Healthy Living in the North

What’s the real story on influenza (flu)?

Spirit caribou mascot getting flu shot.

Protect yourself and your loved ones – get your flu shot! Flu shots are available at any community pharmacy and may be available from your family physician or nurse practitioner.

A version of this article was first published in the Winter 2015 issue of Healthier You magazine.


In my experience as a nurse, I have heard many questions about the flu and the flu vaccine. With flu season upon us, I wanted to look at some of the common myths I hear every year about influenza (“the flu”) and the vaccine in hopes to provide some accurate information for you to learn and share this season!

There is often a misunderstanding about the flu, with many believing that influenza is the stomach flu or the common cold. In fact, the flu is generally much worse than the common cold. Symptoms such as fever, headache, aches and pains, extreme fatigue, and cough are more common and more intense with the flu than they are with the common cold.

The common cold also generally does not result in serious health problems. Influenza, on the other hand, can lead to bacterial infections such as ear infection, a sinus infection, bronchitis, or pneumonia. Certain groups of people – such as seniors 65 and older, very young children, and people who have lung or heart disease, certain chronic health conditions, or weakened immune systems – are at high risk for serious flu complications.

Influenza is highly contagious and infects millions of Canadians every year. While most recover in about a week, thousands of Canadians, most of them young children and seniors, will die due to flu-related complications like pneumonia each year.

“I got the flu from my flu shot” is probably the most common myth I hear. In fact, the flu shot cannot give you influenza because the vaccine contains killed viruses that cannot cause infection. The vaccine that is given as a nasal spray does contain live virus but these viruses are attenuated (weakened) and cannot cause flu illness.

Another common question is why we need to get the flu vaccine every year. Because the flu virus is constantly changing, the flu vaccine is reviewed and updated each year to protect you.

How can I prevent influenza?

  • Wash your hands regularly
  • Promptly dispose of used tissues in the waste basket or garbage
  • Cough and sneeze into your shirt sleeve rather than your hands
  • Stay home when you are ill
  • Get an influenza vaccine (are you eligible for a free vaccine?). Vaccines are available at any community pharmacy and may be available from your family physician or nurse practitioner.

Benefits of the flu vaccine

  • Prevents you from getting sick with the flu.
  • Helps protect people around you who are more vulnerable to a serious flu illness.
  • Helps to make your illness milder if you do get sick.

More information

Kathryn Germuth

About Kathryn Germuth

From northern B.C., Kathryn worked as a public health nurse in the communities of Terrace and Kitimat before filling in as the Public Health Communications Liaison Nurse. Kathryn has a passion for healthy community work and health promotion. She loves living in the north and experiencing all it has to offer including going for a jog amongst our beautiful scenery. This Christmas, she is expecting a new addition to her family and excited for all the new experiences and joy that will bring.

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10 tips for a happy and healthy first five years

How can we ensure that our children, families, and communities are as healthy as possible? I had the chance to ask some Northern Health experts for their thoughts and here are ten tips (in no particular order!) that they shared.

Do you have ideas on growing up healthy in northern B.C.? We want to hear from you! Look for a free community meeting in your community or join the conversation online via Thoughtexchange!

10 tips for a happy and healthy first five years!

Child outside with sun glasses

Get outside and play, follow the routine immunization schedule, and model healthy eating are three of our 10 tips for a happy and healthy first five years! What can you do to ensure that our children grow up healthy in northern B.C.?

#1: Get outside and play

Children who play outside tend to have better health, spend more time playing, have better social interactions, are more creative, and have greater resiliency. Studies show that children who explore and take risks in supportive environments have the chance to figure out their own limits and do not see an increase in injuries.

#2: Wear the gear

Teach your child to keep their head safe. Put a fitted helmet on every time they tricycle, toboggan, bike, skate, or ski. Out on the water? Have your child in the right sized, fitted lifejacket for all water activities. Model safe behaviour yourself!

#3: Follow the routine immunization schedule

Immunization is one of the best ways to ensure your children stay healthy and are protected from certain vaccine preventable diseases. The routine immunization schedule ensures your child is protected as soon as they can be and is based on the best science of today. Learn more.

