Healthy Living in the North

Bright ideas for conservation from Northern Health

After reviewing the survey that I shared with you on Earth Day yesterday, I learned just how committed Northern Health staff are to energy conservation! It was great to see the number and diversity of responses from all over the Northern Health region.

To move this passion into action, I recently put out a call to staff in the northwest region for “bright ideas” – any suggestions that they had for conservation improvements. The breadth and depth of ideas that we received was truly impressive and we thank everyone who participated for contributing! Staff in the northwest had some great ideas that I wanted to share to inspire your own conservation thinking! How might you conserve energy in your home or workplace?

Pie chart of survey results

The “Bright Ideas” for conservation that Les heard from Northern Health staff represented eight major themes, with ideas for action on lighting, computers, and equipment leading the way.

Here is a summary of the results:

  • 40 total entries
  • 8 major themes: lighting, computers, equipment, heating and cooling (HVAC), water, recycling, laundry and paper

Here is a sample of some of the great ideas that were submitted.

From staff in Dease Lake & Kitimat:

Replacing exterior and street lights with high efficiency LED lights.

It is estimated that lighting makes up about one-third of a typical institution’s energy consumption – think of all those thousands of dollars to save!

From Prince Rupert:

Creating a pod-based recycling system with designated spots for paper recycling and other materials.

A staff member in Houston submitted many ideas including turning off cooking equipment overnight or when not in use in kitchens and creating reminder notes to turn off taps completely to save water.

We heard great ideas from Smithers:

Looking at ways to reduce laundry use when carrying out exams, such as making gowns optional or by request, and sizing sheets to fit exam tables to reduce excess material adding to laundry generated.

Creating reminders and promotions to encourage staff to turn off lights in unused spaces to reduce energy waste.

Staff in Terrace submitted many ideas including reviewing insulation along water pipes, installing insulated foam along all water pipes to conserve energy, and installing programs to log off computers when not in use.

From Kitimat:

On a weekly basis, vacuuming registers and vents to prevent the air flow from being blocked.

From Queen Charlotte City:

Creating a comprehensive strategy to look at resource utilization at facilities focusing on heating, electricity, solid waste and water utilization, and tracking energy data across sites.

And from a staff person in Terrace:

Taking the stairs instead of the elevator to save energy and get exercise.

Stay tuned for more Bright Ideas from other regions – I’ll be launching a northeast contest in June!

Bright Ideas Contest graphic

What is your “Bright Idea” for conservation?

Les Sluggett

About Les Sluggett

Les Sluggett is Northern Health’s energy manager, which sees him supporting facility managers in Northern Health to explore and understand energy conservation through technologies and programs. His efforts help facilities personnel to be more energy efficient so that patients are comfortable in a reliable and safe environment. In his spare time, Les attends his local YMCA or heads outdoors skiing in the winter and canoeing & travelling in the summer. At home as at work, Les tries to reduce waste and be more energy efficient.

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Northern Health staff conserve energy – how about you?

Infographic with survey results.In my role as energy manager, I get to hear all about how Northern Health staff members feel about energy conservation!

Earlier this year, over 1,200 staff members from Haida Gwaii to Valemount responded to an energy conservation survey – a great response that shows just how much we northerners care about energy conservation (97% of respondents thought energy conservation was important) and protecting our beautiful environment!

Here are the top 5 insights I found valuable from the survey:

  • 87% of respondents turn off all lights when possible.
  • 79% of respondents close windows and doors when heating or air conditioning is on.
  • 75% of respondents use the stairs instead of the elevator (which is a great way to sneak in some physical activity at work, too!).
  • 96% of respondents practice energy conservation at home.
  • 72% of respondents practice energy conservation at work.

I’m excited to keep tracking our progress as we work towards improving our energy conservation through increased awareness and action. The money saved from all of Northern Health’s energy conservation efforts can be moved from heating facilities to healing patients!

How do you conserve energy in your home or workplace?

 

Les Sluggett

About Les Sluggett

Les Sluggett is Northern Health’s energy manager, which sees him supporting facility managers in Northern Health to explore and understand energy conservation through technologies and programs. His efforts help facilities personnel to be more energy efficient so that patients are comfortable in a reliable and safe environment. In his spare time, Les attends his local YMCA or heads outdoors skiing in the winter and canoeing & travelling in the summer. At home as at work, Les tries to reduce waste and be more energy efficient.

