Healthy Living in the North

Writing a grant application – anyone can do it!

Group of young people with archery equipment

The Eagle Eye Archers in Prince Rupert are one group that benefited from an IMAGINE grant. Take steps to make sure that your grant application hits the mark!

For many people, even the thought of writing a grant proposal or application is intimidating. Rest assured that by keeping a few key tips in mind, anyone can do it!

Most grant programs get more applications than there are funds available. Whether you are applying for one of Northern Health’s grants (IMAGINE Community Grant applications are now open!) or are looking into a different grant program, follow these tips to ensure that your application stands out above the rest!

1. Know your project plan

  • Read the application beforehand and ensure that you are able to answer all questions and sections fully. Your enthusiasm for your project should come through.

2. Know your audience

  • Who will be able to participate in this project and the activities? Northern Health grants are keen to support projects that reduce health inequities and help those who are disadvantaged or vulnerable to improve their access to supports and resources for better health.

3. Confirm your timelines

  • Many grant programs have multiple cycles per year as well as deadlines for project completion and evaluation. Does your project start date fit within this timeline or should you wait for a future cycle?

4. List key project partners

  • Strong partnerships = strong projects! Working with other groups builds capacity and can be a great opportunity to learn from one another. Partnerships also help to ensure sustainability. Having more people involved can help to grow the project and increases its chance of lasting.
  • When listing partners, you should be able to explain their roles and responsibilities in the project.

5. Describe and connect project goals and activities

  • Be very specific about what you want to achieve in your community through your project. What is the ultimate goal(s)? What will success look like?
  • You should be able to directly connect your planned activities to these goals.

6. Explain the benefit to community

  • Applications should describe why a project is needed in your community. What sets your project apart from others in the community?

7. Have a clear budget

  • Remember to include all of the costs that will be associated with your project activities. Ensure that the total cost of the project is explained, specify the amount being requested from the grant, and identify where any other sources of funding will be coming from.
  • Confirming fundraising efforts or that other sources of funding have been explored shows community engagement and motivation for the project to succeed. Don’t forget to identify in-kind or free supports.
  • Ensure that the funding you are requesting fits the grant criteria. For example, if wages aren’t eligible for coverage under the grant criteria, don’t request them in your application.

8. Describe the future plans to keep the project going

  • We want to support projects that are thinking about sustainability from the beginning and we are less likely to support a one-time event or activity. Provide details on how the project will continue to grow in your community. Use a grant like our IMAGINE grant as the seed to get you started!

9. Get letters of support from partners and community members

  • Letters of support from project partners, additional funders, or people who will benefit from the project in the community are a great help! They show engagement and investment.
  • One or two letters are enough, but they should be specific to the project.

10. Choose an exciting project name

  • Choose a name for your project that will grab people’s attention – whether that’s the person reading the application or someone who wants to learn more about your project in the community. Be unique but keep it simple!

11. Learn from others


A version of this article first appeared in the winter 2016 issue of Healthier You magazine.

Mandy Levesque

About Mandy Levesque

Mandy Levesque is Northern Health’s Lead, Healthy Community Development, Integrated Community Granting. Born and raised in northern Manitoba, Mandy and her family moved to Prince George in 2013. Mandy has a background in public health and health promotion and is a graduate of the University of Saskatchewan. She is passionate about innovation and quality, empowering northern populations, and promoting health and wellness across communities. In her spare time, Mandy enjoys spending time with her family and stays active by taking in the exciting activities, trails, and events northern B.C. has to offer.

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Imagining accessible recreation in Chetwynd

Northern Health’s IMAGINE Community Grants provide funding to a variety of groups with projects that make northern communities healthier. Our hope is that these innovative projects inspire healthy community actions where you live! Check out the story below and read more IMAGINE Community Grant stories.


Recreational equipment

With the purchase of bikes, helmets, sporting equipment, bear bells, hiking poles, fishing rods, and life jackets the Imagine Chetwynd project provided access to recreational opportunities that may not have been available to people otherwise.

Last spring, the Chetwynd Visitor Centre set a goal to create more opportunities for people to experience fun activities in their area, with a focus on improving the health and wellness of residents and visitors. From this goal – and some seed funding support from IMAGINE Community Grants – Imagine Chetwynd was born!

Through the purchase of bikes, helmets, sporting equipment, bear bells, hiking poles, fishing rods, and life jackets – as well as strong partnerships developed with the Chetwynd Public Library and the Tansi Friendship Centre – the project provided access to recreational opportunities that may not be available to people otherwise. The library helped promote the project and ran a Facebook Page where people could share stories and photos after using the equipment. The friendship centre supported the distribution and storage of some of the equipment, which improved access for youth, seniors, and families.

The positive outcomes as a result of the project were the community partnerships. The combined effort to create or enhance activities within the community was a positive experience. Partnering with groups who have the ability and skills to promote and deliver helped create success in the project. Community members welcomed, and were pleased with, the opportunity for friends or out of town family members to join them in trail hikes, bike rides, and fishing lakes and local rivers in the area; the local sporting goods store owner supplied the tackle for fishing. -Tyria Plamondon, Chetwynd Visitor Centre

IMAGINE Community Grant funds supported the purchase of bikes, helmets, fishing gear, and a variety of sporting equipment to get the program started.