#4: Be aware of hazards

Scrapes and bruises won’t slow a child down for long, but serious injury can change their life forever. Identify and move anything that could burn, choke or poison your child. Move furniture away from windows. Lock up poisonous items like medicines, vitamins, alcohol, tobacco, and cleaning supplies. Keep hot liquids out of reach. Lower your tap water temperature to prevent scalds.

#5: Take time to give love, hugs, smiles and lots of reassurance

Emotional attachment is one of the keys to raising a happy, confident child. Ensure a close connection by spending time face-to-face with your baby each day, observing your baby, and getting down on the floor with your baby. Check out Vanessa’s article in Healthier You magazine for more tips.

#6: Raise children in tobacco-free families

Children who are exposed to second-hand smoke have increased health risks including respiratory problems and sudden infant death syndrome. They are also more likely to become smokers themselves. Reduce these risks in your family! Visit QuitNow.ca for resources to help you quit and access free nicotine replacement therapy products or medications through the BC Smoking Cessation Program.

#7: Find quality care

Looking for child care? Look for licensed child care providers who are warm, caring, respectful, and attentive to children’s individual needs. Daycare activities should recognize the value of play and happen in safe, well-planned environments that invite children to learn and grow. Learn more about licensing in the summer issue of Healthier You.

#8: Stop cavities and smile brightly

Brush children’s teeth daily with a rice-sized amount of fluoride toothpaste. Limit drinks and food to scheduled meal and snack times and use a lidless cup to drink water for thirst. Start regular dental visits at age one or after teeth start appearing. Learn more.

#9: Crawl, dance, and play your way to 180 minutes!

According to the Canadian Physical Activity Guidelines, children aged 1-4 should accumulate at least 180 minutes of physical activity at any intensity spread throughout the day. Try various activities – crawling, walking, playing outdoors, and exploring – that develop movement skills in different environments. As children age, play can get more energetic – progress toward at least 60 minutes of energetic play per day by age 5.

#10: Model healthy eating

Eat with your child whenever possible, as this helps them learn from you. Provide regular meals and snacks. Offer a variety of nutritious foods from all four food groups. Allow your child to decide if and how much they want to eat.

Learn more from trusted resources:

This article was originally published in Healthier You magazine. Check out the Summer 2016 issue below!

Vince Terstappen

About Vince Terstappen

Vince Terstappen is a Project Assistant with the health promotions team at Northern Health. He has an undergraduate and graduate degree in the area of community health and is passionate about upstream population health issues. Born and raised in Calgary, Vince lived, studied, and worked in Saskatoon, Victoria, and Vancouver before moving to Vanderhoof in 2012. When not cooking or baking, he enjoys speedskating, gardening, playing soccer, attending local community events, and Skyping with his old community health classmates who are scattered across the world. Vince works with Northern Health program areas to share healthy living stories and tips through the blog and moderates all comments for the Northern Health Matters blog.

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Keeping children safe and healthy with routine immunizations

I’m drawn to the topic of immunization for National Immunization Awareness Week, which this year is April 23-30. It’s a chance to highlight the importance of routine immunizations and focus on accurate and up-to-date information and resources. It’s also a good time to reflect on the fact that in the last 50 years, immunization has saved more lives than any other intervention.

Immunization is one of the best ways parents can ensure their children stay healthy and protected from certain vaccine-preventable diseases!

During the first two years of a child’s life, they are very vulnerable and can be susceptible to many vaccine-preventable diseases. These diseases can have serious health consequences for many infants and young children. In some cases, they can be deadly.

National Immunization Awareness Week poster

“For the best protection, it’s recommended that parents follow the routine schedule and ensure all shots are given on time.”