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Tips for private water systems

If you’re not on a municipal water system, private water sampling is important in ensuring your drinking water is safe to drink. Unfortunately, not all homeowners are aware that this is an important step in maintaining a safe private drinking water system. Please enjoy this short video created by Northern Health’s environmental health team for some information and tips on private water sampling!

 

Daisy Tam

About Daisy Tam

Daisy Tam is an Environmental Health Officer for Northern Health. She also has a background in nutritional science from UBC. Migrating up from southern B.C., Daisy has found the vast north to be full of fun and new winter and summer activities to stay busy. In her spare time, Daisy enjoys playing badminton, hiking, cross-country skiing, skating, baking, and reading as weather permits.

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Ts’uhoont’l Whuzhadel – Welcome – Bienvenue

Lheidli: “where the two rivers flow together”

T’enneh: “the People”

First Nations art on building depicting a heart with the words: "The Spirit of the Heart Welcomes our Canadian Athletes".

For the first time ever, the Canada Games have an Official Host First Nation. The 2015 Canada Winter Games are taking place on the traditional territory of the Lheidli T’enneh.

It seems that Prince George is a national leader once again! For the first time ever, the First Nation on whose territory the Canada Winter Games are being held has been invited to co-host the Games and has participated fully as a true partner and Host First Nation. The flag of the Lheidli T’enneh people flies proudly alongside all of the flags that celebrate the 2015 Canada Winter Games in Prince George; equally represented.

However, this partnership is more than just the symbolism of flags. The 2015 Canada Winter Games organizers have been immersed in the practical and nitty-gritty details of pulling off a successful winter games event – such as making sure speedskaters had the right safety bumpers and that partners like Northern Health could help ensure top-notch medical response and first aid readiness. Yet at the same time, they also worked hard in this new arena of building a meaningful relationship with the keepers of the traditional territory. In finding the proper and respectful ways to work together with a local First Nation, the 2015 Canada Winter Games Committee has made sure the first ever Host First Nation experience in Prince George has set the bar for all others to follow!

The Dakelh (Carrier) people have lived upon this land for untold centuries and were frequently hosts to gatherings. Thus, hosting an event at the place “where the two rivers flow together” is not a new experience for the local First Nation! Traditional protocols observe and respect the roles of both host and visitor. While these protocols have governed relations on the land for centuries they are still fresh and useful in the modern world. The Lheidli T’enneh have brought these ancient skills to the modern venue of the Canada Winter Games.

The story of a journey – the theme of the winter games and the heart of the opening ceremonies – also honoured the lives and history of the people of Lheidli T’enneh for their tens of centuries of living on this land. The contributions of Dakelh people are seen throughout these games. The work of Dakelh artists are evident everywhere, from the broad sweep of the shapes and colours in the official 2015 Canada Winter Games banners lining the streets to the fine details of the medals and from the wraps surrounding the pillars at the Civic Plaza to the shop windows of downtown businesses. This generous sharing of Carrier culture marked and deepened the experience of the Games for visitors and residents alike.

In the heart of downtown Prince George, often seen as a troublesome area in need of revitalization, the Lheidli T’enneh pavilion has anchored an ongoing warm winter welcome offered by Prince George and the Host First Nation. Sharing food, music and culture is the life blood here in the pavilion. The sound of drums and the performances by talented musicians and singers surrounded by food and history and culture resonates and draws in visitors. So much so that if you want to be in the audience for the 9:30 performance, I was told by a laughing greeter, “you had better be in a seat by 8:30.”

In every case where the Lheidli T’enneh have walked in the Games, the power and significance of the Games has been magnified. The opening ceremonies spoke to all who call this fair land home. The story of the river and the people was laid down, followed by the railroad and highway. The athletes walked these pathways as they entered, and by walking the symbolic land, the stage was set for the ceremonies. All nations were represented in the opening ceremonies but the centre-piecing of the Lheidli T’enneh opened the eyes of viewers to the depth and richness of Dakelh culture. The overall impression – that Prince George has got talent – was obvious. From Tristan Ghostkeeper’s athletic artistry to the little ones who sang and bounced for joy in their performances, to the pride of Chief Frederick, the message was clear: you don’t need to spend a ton of money on big name acts to move people to tears of pride. You just need to look at those amongst whom you live and see the gifts in the place that we call home.

