Healthy Living in the North

Crave-worthy Kale with Cashew Cream!

A dark green kale salad with a cashew cream dressing is on a white plate.

This salad is sure to make a kale fan out of even the harshest kale-haters!

You’ve probably seen kale in the spotlight over the past few years with claims that it has nutritional super powers. Are you wondering what all the hype is about?

Kale is often labelled a “super food” because it’s full of good stuff for your body, like vitamins, minerals, and disease fighting anti-oxidants.

Some interesting facts about kale:

  • The calcium it contains is better absorbed than milk! Four-and-a-half cups of raw kale actually provide more calcium than a glass of milk! Kale packs in 435 mg. of calcium vs 322 mg. in one cup of milk. Considering kale wilts down quite a bit when it’s steamed, that’s actually not that much volume.
  • Four-and-a-half cups of raw kale has 10 grams of protein – the same as a standard serving of meat! Plus, it has more iron than steak and a fraction of the calories!
  • Gram for gram, kale has twice the amount of vitamin C than oranges!

This recipe appears on my menu plan at least once a month at home. It’s delicious with baked salmon and brown rice! I have converted non-kale eaters into kale-lovers with it on more than one occasion – my father-in-law even had seconds!

Cashew cream is a super easy, simple, and a delicious non-dairy form of “cream.” It has healthy satisfying fats for your heart and is great for people who are avoiding milk due to intolerance or allergy!

Steamed Kale with Cashew Cream
(serves 4)

Ingredients:

  • 1 large bunch of kale, washed well
  • 1/2 cup cashews, unsalted and roasted (use sun flower seeds instead if you are worried about nut allergies) *
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 1 tsp onion powder (or garlic powder)

Directions:

  1. Wash the kale. Holding the tough stalk in your hand, run your hand up the stem to rip off the leaves. This will leave the tough part behind, discard. Rip the leaves into bite sized pieces.
  2. Prepare a pot with 1 inch of water at the bottom. Place a steamer inside the pot and add the ripped leaves. Steam kale over simmering water for about 15 minutes or until tender.
  3. While the kale is steaming, prepare the cashew cream. Add the cashews, water and onion powder into the blender. Blend for about 1 minute or until smooth and creamy. Scrape down the sides as needed.
  4. Once kale is done, place in a large bowl and coat with cashew cream!

*Optional: For a really smooth cashew cream, soak the cashews in water for about 4 hours or during the day, drain before adding a fresh ½ cup of water. They will bulk up in size and blend nicely. Sunflower seeds should be soaked prior to blending.

What are some of the ways that you use kale?

Amy Horrock

About Amy Horrock

Born and raised in Winnipeg Manitoba, Amy Horrock is a registered dietitian and member of the Regional Dysphagia Management Team. She loves cooking, blogging, and spreading the joy of healthy eating to others! Outside of the kitchen, this prairie girl can be found crocheting, reading, or exploring the natural splendor and soaring heights of British Columbia with her husband!

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Seedy Saturday in Prince George

Seedy Saturday in Prince GeorgeA star is born and we named it kale. It’s funny how food trends come and go, then cycle back around in a different disguise. We must recognize that the media plays a big role in how we live and what we eat. Journal articles, newspapers and T.V. stations pooled together to target kale as their latest victim. The media has cloaked this green leaf veggie in a sequined shawl and thrown it on the run way for the world to see in a new light. But how “new” is it?

Kale has been grown and eaten around the world since 2000 B.C.  It likes to bath in bright sunlight and grows best in moist soils. It flourishes in colder climates and can withstand light frost. When grown in northern BC, it can be harvested from August into November – depending on when the snow sticks. For these reasons, it’s easy to understand why so many northerners grow and enjoy eating this hardy vegetable.

What makes it good for me?
Kale is a ‘dark green’ leafy vegetable high in vitamins, minerals. Vegetables are highly promoted in Canada’s Food Guide and bring bright color and delicious tastes to our plates. Kale can taste bitter to some people so zest it up by stir-frying it with garlic, lemon juice and pepper or add it to your winter soups! Explore the internet to find recipes that tempt your taste buds!

Now that you know what all the fuss is about, what’s the next step?
Seedy Saturdays of course! If you haven’t heard about these community events before, let me bring you up to speed. Seedy Saturday in Prince George (other communities across BC also have them in the winter) provides you with lots of great information you need to get growing a healthy garden. This is a great opportunity to possibly pick up some kale (and other) seeds and plant them for the summer. You can bring a friend along to listen to enthusiastic workshops outlining effective ways to grow your own food. By attending this event you are supporting local farmers and contributing to the local eating initiatives in BC. If you are living in an apartment and don’t have access to a garden … don’t sweat! There are often options available to rent out garden spaces. Connect with your local community gardens networks.

Seedy Saturday is organized by Community Gardens Prince George and supported by the Exploration Place as a Heritage Week event: Saturday February 22, 2014 from 10:00 am – 3:00 pm at Exploration Place, Prince George.

Celebrate local food, build community, learn new skills, and taste the difference!

Laura Ledas

About Laura Ledas

Laura is UBC Dietetic Intern completing her 10 month internship with Northern Health. Even during the Prince George winter, Laura dreams about her summer garden. She loves spending time being active outdoors and is looking forward to enjoying more seasonal vegetables as the weather begins to warm!

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