s meant to run! Look for them in the produce section in a square container.

This recipe is allergen-free except for nuts.

Holiday Pecan Pie Balls

Makes about 12-14 one-inch balls.

Ingredients

  • 1 cup Medjool dates, pits removed
  • 1 cup toasted pecans
  • 1/8 tsp salt (optional)
  • 1/2 tsp pure vanilla extract

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 F. Spread pecans on a baking sheet and bake in the oven for about 5-7 minutes or until toasted in colour and smelling fragrant. Watch them carefully because they burn very quickly! Let cool for 5 minutes.
  2. Remove pits from the date by making a cut down the side with a sharp knife. The long pit will come out easily.
  3. Place dates, pecans, salt (if using), and vanilla in a food processor. Pulse until fairly smooth.
  4. Pinch a small amount out of the bowl and roll between clean hands to form a ball.
  5. Store in the fridge until ready to serve! Enjoy!
Amy Horrock

About Amy Horrock

Born and raised in Winnipeg Manitoba, Amy Horrock is a registered dietitian and member of the Regional Dysphagia Management Team. She loves cooking, blogging, and spreading the joy of healthy eating to others! Outside of the kitchen, this prairie girl can be found crocheting, reading, or exploring the natural splendor and soaring heights of British Columbia with her husband!

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Foodie Friday: Keep cool this summer with homemade frozen treats

Strawberry ice pop on a plate with strawberries

Foods you make in your kitchen are going to be more nutritious (and delicious!) than the store-bought alternative. This summer, try making your own ice pops with your favourite fruit!

What a wonderful summer it has been in northern B.C.! How are you keeping cool this summer? Heading to the beach? Jumping in the pool? Enjoying a refreshing treat?

Kids love ice pops and frozen treats. They sure do hit the spot on a hot day! Have you ever tried making your own? They take only a few minutes to make and are guaranteed to be a hit! Ice pops are a fun and creative way for kids to get more fluids in the hot summer months.

Foods you make in your kitchen are going to be more nutritious (and delicious!) than the store-bought alternative. This rule applies for Popsicles and icy treats as well. The cost savings can be significant and you know exactly what ingredients are in there! It’s even better if you are able to use locally grown ingredients such as fresh B.C. fruit.

All you need are some ice pop moulds and a freezer! These moulds can be found among all the festive summer plates and glasses for under $5 at your local dollar store or larger grocery store. If you can’t find any, you can also use ice cube trays and cut pieces of firm drinking straws to use as handles.

When you have your own ice pop moulds, you can freeze whatever you like! Here are just a few ideas:

  • Blend up juicy watermelon with a squeeze of lime juice
  • Purée ripe peaches, nectarines or strawberries with a splash of water
  • Freeze your favourite smoothie. Try berries, milk, and Greek yogurt!
  • Throw some crushed raspberries or other berries into the moulds with diluted pineapple or orange juice

Here is a super easy strawberry ice cream inspired treat that is made with coconut milk, instead. The coconut milk makes this really rich, creamy and delicious.

The recipe below makes enough for twelve ¼ cup-sized ice pops (as seen in the picture) or six ½ cup ice pops.

Ingredients:

  • 1 ½ cup strawberries, washed, core removed and chopped
  • 1 tbsp fresh lemon juice (optional)
  • 1 can of regular coconut milk
  • 2-4 tbsp maple syrup or honey

Instructions:

  1. Wash and prepare the strawberries. Place in blender.
  2. Squeeze fresh lemon juice over strawberries, careful not to add any seeds.
  3. Add the coconut milk and maple syrup or honey to the blender.
  4. Blend together until smooth.
  5. Pour smooth mixture into ice pop moulds, snap on the lids. Remember that if you don’t have ice pop moulds, you can use ice cube trays and firm straws.
  6. Freeze for at least 3-4 hours, until solid.
  7. When ready to eat, run under hot water for 10 seconds to easily remove the ice pop from the mould.
Amy Horrock

About Amy Horrock

Born and raised in Winnipeg Manitoba, Amy Horrock is a registered dietitian and member of the Regional Dysphagia Management Team. She loves cooking, blogging, and spreading the joy of healthy eating to others! Outside of the kitchen, this prairie girl can be found crocheting, reading, or exploring the natural splendor and soaring heights of British Columbia with her husband!