The Games celebrate winter – one of the two seasons in northern B.C. (winter and not winter!) – in a profound way: by bringing young athletes to a national stage where they can ply their sport on snow or ice. In this shared space – a place where all eyes focus on youth and their future – we have found a way to be together honourably, Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal, as hosts to the Games.

Theresa Healy

About Theresa Healy

Theresa is the regional manager for healthy community development with Northern Health’s population health team and is passionate about the capacity of individuals, families and communities across northern B.C. to be partners in health and wellness. As part of her own health and wellness plan, she has taken up running and, more recently, weight lifting. She is also a “new-bee” bee-keeper and a devoted new grandmother. Theresa is an avid historian, writer and researcher who also holds an adjunct appointment at UNBC that allows her to pursue her other passionate love - teaching.

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Spirit the Caribou: training montage

Yesterday, we introduced the newest member of the Northern Health family – Spirit! Today, you can see the rigorous training he’s gone through to prepare to bring health messaging to northern B.C.’s youth:

Mike Erickson

About Mike Erickson

Mike Erickson is the Project Assistant in Health Promotions. He started at Northern Health in October of 2013. Mike grew up in the Lower Mainland and has called Prince George home since 2007, when he moved here to pursue a career in radio. In his spare time, Mike enjoys spending time with friends and family, watching sports, reading, and ice fishing. His favourite thing about the north is the slower pace of life and the fact that he no longer has to worry about traffic every morning.

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Introducing Spirit, the Northern Health mascot!

Northern Health CEO Cathy Ulrich  is pictured with Spirit.

Northern Health CEO Cathy Ulrich meets Spirit for the first time.

There’s a new face of healthy living in northern B.C. He eats a lot of fruits and vegetables, gets plenty of physical activity outdoors, and has some pretty solid gear to protect his head and prevent injuries! Spirit, a caribou designed by 13-year-old Prince George resident Isabel Stratton, is Northern Health’s new mascot and will be promoting healthy living across the province!

Proudly sponsored by the Spirit of the North Healthcare Foundation, Spirit has arrived just in time for the 2015 Canada Winter Games. At his stops throughout the region, Spirit will be encouraging children to develop healthy habits, like living an active lifestyle, eating healthy foods, wearing protective equipment, and more. Getting children excited about their health is key to building a healthier north!

Spirit will be travelling across northern B.C. to take part in community events and to engage the youngest members of our communities on healthy living issues. Spirit will make health more fun and accessible to a young audience, leading to healthy habits for life!

In case you were wondering where Spirit came from, as Isabel tells the story, he has had quite the journey to a healthy life himself!

Isabel's original concept art for Spirit.

Isabel’s original concept art for Spirit.

“When Spirit was young, he was adventurous and loved to explore. Throughout the years, he became big and strong. One day, when Spirit was out discovering the world, he got a really bad cold and had to go visit the doctor. The doctor said that even though it was a minor cold, it is important to be healthy so that Spirit can prevent other diseases. To help prevent other sicknesses, he learned that it is important to wash his hands and get lots of exercise.

Spirit the caribou lives all around northern B.C. It’s important for him to stay healthy so he and his family can stay strong. Spirit really enjoys exercising, eating well, and making the right choices for himself and his body.”

We can’t wait for you to meet Spirit at a healthy event near you!

 

Mike Erickson

About Mike Erickson

Mike Erickson is the Project Assistant in Health Promotions. He started at Northern Health in October of 2013. Mike grew up in the Lower Mainland and has called Prince George home since 2007, when he moved here to pursue a career in radio. In his spare time, Mike enjoys spending time with friends and family, watching sports, reading, and ice fishing. His favourite thing about the north is the slower pace of life and the fact that he no longer has to worry about traffic every morning.

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Northern balance

Young woman with two dogs in a forest

For Ashley, having access to nature just a few steps away in Prince George was crucial to finding a balance last year.

Last year was a busy time to say the least. For some reason, I thought that it would be a great idea to take a master’s program full time while working full time. I wouldn’t recommend it! That said, I know for a fact that if I lived anywhere other than northern B.C., this would have been not only difficult but totally impossible. Looking back on last year, because of the region where I lived, I actually led a seriously awesome lifestyle. One of the biggest pluses has been that when my brain was absolutely jam-packed with school lectures and work reports, I could walk to the end of my street and be in the calming stillness of nature surrounded by trees, birds, and a friendly neighbourhood moose or two.