In B.C., infants and young children aged 0-5 are given free vaccines that provide protection from the following diseases:

  • Tetanus
  • Diphtheria
  • Pertussis (whooping cough)
  • Hepatitis B
  • Polio
  • Haemophilus Influenza type B (Hib)
  • Meningococcal
  • Pneumococcal
  • Varicella
  • Measles
  • Mumps
  • Rubella (German Measles)
  • Rotavirus
  • Influenza
  • Hepatitis A (vaccine provided to Aboriginal children only)

The current immunization schedule for infants and children in B.C. has infants starting with their first set of immunizations at two months of age followed by immunizations at four months, six months, 12 months, 18 months, and kindergarten entry.

For the best protection, it’s recommended that parents follow the routine schedule and ensure all shots are given on time.

Here are six reasons from ImmunizeBC.ca why it’s best to follow the routine schedule:

  1. The routine schedule is based on the best science of today.
  2. The routine schedule is safe and works very well.
  3. You will ensure your child is protected as soon as they can be.
  4. You will reduce your child’s risk of anxiety and needle fear.
  5. The risk of side effects is the same whether vaccines are given together or separately.
  6. You will reduce the number of visits and time spent getting your child’s shots.

In B.C., parents can take their children to their local health unit for immunizations.

Have questions or want more information?

  • Call your local health unit and speak to a public health nurse.
  • Speak to your family doctor or primary health care provider.
  • Call HealthLinkBC (dial 8-1-1). They’re open 24 hours!
  • Visit ImmunizeBC.ca

About Patricia Strim

Photo and bio coming soon!

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National Immunization Awareness Week – 100,000 Vaccine Challenge

Nurses with I Boost Immunity t-shirts in a group photo

Northern Health nurses are boosting immunity – how will you be marking Immunization Awareness Week?

This week is National Immunization Awareness Week and it’s a great time to think about the importance of immunizations! I’m celebrating by taking the “100,000 Vaccine Challenge” with I Boost Immunity and I want to challenge you to take part, too! Together, we can help vaccinate children around the world!

Here’s how it works

I Boost Immunity encourages ordinary people like you to do a series of fun and informative online quizzes. For each right answer, one vaccine is donated to UNICEF Canada. You can also share articles and stories about the importance of vaccination through your social networks. The more you do on the site to learn and share, the more vaccines you earn in support of UNICEF Canada. It’s that simple. I’ll be taking quizzes all week and hope that you’ll join me!

The online quizzes start easy but get more challenging as you level up. You can also form teams and earn achievement badges along the way. Do practically anything on I Boost Immunity and you’ll earn vaccines!

Check out I Boost Immunity and get clicking to help us reach 100,000 vaccines by April 30th!

Carlin Miroslaw

About Carlin Miroslaw

Based in Houston, Carlin is the interim Communications Liaison Nurse for Northern Health. Her role focuses on promoting immunization awareness and supporting internal and external communications. Having lived in the North for over 30 years, Carlin has pursued her outdoor passions of hiking, swimming, canoeing, biking, skiing, and gardening.

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Feel the tingles? Could be shingles!

This month, we want to know how you are preparing for the future by investing in your health! Tell us (or show us) what you do to invest in your body, your mind, and your relationships for your chance to win great weekly prizes and a $150 grand prize! To inspire you, we’ll be featuring regular healthy aging content on the Northern Health Matters blog all month long!


Shingles rash

As we age, vaccinations remain a safe and effective way to help prevent serious illness and complications that can result from exposure to certain viruses and bacteria. One viral infection that can make an appearance as we age is shingles. (Photo from ImmunizeBC)

For many adults, staying healthy means eating a well-balanced diet, staying active and maintaining strong social connections. All of these factors are important, but one frequently overlooked aspect of our physical health is keeping up-to-date with our vaccinations.

As we age, vaccinations remain a safe and effective way to help prevent serious illness and complications that can result from exposure to certain viruses and bacteria. One viral infection that can make an appearance as we age is shingles. Here’s what you need to know to steer clear of this unpleasant experience:

What causes shingles?

Do you remember getting chickenpox as a child and suffering from an itchy rash of blisters? Well, when your rash cleared up and you started feeling well again, it was just the virus going into hibernation mode in your body. Shingles, or herpes zoster, occurs when the chickenpox virus decides to wake up from its long nap.

Who gets shingles?