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Foodie Friday: Spice up your life with herbs!

Fresh mint leaves in tea.

Fresh herbs are easy, healthy, and versatile. Whether it’s fresh mint from the garden or chives from a windowsill pot, spice up your life with fresh herbs this year!

It’s spring time! The air is fresh, the sun is warm again and maybe you are actively thinking about what to plant in your garden or flower pots this year!

Have you ever tried to grow your own herbs?

A wide variety of fresh herbs can be found at any garden centre. Adding herbs to pots on your windowsill or making a big herb variety pot for your patio can be quite cheerful! Plus, this keeps them within reach to help add some flavour to your cooking in an easy way!

Fresh herbs are fragrant, add a different kind of flavour to your cooking than dried, and even have some antioxidants that help fight disease! Using more flavourful ingredients also decreases our tendency to use a lot of salt, which can help keep your blood pressure under control.

Here are 10 of the best herbs to grow fresh and how to use them! Get in the garden and have fun!

1. Basil is an easy to grow plant and can be grown in or out of doors.

  • How to use it: Goes well with Mediterranean foods like tomato sauce and pesto, meat or seafood. Add fresh basil at the end of cooking as the heat ruins most of the flavour.

2. Chives are grown easily and don’t need much light to flourish. They grow well in a container.

  • How to use it: Just snip some off when you need a gentle onion flavour without the bite. Add at the very end to maximize their color and flavour.

3. Cilantro should be planted in full sun and well-drained soil. It needs lots of soil depth due to its root so it will need a deep pot or to be planted in the ground.

  • How to use it: You either love it or hate it! Some people find it “soapy,” but regardless, it’s one of the world’s most popular spices! The bright refreshing flavor is common in Latin and Asian cooking. Cilantro is usually eaten raw, added after a dish has been cooked.

4. Dill grows best in deep, loose soil.

  • How to use it: This aromatic herb goes with salmon, borscht or other stews and a variety of vegetables (especially carrots and cucumbers).

5. Mint need to be watched as this easy-to-grow herb will quickly take over your flower bed if you let it! Plant mint in its own planter or raised box to keep it contained.

  • How to use it: In sweet desserts as well as savoury dishes from the Middle East and North Africa. Fresh mint is perfect for summer-fresh salads, to liven up a sauce, or to brew fragrant teas.

6. Oregano loves sunlight so make sure it gets lots for optimal flavour.

  • How to use it: This pungent herb is primarily found in Mediterranean and Mexican cuisines. Add it into soups or stews as well.

7. Parsley needs moist soil. Don’t let it dry out or it will wilt and won’t want to spring back.

  • How to use it: This versatile spice is great in pasta dishes, sprinkled on fish and chicken, or added to potatoes. It’s one of the most common and versatile herbs used in Western cooking. Flat-leaf or Italian parsley has the best texture and flavour for cooking.

8. Rosemary likes full sunlight, well-drained soil, and frequent watering.

  • How to use it: Its woodsy flavour works well with a variety of roasted or barbecued meats (like chicken, pork and salmon) or mixed into sauces for a more subtle taste. It also blends with tomatoes, spinach, and mushrooms. Because the flavour is strong, it’s best to add rosemary sparingly at first and more if needed.

9. Sage likes plenty of sunlight, good soil, and watering every other day.

  • How to use it: With a slightly peppery flavour, sage is great with sweet fruits and veggies like apples and squash, but it also adds a punch to poultry dishes, potatoes or cheese. Don’t worry about overcooking as this powerful spice’s flavour holds up well when cooked for long periods of time.

10. Thyme likes lots of sunlight.

  • How to use it: One of the most popular herbs in American and European cooking, thyme can be paired with nearly any kind of meat, poultry, fish, beans, eggs or vegetable. To use fresh thyme, peel off as many of the leaves as you can from the woody stem by running your fingers along the stem.

