Healthy Living in the North

Children: keeping them safe from falls and injury-free

Kathy and grandson

Kathy spending time with her grandson.

Children – those active little beings designed to move, explore, interact with the environment, challenge our thinking and delight our senses. It’s a big responsibility keeping them safe from falls and injury-free.  This is especially true during the early years when their curiosity, coupled with their level of development, can put them in vulnerable situations that can lead to injury, at home, at the playground and at child care.

Reflecting back as a parent of three daughters, I wanted nothing more than to keep my girls safe from harm. This included: preparing our home, keeping curtain cords up high and out of reach, securing shelving units to walls, ensuring all hazardous products were inaccessible, and lowering the hot water temperature to 49 degrees Celsius. I thought I had it covered; my little home was safe. Then the unthinkable happened. My two-year-old daughter pulled out the drawers in the kitchen, used them as a ladder, scampered onto the counter and somehow tumbled off, resulting in a serious fall.

According to the Healthy Canadians website, every day two Canadian children die from unintentional injuries and another 80 require hospitalization. These are staggering statistics considering many injuries could have been avoided had better preventive steps been taken.

In my case, I was close by and a fall still happened. What had I missed?

Preventing falls involves a combination of safe environments along with active supervision. Active supervision, or the level of supervision that a child requires, will change depending on their age, physical health, social skills and risk-taking behaviors. In general, active supervision means being within sight and reach at all times, paying close attention and anticipating hazards when your child is playing or exploring.

As a Licensing Officer for Northern Health, monitoring licensed child care facilities, I see first-hand the importance of being proactive and thinking ahead when it comes to safety and preventing falls. Children attending child care programs need opportunities to be physically active, to practice new motor skills, to play freely and to explore. Falls prevention strategies are not meant to take away physical activity, but to create a safe environment in which physical activity can take place.  Active supervision is also important in child care settings. By watching closely, child care providers can offer support, while building on the children’s play experiences, promoting their overall development and ensuring that play is enjoyable. In childcare settings, supervision, together with thoughtful environment design and arrangement, can prevent or reduce the likelihood of accidents and the severity of injury to children.

As the years passed and my girls grew, our actions and focus on safety and falls prevention changed.  We no longer had safety covers on the electrical outlets, hazardous products had found their way back under the sink, fragile decorator accessories were everywhere and the girls were allowed freedom away from mom’s watchful eyes. Today, I now have four active, little grand boys visiting on a regular basis. I find myself thinking of that terrible moment when my daughter fell, my responsibility as a grandparent and the actions I can take to ensure a safe environment for them.

Injuries can be devastating; we were lucky.  My daughter recovered from her fall and it taught me a valuable lesson – I can take steps to prevent the ones I care for from being injured.

Visit our Falls Prevention page for more information.

Enter the Falls Across the Ages contest to win prizes!

Kathy Basaraba

About Kathy Basaraba

Kathy is a Licensing Officer with Public Health Protection out of the Prince George office. In her role as a licensing officer, she monitors and inspects licensed childcare facilities to ensure the health, safety and well-being of children in care. Although she has lived in northern communities for most of her adult life, she is still adjusting to the cold and snow. When not at work she can be found at home, spending quality time with her family and friends.

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