Shingles can affect anyone with a history of chickenpox, but it is most common and more severe in people over 50 years of age and those individuals with immune systems that have been weakened by medication or disease. The lifetime risk of getting shingles is about 30%. In Canada, it is estimated that there are 130,000 new cases of shingles each year!

What does shingles look like?

  • A rash typically appears on one side of the face or body and may last for 2-4 weeks.
  • Before the rash appears, some people experience pain, itching or tingling of the skin.
  • Early symptoms may also include fever, headache, nausea, chills and sensitivity to light.
  • Approximately 1 in 5 people get severe, long lasting pain known as post-herpetic neuralgia.

How is shingles treated?

Your health care provider may prescribe an antiviral medication to treat shingles. It is best to start these medications as soon as possible after the rash appears. Early treatment can shorten the length of time the illness lasts and may keep the illness from getting worse. So, if you think you might have shingles, see a health care provider as soon as possible.

What do I need to know about the shingles vaccine?

  • In 2008, a shingles (zoster) vaccine was approved for use in Canada for individuals 50 years of age and older.
  • It is recommended, but not provided free, for people over 60 years of age. Only one dose is need for protection.
  • The vaccine is safe & effective, and has been shown to reduce the risk of getting shingles by 50%.
  • If you get shingles after being immunized, the vaccine can reduce the amount of pain you experience.
  • The shingles vaccine can be purchased at most travel clinics and pharmacies for about $200. Some health insurance plans may cover the cost of the vaccine.

What do I need to know about preventing shingles?

  • Shingles is not spread through sneezing, coughing or casual contact.
  • A person is not contagious before the rash appears and once the skin lesions crust over.
  • When a person with shingles infects another person with the virus, that virus will cause chickenpox, not shingles.
  • Chickenpox will only occur in people who have not had chickenpox before, nor been immunized against it.
  • People with shingles should cover their rash, avoid touching their rash, and wash their hands often.

More information

Jaime Bauman

About Jaime Bauman

Jaime graduated from the UNBC Nursing Program in 2003 and she is currently working as a team lead for Preventive Public Health Nursing in Prince George. Jaime is passionate about health promotion and working with children & families in the early years. Jaime embraces all that northern living has to offer with her husband, two daughters and their Rhodesian Ridgeback, Jake. In her spare time, Jaime enjoys a variety of outdoor activities with her family including gardening, hiking and cross-country skiing.

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Tackling a flu myth

Woman getting a flu shot.

As a healthy adult, you may not be at a high risk of a serious illness yourself, but those around you may be more vulnerable. Protect those you care about by getting your flu shot this influenza season!

As a public health nurse, I often hear people say, “I’m healthy so I don’t need to have the flu shot.” I hope to provide some information to help debunk this common misconception.

First, while you may not be at a high risk of a serious illness yourself, those around you may be more vulnerable. Even mild flu symptoms mean that you could be carrying the virus and passing it on to your family, friends, co-workers, and many others you come into contact with every day.

By getting immunized, you will develop the antibodies to break down the flu virus in your system. This lowers your risk of catching the virus, reduces the severity of symptoms, and avoids spreading the infection to those who are most vulnerable.

It’s also important to know that most healthy adults may be able to infect people before symptoms develop. This means you may be able to pass on the flu virus before you even know you are sick. Some people can also be infected with the flu and have no symptoms but still spread it to others.

Why get immunized? The flu can be serious for many groups of people including young children, older adults, and people with certain chronic health conditions. Even healthy adults can get very sick from the flu and be at risk for serious complications, hospitalization or death.

Protect those you care about by getting your flu shot this influenza season.

Did you know?

In B.C., in addition to vulnerable groups like young children and seniors, the influenza vaccine is also provided free to:

  • Household contacts of children and adults with chronic health conditions
  • Household contacts and caregivers of infants and children aged 0-59 months
  • Household contacts of pregnant women
  • Visitors to health care facilities and other patient care locations

For more information on who is eligible for free influenza vaccine, visit Northern Health’s influenza page. Anyone not eligible for a free influenza vaccine can purchase it at some pharmacies and travel clinics.