Fresh brewed mint tea

Ingredients:

  • Fresh mint

Instructions:

  1. Snip off a few leaves of mint from your plant. Alternatively, you can dry your mint leaves in the fall and use them the same way.
  2. Pour boiling water over leaves and allow flavour to infuse for about 3-5 minutes or until desired strength has been reached.

Enjoy!

References:

Food Network Guide to Fresh Herbs

Amy Horrock

About Amy Horrock

Born and raised in Winnipeg Manitoba, Amy Horrock is a registered dietitian and member of the Regional Dysphagia Management Team. She loves cooking, blogging, and spreading the joy of healthy eating to others! Outside of the kitchen, this prairie girl can be found crocheting, reading, or exploring the natural splendor and soaring heights of British Columbia with her husband!

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Don’t be a sumo wrestler – eat breakfast!

French toast with maple syrup

Your body needs fuel to run properly! A balanced breakfast is key to having a productive day!

This blog post is one in a series of posts giving you the tools you need to complete the month-long Eating 9 to 5 challenge! Visit the contest page for your chance to win great weekly prizes and the grand prize of a Vitamix blender! 


Have you ever wondered how sumo wrestlers gain all that weight? They do something that isn’t common in that culture: they skip breakfast!

Yes, that’s right. Sumo wrestlers get up at 5:00 a.m. and train all morning without eating. This purposely keeps their metabolism running slowly. By the afternoon, they are ravenously hungry and then spend the remainder of the day eating and napping.

Sound familiar?

Some people think that skipping breakfast can help them eat fewer calories and lose weight but the opposite is usually true! People who skip breakfast often find their appetite returns with a vengeance later in the day and they overeat as a result. Eating breakfast is one of the best habits for a healthy lifestyle!

Did you know that almost 40% of Canadians skip breakfast?

That’s a lot of people missing out on some important benefits! Eating breakfast is linked to better intake of calcium, vitamin D, potassium and fibre! This is because foods typically eaten in the morning are usually high in these important nutrients.

How do you feel when you skip your morning meal?

Your body needs gas to run properly! By skipping breakfast, your body and brain will be running off of fumes. What does this look like at work? A foggy brain in your morning meeting, being irritable with your co-workers because you are “hangry”, making mistakes due to poor concentration, or even trying to stimulate your brain with multiple cups of coffee when it’s actually craving nourishment!

Stayed tuned to the Northern Health Matters blog for more great breakfast tips all week!

In the meantime, check out this two ingredient recipe for french toast!

Quick and easy french toast

Serves one

Did you know that traditionally, french toast is made with day old, slightly stale bread? The eggs and heat help fluff it back up and make it palatable again. This method also lends itself well to gluten-free bread which tends to taste stale or dry when it is not toasted or warmed.

Serve your french toast with some fresh, frozen or canned fruit and a glass of milk for a balanced and brain-boosting breakfast!

Ingredients:

  • 2 slices of whole grain bread (gluten-free or regular)
  • 1 egg, beaten
  • Dash of vanilla (optional)

Instructions:

  1. Beat egg in a wide dish like a casserole dish or a pasta bowl. Add a dash of vanilla.
  2. Place slices of bread in the egg. Turn to coat until all the egg is absorbed.
  3. Heat a little oil or margarine in a pan over medium heat. Add bread and cook on each side until browned.

Serve with two teaspoons of maple syrup!


Northern Health’s nutrition team has created these blog posts to promote healthy eating, celebrate Nutrition Month, and give you the tools you need to complete the Eating 9 to 5 challenge! Visit the contest page and complete weekly themed challenges for great prizes including cookbooks, lunch bags, and a Vitamix blender!

Amy Horrock

About Amy Horrock

Born and raised in Winnipeg Manitoba, Amy Horrock is a registered dietitian and member of the Regional Dysphagia Management Team. She loves cooking, blogging, and spreading the joy of healthy eating to others! Outside of the kitchen, this prairie girl can be found crocheting, reading, or exploring the natural splendor and soaring heights of British Columbia with her husband!