In my six years in Prince George, I have never been as thankful to live here as I have in the past year. Getting this degree while working full time and maintaining a high level of mental wellness would not have been possible anywhere else. Some of the biggest factors that have made this possible for me include affordability, my minimal commute, and instant access to nature.

Two moose in a yard.

Occasionally, the chance to observe a moose or two would provide a well-needed study break for Ashley.

In the Lower Mainland or southern parts of B.C., there would be no way I could afford to pay for school without loans and with my full-time school and work schedule, it would be impossible to get from A to B on time. On top of this, I’d be crammed into a tiny apartment. The most important thing for me, however, has been the ability to get away from it all: to take my dog on daily walks in the bush and to be able to spend almost every weekend at a cabin, on a hiking trail, or on a ski slope or trail because it is all so close.

One thing I have learned in class is that your body takes an average of 14 minutes to adjust its frequency to its surroundings and that nature has a low, calming frequency. When pulling out my hair about research papers, exams, and statistics, the ability to calm my body’s frequency and clear my head with 14 minutes in nature has been a total lifesaver. When my “southern” friends ignorantly scoff at where I live, I simply ask them how renting, long commutes, and being broke while being trapped in the rat race is going for them. Then I tell them that I’m going to have a beer on my back deck, watch the moose in my backyard, and read a book in awesome tranquility.

Ashley Ellerbeck

About Ashley Ellerbeck

Ashley has been a recruiter for Northern Health since 2011 and absolutely loves her job and living in northern B.C. Ashley was born and raised in Salmon Arm and then obtained her undergraduate degree at Thompson Rivers University in Kamloops before completing her master's degree at UNBC. When not travelling across Canada recruiting health care professionals, Ashley enjoys being outside, yoga, cooking, real estate, her amazing friends, and travelling the globe.

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Make health fun in 2015

Two skiers on a chairlift on a ski hill.

Getting outside and trying new activities are two ways that Mandy plans to make health fun in 2015. How will you make health fun?

As 2014 comes to an end, many of us already have New Year’s resolutions dancing through our heads, wondering what commitments we will make to improve our health for 2015.

It seems as though exercising more, saving money, losing weight and quitting smoking are what most people hope to achieve for the upcoming year. The problem with resolutions is that 60% of adults make these promises each year but, of those, only about 40% will be successful. I admit that I have been guilty of this in the past: my commitment to run a half-marathon is going on six years and I don’t think this will be the year, either. So this year, I am taking a new approach: I am going to commit to having some fun in 2015!

Not “whoop it up and book a trip to Vegas” fun, but thinking of ways to improve my health with a focus on enjoyment at the same time. I am going to commit to:

  • Trying activities that are new to me. Zumba? Cross-country skiing? Geocaching? Yoga? Maybe I’ll find something I like and stick with it – and I have a better chance of accomplishing this if I bring a buddy with me!
  • Healthy meal planning. In the hustle and bustle of life, I often find it a struggle to make nutritious and delicious choices for my family at mealtimes and it’s not fun to be scrambling at the last minute. For 2015, I will focus more on meal preparation. I plan to enlist the help of my friends for new recipe ideas and my kids to help out in the kitchen. Maybe I will fit in a few potlucks and dinners with friends, too!
  • Getting outside more often. I really enjoy the outdoors and the fresh air and dose of vitamin D come as added bonuses. We have amazing natural environments in northern B.C. and four wonderful seasons. I will enjoy these with more snowshoeing, exploring new trails, playing soccer with my kids, bike riding, and going wherever my feet can take me! By committing to this at least a few times a week, I will also get in my recommended 150 minutes of exercise per week!

How will you make health fun in 2015?

Mandy Levesque

About Mandy Levesque

Mandy Levesque is Northern Health’s Team Lead for Population Health. Born and raised in northern Manitoba, Mandy and her family moved to Prince George in 2013. Mandy has a background in public health and health promotion and is a graduate of the University of Saskatchewan. She is passionate about innovation and quality, empowering northern populations, and promoting health and wellness across communities. In her spare time, Mandy enjoys spending time with her family and stays active by taking in the exciting activities, trails, and events northern B.C. has to offer.