To find a flu clinic near you, visit ImmunizeBC.

Kathryn Germuth

About Kathryn Germuth

From northern B.C., Kathryn worked as a public health nurse in the communities of Terrace and Kitimat before filling in as the Public Health Communications Liaison Nurse. Kathryn has a passion for healthy community work and health promotion. She loves living in the north and experiencing all it has to offer including going for a jog amongst our beautiful scenery. This Christmas, she is expecting a new addition to her family and excited for all the new experiences and joy that will bring.

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HPV vaccine = Cancer prevention

Did you know that the human papillomavirus (HPV) is a well-established cause of cancer and is present in nearly all cervical cancers?

You may have heard a lot of buzz about the HPV vaccine, but it can be hard to get all the facts when life is busy! So here’s what you need to know!

What is HPV?

HPV is the most common sexually-transmitted infection in the world today. Approximately three out of four sexually active Canadians will have at least one HPV infection in their lifetime. You can get HPV by having sex or skin-to-skin genital contact with someone who has the virus.

What is the HPV vaccine?

There are two vaccines approved for use in Canada, Cervarix® and Gardasil®, that protect against cervical cancer, anal cancer, and various other cancers. The Gardasil® vaccine also protects against genital warts.

Who should be immunized?

Girls in Grade 6 are provided the Gardasil® vaccine for free in B.C. If you missed your HPV vaccine, or if your daughter missed it in school, you may still be eligible for free vaccine. Girls and young women born in 1994 or later who missed getting the vaccine in school can contact their health care provider to get immunized for free.

New for B.C. is that some boys and men are eligible for free vaccine, too! The HPV vaccine is provided free of charge to males aged 9-26 who are questioning their sexual orientation, have sex with men, are street involved, or are infected with HIV. For full eligibility criteria, visit the HPV page at HealthLinkBC.

The vaccine is also recommended for adult women up to 45 years old, boys and men 9-26 who do not meet the specified criteria above, and men 27 and older who have sex with men. For these three groups, HPV vaccine can be purchased at most pharmacies.

Vaccine bottle and packaging

The Gardasil(r) vaccine is one of two HPV vaccines approved for use in Canada. It protects against cervical cancer, various other cancers, and genital warts.

HPV vaccine facts:

  • Vaccination provides the best protection when given to girls aged 9-13.
  • The vaccine works best if received before a person becomes sexually active.
  • Those who are sexually active may still benefit from the vaccine.
  • The HPV vaccine is safe – over 175 million doses have been distributed worldwide.
  • You can’t get HPV from the vaccine.
  • Vaccination is up to 99 per cent effective at preventing the types of HPV that are responsible for most genital warts and HPV-related cancers.

Visit ImmunizeBC for more information about HPV.

Kathryn Germuth

About Kathryn Germuth

From northern B.C., Kathryn worked as a public health nurse in the communities of Terrace and Kitimat before filling in as the Public Health Communications Liaison Nurse. Kathryn has a passion for healthy community work and health promotion. She loves living in the north and experiencing all it has to offer including going for a jog amongst our beautiful scenery. This Christmas, she is expecting a new addition to her family and excited for all the new experiences and joy that will bring.

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Back to school – don’t forget a strong immune system for your child!

Public health nurse

As you support your kindergarten child through these first few, nervous weeks, it’s important to think of what you can do to prepare their immune system for long-lasting strength!

Has it really been two weeks already? It’s hard to believe that we’re busy getting everyone organized for back to school again! For our kindergarten kids, that means learning a new routine, organizing and preparing their lunches and ensuring they have everything they need to be successful in this new environment.

But don’t forget the one thing they need that might not be on your list – a strong immune system! As you prepare your kindergarten child for school and support them through these first few, nervous weeks, it’s important to think of what you can do to prepare their immune system for long-lasting strength!