The Imagine Chetwynd project will continue to be a sustainable program as the equipment and supplies acquired through the IMAGINE grant funding have longevity and equipment maintenance or replacement costs have been budgeted for the future.

One of our most eye-catching investments was a vibrant, candy apple red tandem bike. This beautiful, strikingly unusual bike was an eye opener and head turner when it was out in the community. It caught the attention of young and old alike… The bike provided our community with a little treasure that sets us apart from other northern communities. -Tyria Plamondon

Two men on tandem bike.

One of Imagine Chetwynd’s most eye-catching recreational investments: a bright red tandem bicycle!

It has to be mentioned that the project is not just a summer project. Included in the purchase of sporting and recreational equipment (rackets, balls, horseshoes, etc.), funds received also supported the purchase of snowshoes and an ice auger for ice fishing, so residents and visitors can enjoy the outdoors all year long!

The Imagine Chetwynd project has opened opportunities for exposure to all of our parks, activities, courts, lakes, streams, and attractions through the use of free equipment and ease of access provided with the project. -Tyria Plamondon

This project is a great example of what some local initiative and thinking outside of the box can do to create fun, accessible, and health-promoting opportunities for people in the north!

For more information on the Imagine Chetwynd program and to see some cool photos of this project in action, check out the Chetwynd Visitors Centre on Facebook.


IMAGINE Community Grants provide funding to community organizations, service agencies, First Nations bands and organizations, schools, municipalities, regional districts, not-for-profits, and other partners with projects that make northern communities healthier. We are looking for applications that will support our efforts to prevent chronic disease and injury, and improve overall well-being in our communities. At the time of this story’s publication, the deadline for the next cycle of IMAGINE Community Grants is March 31, 2017.

Mandy Levesque

About Mandy Levesque

Mandy Levesque is Northern Health’s Lead, Healthy Community Development, Integrated Community Granting. Born and raised in northern Manitoba, Mandy and her family moved to Prince George in 2013. Mandy has a background in public health and health promotion and is a graduate of the University of Saskatchewan. She is passionate about innovation and quality, empowering northern populations, and promoting health and wellness across communities. In her spare time, Mandy enjoys spending time with her family and stays active by taking in the exciting activities, trails, and events northern B.C. has to offer.

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What are your ideas?

Room full of people

If you have ideas to help people get healthier, start sharing them! In Prince George, PechaKucha provided one way to share ideas. How does your community share ideas?

Are you happy and healthy? Do you belong to any groups in your community, go to school, or work in a place where you want to see people become healthier? Do you have family and friends who care about you and you care about them? Do you eat healthy foods, get some exercise, stay away from tobacco, and wear safety gear?

As more people in the north become healthier, we all win. What do we win, you might ask? We all win safe and healthy communities filled with healthy families and people of all ages!

How can you build a healthier community?

This is why Northern Health wants to listen to the ideas you and your community have to become healthier. This is why we fund community-based health promotion projects to make you and all of the people you see around you where you live, work, learn and play become safer, healthier and happier.

The health promotion projects that northern schools, groups and communities are doing together are amazing. Project ideas are sometimes very simple and sometimes they can be very complicated, but they all have one thing in common:

Someone had an idea to help the people around them become healthier.

We all have ideas about how things could be better, but we don’t always share them. Sharing your idea can be such a great idea!

There is a very interesting way that people of all ages from around the world are telling stories and sharing their ideas. It’s called PechaKucha and it isn’t as hard to pronounce as it looks, but you may want to jot it down because it might be a new idea to you.

Stories are a powerful way to share ideas and also learn from others ideas. People of all ages are using PechaKucha to share their ideas and stories in short, simple ways. The idea is that you tell a story by showing 20 images for 20 seconds each. Any community or group can do PechaKucha; all you need is an idea or story to share.

In Prince George, Northern Health helped fund a local group of northern storytellers to get started. You can explore their stories and lots of others at the PechaKucha site.

Here is the question again: Do you have ideas to help people become healthier?

The next question is: Do you share them? If you have ideas to help people get healthier, start sharing them! Your idea might one day help your community become safer, happier and healthier.

Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it’s the only thing that ever has.

-Margaret Mead

Room full of people


About the IMAGINE Grants

Northern Health’s IMAGINE Grants fund health promotion projects by community partners, including northern groups/organizations and schools or districts, to support the health and wellness of northerners where they live, work, learn, and play. Ideas for projects are inspired and guided by Northern Health’s Position Statements. We’re happy to have an ongoing series of blog posts that will highlight past recipients of IMAGINE Grants and share their great work with you!

 

Christine Glennie-Visser

About Christine Glennie-Visser

Christine is the regional coordinator for the HEAL (Healthy Eating, Active Living) Network in northern B.C. Christine loves to share good healthy local food with family, friends and co-workers and is passionate about making the healthy choice the easier choice for everyone. Although she is currently limited in her physical activity choices for medical reasons, she has become creative at fitting in activity and spends many happy hours deep water running and using gentle resistance training and stretching to maintain muscle strength. Christine can often be found in her kitchen, developing or testing recipes, and conspiring with her six grandchildren to encourage their parents to eat more fruits and vegetables!

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