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Foodie Friday: What’s your New Year’s resolution?

Carrot cake baked oatmeal in a casserole dish.

Try some healthy changes this year: Eat breakfast everyday, drink water, cook healthy meals, and add fruits and vegetables to meals and snacks. Drink a glass of water along with Amy’s carrot cake oatmeal recipe and you’ve hit all four objectives at once!

Have you made a New Year’s resolution this year? Above all the typical ones like saving money, spending more time with your family, and quitting smoking, the resolution that consistently tops the list seems to be losing weight.

In terms of setting a goal, dietitians encourage people to focus on healthy behaviours instead of just on weight loss, ensuring that a person is as healthy as possible at any size. Consider the big difference between these two plans:

  • A supplement-based or one-food diet program (e.g., Slim Fast, Herbal Magic, or the cabbage soup diet) that may provide short term weight loss results but will end with weight gain once you stop the program. This kind of weight cycling has negative outcomes for your physical or mental health.
  • A lifestyle behaviour based approach which encourages healthy habits that improve many aspects of your life aside from the shape of your body. Starting a special program isn’t necessary but focusing on long-term changes to your habits is. By eating a variety of nutritious foods, drinking water, exercising, and adopting other healthy behaviours your body may respond with a huge number of benefits including increased energy, improved mood, lower blood cholesterol levels, and improved sleep!

Consider some of these tips for healthy changes in 2015:

  1. Eat breakfast everyday! Did you know that sumo wrestlers consciously skip breakfast in order to gain weight? Eating in the morning jumpstarts your metabolism, puts gas in your tank to fuel your day, and keeps you from being ravenous at the end of the day.
  2. Drink 2-3 litres of water per day! Water flushes your body of toxins, keeps your brain functioning well, hydrates and revitalizes your skin, and keeps your gut working optimally. Your urine should look pale yellow.
  3. Add more vegetables and fruit to meals and snacks! Add fruit to your oatmeal, sneak veggies into your sandwiches, soups, stews, and casseroles, keep frozen berries and bananas on hand for easy smoothies, and stock your freezer with frozen vegetables for a quick dinner solution.
  4. Cook healthy meals for your family! Anything you make in your kitchen will be more nutritious than the store-bought version! Make cooking a priority for your family.

Looking for a family-friendly recipe that gets everyone running to the breakfast table and sneaks some vegetables into an unlikely place? Look no further!

Carrot cake oatmeal can be made for a nice brunch or weekend breakfast, heated up for a quick breakfast during the week, packed along as snack, or even eaten as a dessert!

This recipe includes an ingredient from every food group: whole grain oats, carrots and raisins, milk or a milk substitute, and seeds and nuts!

Carrot Cake Baked Oatmeal

This recipe is based off of a recipe from the website Oh She Glows.

Feeds six hungry people

Ingredients:

  • 2 ¼ cups quick cooking rolled oats (use gluten-free if necessary)
  • ¼ cup ground flaxseed or chia seeds (optional)
  • 1 ½ tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1 ½ tsp baking powder
  • ¼ tsp salt
  • 1 ½ cups lightly packed shredded carrots
  • 2 ½ cups unsweetened milk (or milk alternative of your choice)
  • 1/3 cup pure maple syrup, melted honey, or brown sugar
  • 2 tsp pure vanilla extract
  • 1 ½ tsp freshly grated ginger (or ½ tsp ground ginger)
  • ¼ cup raisins
  • ½ cup sunflower seeds or walnuts

Instructions:

  1. Preheat oven to 375F and lightly grease a 10-cup casserole dish.
  2. In a large bowl, mix together the rolled oats, flaxseed or chia seeds, cinnamon, baking powder, and salt.
  3. In a medium bowl, whisk together the carrots, milk, sweetener, vanilla, and ginger.
  4. Add the wet mixture to the dry mixture and stir until combined. If you are using regular rolled oats instead of the quick cooking variety, I would recommend that you let it soak for 30-60 minutes or overnight. That way it will be nice and soft!
  5. Pour mixture into prepared dish and smooth out with a spoon. Press down on the oatmeal with a spoon (or your hands) so the oats sink into the milk. Sprinkle on the raisins and sunflower seeds or walnuts and press down lightly again.
  6. Bake, uncovered, for 32-37 minutes or until lightly golden along edge. The oatmeal will still look a bit soft or wet in some spots when it comes out of the oven, but it will firm up as it cools.
  7. Let cool for about 10 minutes before serving. Garnish with a drizzle of maple syrup or some dairy or non-dairy yogurt. When the baked oatmeal is fully cool, it will firm up enough to be sliced into squares.

Enjoy it warm, at room temperature, or chilled straight from the fridge!

Amy Horrock

About Amy Horrock

Born and raised in Winnipeg Manitoba, Amy Horrock is a registered dietitian and member of the Regional Dysphagia Management Team. She loves cooking, blogging, and spreading the joy of healthy eating to others! Outside of the kitchen, this prairie girl can be found crocheting, reading, or exploring the natural splendor and soaring heights of British Columbia with her husband!

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Crave-worthy Kale with Cashew Cream!

A dark green kale salad with a cashew cream dressing is on a white plate.

This salad is sure to make a kale fan out of even the harshest kale-haters!

You’ve probably seen kale in the spotlight over the past few years with claims that it has nutritional super powers. Are you wondering what all the hype is about?

Kale is often labelled a “super food” because it’s full of good stuff for your body, like vitamins, minerals, and disease fighting anti-oxidants.

Some interesting facts about kale:

  • The calcium it contains is better absorbed than milk! Four-and-a-half cups of raw kale actually provide more calcium than a glass of milk! Kale packs in 435 mg. of calcium vs 322 mg. in one cup of milk. Considering kale wilts down quite a bit when it’s steamed, that’s actually not that much volume.
  • Four-and-a-half cups of raw kale has 10 grams of protein – the same as a standard serving of meat! Plus, it has more iron than steak and a fraction of the calories!
  • Gram for gram, kale has twice the amount of vitamin C than oranges!

This recipe appears on my menu plan at least once a month at home. It’s delicious with baked salmon and brown rice! I have converted non-kale eaters into kale-lovers with it on more than one occasion – my father-in-law even had seconds!

Cashew cream is a super easy, simple, and a delicious non-dairy form of “cream.” It has healthy satisfying fats for your heart and is great for people who are avoiding milk due to intolerance or allergy!

Steamed Kale with Cashew Cream
(serves 4)

Ingredients:

  • 1 large bunch of kale, washed well
  • 1/2 cup cashews, unsalted and roasted (use sun flower seeds instead if you are worried about nut allergies) *
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 1 tsp onion powder (or garlic powder)

Directions:

  1. Wash the kale. Holding the tough stalk in your hand, run your hand up the stem to rip off the leaves. This will leave the tough part behind, discard. Rip the leaves into bite sized pieces.
  2. Prepare a pot with 1 inch of water at the bottom. Place a steamer inside the pot and add the ripped leaves. Steam kale over simmering water for about 15 minutes or until tender.
  3. While the kale is steaming, prepare the cashew cream. Add the cashews, water and onion powder into the blender. Blend for about 1 minute or until smooth and creamy. Scrape down the sides as needed.
  4. Once kale is done, place in a large bowl and coat with cashew cream!

*Optional: For a really smooth cashew cream, soak the cashews in water for about 4 hours or during the day, drain before adding a fresh ½ cup of water. They will bulk up in size and blend nicely. Sunflower seeds should be soaked prior to blending.

What are some of the ways that you use kale?

Amy Horrock

About Amy Horrock

Born and raised in Winnipeg Manitoba, Amy Horrock is a registered dietitian and member of the Regional Dysphagia Management Team. She loves cooking, blogging, and spreading the joy of healthy eating to others! Outside of the kitchen, this prairie girl can be found crocheting, reading, or exploring the natural splendor and soaring heights of British Columbia with her husband!

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