The immunization program in B.C. recommends that children aged 4-6 receive their boosters of tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis, polio, varicella (chicken pox), measles, mumps, and rubella. For some children, it’s also recommended that they boost their protection against hepatitis A. The list of diseases we need to protect our kindergarteners against seems daunting, but don’t worry! Many of these immunizations are now made into combined formulations, which means fewer injections for your child. For most kindergarten kids, only three injections are needed to protect them against all of these diseases.

You may also be wondering what your local public health nurse is doing to prepare for the new school year. We are busy collecting demographic data from your child’s school and calling you to inform you of the various kindergarten blitzes or health fairs that are happening in your community. As a public health nurse, I take pride in ensuring that you have easy access to the clinics so that your child receives all the protection they need as they enter school this year. If you can’t make it to one of these community events, don’t worry because we are happy to see you in our regular clinics, too!

So, while you are actively preparing your kindergarten child for school and hearing their exciting tales of the first few days in class, don’t forget that your public health nurses and primary health care providers are also preparing to assist you in protecting your child against many harmful diseases that still circulate today! Let us make it easy for you to do the very best for your child, because I know that’s one less thing you have to worry about – especially when you might just want to focus on the excitement of your child entering kindergarten this year!

Contact your local health unit or usual primary health care provider to find out if your child’s immunizations are up-to-date. You can also visit Northern Health or ImmunizeBC for more information on vaccine-preventable illnesses and immunizations.

Lara Frederick

About Lara Frederick

Lara is a public health nurse currently working in Dawson Creek. She is currently completing her master's of nursing and enjoys volunteering for the Canadian Cancer Society and her workplace wellness committee. Lara loves to travel and one of her favorite places has been Turkey. She loves to go snowshoeing and cross-country skiing and also loves walking around exploring the outdoors with her two dogs.

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Is your daughter in Grade 6 this year? Do you have questions about the HPV vaccine?

Dog with a sign that says "back to school".

It’s back-to-school season across the province! With all of the papers your kids are bringing home, Kathryn urges you to keep your eyes open for the Immunization Consent Form and answers your questions about the HPV vaccine and how it can protect your kids from cancer.

As we settle back into school routines and the leaves slowly start to yellow and fall, you may feel overwhelmed with the handfuls of papers that your child is bringing back from school. One paper that I hope you watch out for is the Grade 6 Immunization Consent Form.

You may have heard a lot about one of the vaccines offered to female students in Grade 6: the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine. As a public health nurse, I have had many conversations with parents and girls about the HPV vaccine. I am frequently impressed with the amount of reading and research that parents do on their own to make the best choices for their children. Often, our main resource for information is social media like Facebook where it can be a challenge to find information that is evidence-based and reliable.

My goal in writing this blog is to provide you with some helpful information on the HPV vaccine and some of the valuable sites for more information that are at your fingertips! I thought about some of the most frequently asked questions that I get from parents and young women about the HPV vaccine and thought that some of these may be on your mind, too, as you consider the HPV vaccine for yourself or your child.

What is the HPV vaccine anyways?

Gardasil® (HPV4) is the HPV vaccine given to Grade 6 girls in B.C. It protects against 4 different types of HPV infection.

It provides protection against two types of HPV that cause about 70% of cervical cancers, 80% of anal cancers, and various other cancers such as cancers of the mouth & throat, penis, vagina, and vulva. It also protects against infection from two more types of HPV that cause about 90% of genital warts cases.

What is HPV?

HPV is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the world today. Approximately 75% of sexually active Canadians will have at least one HPV infection in their lifetime. HPV is spread through skin-to-skin contact. Any kind of sexual activity involving oral or genital contact can spread HPV. Sexual intercourse is not necessary to get infected.

Why should I vaccinate my Grade 6 daughter?

Many parents have asked me why their child should have the vaccine if their daughters are not currently sexually active. Research has shown that vaccination provides the best levels of protection in girls aged 9 to 13. In fact, preteens have a better immune response to the vaccine. The vaccine works best when it is given before sexual activity begins, because the HPV vaccines were developed to prevent HPV, not to treat it.

Is the vaccine safe?

I often receive questions about the HPV vaccine and its safety. Studies show that the HPV vaccine is safe and effective. Since the HPV vaccine was approved, 175 million doses have been distributed worldwide. Vaccines in Canada are only licenced for use if they meet strict standards for safety and effectiveness.

