Healthy Living in the North

Nutrition Month: What are the ingredients for trustworthy nutrition facts?

apple, orange, lime, red pepper

Is the nutrition information you read online trustworthy?

Did you know that at least half of Canadians get their nutrition information from sources on the internet? Whether you are looking for information on picky eating, digestive issues, or managing a chronic condition like diabetes, it’s important to know that the information you are getting is credible and evidenced-based.

There’s a lot of nutrition information available out there, but let’s face it – not everything we read online is true. So how can we find nutrition information we can trust?

March is Nutrition Month, and registered dietitians from Northern Health (and across the country!) are ready to share their tips for healthy eating – and to help Northerners separate nutrition fact from fiction.

Here are 5 questions you can ask to help determine if the nutrition information you are reading online is trustworthy:

  • Is the website promoting a quick fix or a miracle cure?
  • Is the website trying to sell me something instead of providing education?
  • Are the website authors qualified to give nutrition information? (Tip – registered dietitians are the only regulated nutrition professionals in BC)
  • Is the information derived from personal opinion rather than scientific evidence?
  • Do the facts on the website sound too good to be true?

If you answer “yes” to most of these questions, that information might not be reliable. Which means it would be best to take a pass!

Fortunately in B.C., everyone can access credible nutrition information from registered dietitians at HealthLinkBC. You can speak directly to a dietitian Monday to Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. by calling 8-1-1, or you can email a dietitian any time of day by visiting healthlinkbc.ca/healthy-eating.

You can also get nutrition tips and delicious healthy recipes from local dietitians on the Northern Health blog (blog.northernhealth.ca) every #FoodieFriday, during Nutrition Month, and all year long!

This article was adapted from materials found on the Dietitians of Canada Nutrition Month website: nutritionmonth2017.ca.

Marianne Bloudoff

About Marianne Bloudoff

Born and raised in BC, Marianne moved from Vancouver to Prince George in January 2014. She is a Registered Dietitian with Northern Health's population health team. Her passion for food and nutrition lured her away from her previous career in Fisheries Management. Now, instead of counting fish, she finds herself educating people on their health benefits. In her spare time, Marianne can be found experimenting in the kitchen and writing about it on her food blog, as well as exploring everything northern B.C. has to offer.

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