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Health: There’s an app for that

Nurse in a hallway holding a tablet computer.

Mobile health is creating many opportunities to use smart phones and online tools for health and wellness. With the increasing ease of sharing information, individuals need to exercise caution.

As I finish waiting in line to buy tickets for the show, I have already checked Rotten Tomatoes, read the synopsis, watched the trailer, and read user reviews. I’ve also updated my Facebook status and “checked in” at the movie theatre. Only two likes?! Maybe I should post a selfie? (#catchingaflick)

All of this information and interconnectivity is available to me at the touch of a button or a slide of a finger. These amazing devices make our lives easier and help us to communicate instantly with one another in ways that were not possible even 10 years ago. In my opinion, one of the most exciting prospects about all of this functionality in the palms of our hands is the advancement and increased access to health and wellness support, information, and tools.

A number of app designers have invested in mobile technology for wellness. You can get apps that track your mood, coach you in deep breathing, or can track your immunizations. Separately, YouTube and other social media channels are used by scholarly institutions, health authorities, and health professionals as a way of sharing wellness information that can be accessed in the privacy of your own home, from the bus, or wherever you have the desire (and the data plan) to access it.

Research is demonstrating some of the benefits of the emerging field of “mobile health.” For example, research is following individuals who are quitting smoking and receiving text message encouragements (visit quitnow.ca for details), or setting people with specific medical conditions up with education and reminders through their mobile device.

In the north, where winter roads and lengthy distances can make travel difficult, technology is emerging with some exciting options for people to promote wellness and ownership of their health. Informally, communities of like-minded individuals are gathering on sites like Reddit and Pinterest to share wellness tips and information, as well as links to pertinent research or videos. However, users need to take caution.

Not all health information, sites, or sources are created equally. With the increasing ease of information sharing, it’s important for individuals to exercise caution until an app or information found on the Internet can be verified. For information to be trusted, it should come from a credible source, like a health authority. Check with your family doctor if you are unsure.

The future is bright with touch screens and I’m optimistic we’ll continue to see the benefits and development of this area of health services in the years to come.

This article was first published in A Healthier You, a joint publication of Northern Health and the Prince George Citizen.

Nick Rempel

About Nick Rempel

Nick Rempel is the clinical educator for Mental Health and Addictions, northwest B.C. He posts a monthly blog, "The Grizzly Truth," which aims to shed light on men's mental wellness. Nick has lived in northern B.C. his entire life and received his education from the University of Northern BC with a degree in nursing. He enjoys playing music, going to the gym, and watching movies in his spare time.

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I Boost Immunity Update

A group of nine nurses wear  I Boost Immunity t-shirts.

Nurses in Fort St. John “spread the good stuff!”

Three weeks ago, Northern Health participated in the launch of Immunize BC’s I Boost Immunity (IBI) campaign. As part of the campaign, nurses and support staff were equipped with IBI magnets and enthusiastically sported their IBI T-shirts in hopes of prompting conversation with clients and community members about this new web platform and its initiatives.

For those of you who haven’t heard about the campaign, it’s an innovative way for British Columbians who support vaccination to share evidence-based information through popular social media outlets like Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and the IBI web page. The more articles and stories you share, the more points you earn, which can be traded in for cool IBI swag. The ultimate goal of this campaign is to give a voice to the silent majority of those who support immunizations with the hopes of increasing vaccine rates in the province.

Two nurses wearing I Boost Immunity t-shirts pose with biceps flexed.

Boosters in Smithers flex their immune muscles!

Many Northern Health staff members can still be seen wearing their IBI t-shirts at flu clinics today! To find your local flu clinic, visit Immunize BC. Stop by to get your flu shot, learn more about the campaign, and become a booster today to “start spreading the good stuff!”

Kyrsten Thomson

About Kyrsten Thomson

Based in Terrace, Kyrsten is a public health communications liaison nurse. Her role focuses on promoting immunization awareness and supporting internal and external communications. Kyrsten moved to Terrace seven years ago after graduating with a nursing degree in Ontario. As a student, she knew public health was her passion, especially work in health promotion and community development. She fell in love with the north and all the fantastic outdoor activities right at her fingertips. Since moving to the north, Kyrsten has started a family, taken up hiking, running, and enjoys spending summer days at the cabin.

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