The most common side effects from the vaccine include redness, swelling, and soreness in the arm where the vaccine was given as well as headache and fever. You cannot become infected with HPV from the vaccine and the vaccines do not contain any antibiotics or preservatives, such as mercury or thimerosal.

What if my daughter missed her Grade 6 vaccine?

Worried your daughter missed her Grade 6 HPV vaccine? Girls born in 1994 or later who missed getting the HPV4 vaccine can contact their health care provider to get immunized at no cost.

What else do I need to know about HPV and cervical cancer?

  • Three out of four sexually active women will get HPV at some point in their lives.
  • Most don’t show any signs or symptoms and can pass the virus onto others without even knowing it.
  • Every year in B.C., 175 women will get cervical cancer.

What about my son and other boys and men?

You may have heard of new eligibility for HPV vaccine for boys and men aged 9-26 in B.C. While there is new eligibility for free vaccine for certain boys and men, there will be no changes to the school vaccine programs. If you’d like more information about new eligibility criteria and accessing the free vaccine for boys and men, visit HealthLinkBC.

Can you suggest any other helpful resources about HPV?

  • For more information on the HPV vaccine, visit HPV Info or ImmunizeBC.
  • Check out some informative videos about the HPV vaccine at ImmunizeBC. I like the Dr. Mike Evans videos and find the personal stories of experiences with cervical cancer very powerful to watch.
  • If you have more questions or would like more information about the HPV vaccine, speak to your doctor or contact your primary care provider.
Kathryn Germuth

About Kathryn Germuth

From northern B.C., Kathryn worked as a public health nurse in the communities of Terrace and Kitimat before filling in as the Public Health Communications Liaison Nurse. Kathryn has a passion for healthy community work and health promotion. She loves living in the north and experiencing all it has to offer including going for a jog amongst our beautiful scenery. This Christmas, she is expecting a new addition to her family and excited for all the new experiences and joy that will bring.

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Protect yourself against tetanus this spring!

Couple hiking in forest.

Planning on heading outdoors this season? Make sure that your tetanus immunizations are up-to-date!

The temperature outside is finally above zero, which has provided me with a burst of spring energy! Most of us have long awaited the first signs of spring and are now ready to enjoy the temperate outdoors. Hiking is one of my favourite outdoor activities to do once the snow has melted so I make an effort to ensure my tetanus shot is up-to-date before I head out. Because tetanus is found in soil, any outdoor activity that has the potential for cuts, scrapes, or animal bites comes with the risk of tetanus infection.

Tetanus is caused by the toxin of a nasty little bacterium that gets into breaks in our skin and leads to excruciating muscle cramps and sometimes even death. Scary, right? Gardening, using outdoor machinery and getting too close to wild animals are also common sources of infection.

There is no cure for tetanus. Early recognition and prompt treatment including wound and supportive care, as well as the prompt administration of tetanus toxoid and tetanus immune globulin, may decrease the severity of the disease. The trick to protecting yourself? Getting your routine publicly-funded tetanus immunization! Infection with tetanus is uncommon in Canada because of immunization. The National Advisory Committee on Immunization recommends routine childhood immunization against tetanus and routine tetanus and diphtheria boosters for adults. Are your immunizations up to date? Don’t let tetanus cramp your outdoor style!

To find out if your tetanus immunizations are up-to-date, contact your local public health unit. Visit Northern Health’s website for local health unit contact information as well for more information on tetanus and other vaccine-preventable illnesses.

Beth Munk

About Beth Munk

Beth was born and raised as a true northerner in Prince George, where she completed her nursing degree at UNBC in 2013. She relocated to Dawson Creek two years ago to pursue her dream job in preventive public health nursing and has loved getting to know her new community. Beth loves any outdoor activity, from hiking to soccer, and has much love and appreciation for nature. In her spare time, she can be found exploring waterfalls with her fiancé in the Peace River area or enjoying time spent at her family cabin in Prince George.

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