Healthy Living in the North

Foodie Friday: Enjoy B.C.’s bounty this summer

Grilled corn and tomatoes on a table.

How are you enjoying B.C.’s bounty this long weekend? Grill some local corn, pull some tomatoes from the vine, and give Marianne’s salad a try!

Summertime in B.C. is awesome! We can get outside and enjoy our favourite activities like hiking, camping, fishing, and swimming throughout our amazing province. It’s also a great time to up our healthy eating game as our gardens, farmers markets, and grocery stores are filled with fresh B.C. produce! I know I can hardly wait for those summer months when I can finally sink my teeth into B.C.-grown nectarines, raspberries, corn on the cob, and more.

There are many benefits to enjoying B.C.-grown fruits and vegetables

  • Local produce is the freshest produce you can buy – it’s picked ripe and ready to eat and delivered to you quickly, especially if it’s coming from your own backyard! This means it tastes better, looks better, and retains more nutrients.
  • Local produce is better for the environment – fruit and vegetables grown in other countries have to travel long distances and require more packaging to make it to your plate.
  • Choosing B.C. produce supports our local economies – when you choose B.C. produce at the grocery store or shop at your local farmers market you are supporting those producers in your community.

Whether you grow your own, visit your local farmers market, or shop at the grocery store, there are plenty of opportunities to enjoy the bounty of B.C. And what better time to do so than this B.C. Day long weekend! If you are hosting a BBQ, having a lakeside picnic, or going to a potluck, try out this crowd-pleasing salad. It’s packed full of flavour and uses a variety of produce you can find growing in our awesome province.

Happy B.C. Day everyone!

Salad and dressing

This grilled corn, arugula, and couscous salad is a celebration of B.C. produce. Enjoy it at your next BBQ, lakeside picnic, or family gathering!

Grilled corn, arugula, and couscous salad

Adapted from The Wellness Kitchen Cookbook, by Paulette Lambert, RD

Serves 6-8

Ingredients

Salad

  • 1 cup water
  • ⅔ cup whole wheat couscous
  • 3 cups arugula
  • 3 vine-ripened tomatoes, diced
  • 3 ears of corn, grilled and kernels cut from cob
  • 1 avocado, diced
  • ⅓ cup roasted pumpkin seeds
  • ⅓ cup dried cranberries or cherries
  • ⅓ cup grated Parmesan cheese

Dressing

  • ½ cup fresh basil leaves, packed
  • ½ cup buttermilk
  • ½ cup mayonnaise
  • Juice of ½ lemon
  • ½ tsp salt
  • ½ tsp black pepper

Instructions

  1. In a small saucepan, bring 1 cup of water to a boil. Stir in couscous, remove from heat, and allow to sit for 5 minutes. Fluff with a fork and allow to cool.
  2. In a large salad bowl, toss couscous, arugula, tomatoes, corn, avocado, pumpkin seeds, cranberries. Set aside.
  3. For the dressing, in a blender or food processor, add basil, buttermilk, mayonnaise, lemon juice, salt, and pepper. Blend until smooth.
  4. To serve, toss the salad with the dressing, then sprinkle Parmesan cheese over the top.

Tips

  • Keep the dressing and salad separate until you are ready to serve to avoid soggy arugula.
  • You can also replace the couscous with quinoa or millet to make it gluten-free.
Marianne Bloudoff

About Marianne Bloudoff

Born and raised in BC, Marianne moved from Vancouver to Prince George in January 2014. She is a Registered Dietitian with Northern Health's population health team. Her passion for food and nutrition lured her away from her previous career in Fisheries Management. Now, instead of counting fish, she finds herself educating people on their health benefits. In her spare time, Marianne can be found experimenting in the kitchen and writing about it on her food blog, as well as exploring everything northern B.C. has to offer.

Share

Farmers’ markets: Home grown community love

farmers' market veggies

Do you visit your local farmers’ market?

One Saturday afternoon, I did something that I don’t normally do – I took some time to walk around my town of Fort Nelson. It’s amazing what you see when you move slower:  I noticed, for example, how crisp and beautiful the flowers on the street corners were! During my walk, I decided to venture into the Farmers’ Market – a place that I often overlooked when driving – and I discovered the fresh locally grown foods that were displayed everywhere.

A farmer there explained to me that locally grown foods taste different than food that has been trucked up from thousands of miles away. His lettuce was picked yesterday, whereas food trucked up to us may have been picked a week ago. We also talked about how locally grown foods builds community, supports your local economy, increases food security, and reduces the environmental impact from transportation. It seems there sure is a lot to love about farmers’ markets and local food!

Farmers’ Markets feature individual vendors, mainly farmers, who set up booths, tables or stands and sell their products to the public once or twice a week at a designated place like a park or parking lot. The markets often feature produce grown naturally or organically, meats that are raised humanely on pasture, eggs and poultry, and produce.

Thanks to an increased interest in healthier foods and food security, farmers’ markets in Canada have grown. New markets appear regularly, and existing markets are seeing renewed growth.

Benefits of shopping at your local farmers’ market

Consumers love them because they can buy top-quality farm-fresh products directly from the person who produced them. Produce found at farmers’ markets is renowned for being locally grown, very fresh and produced at a much higher quality, as it’s usually organically grown with no artificial hormones. Local, fresh food is more likely to foster health and prevent illness than is heavily processed foods.  Consumers can enjoy fresh, seasonally-grown food that was produced within a drivable distance from their homes.

Farmers love them because they’re fun and let them connect with consumers who love what they sell and appreciate their hard work. They’re also an important source of income, helping farmers keep on doing what they love to do. Almost all of the money that supports local farmers goes back to the farmer, especially since the food sold at farmers’ markets undergoes a much simpler process than that sold at supermarkets.

Communities love them because they bring people together and can turn once-deserted areas into hives of activity, attracting extra business for stores and restaurants nearby.

For more information or to find a local farmers’ market, check out the BC Association of Farmers’ Markets or contact your local environmental health officer.

[Editor’s note: Don’t forget to enter the Healthy Living Week 4 Challenge and tell us about how you source local food for your chance to win a great mini freezer!]

Michael Truong

About Michael Truong

Michael is an Environmental Health Officer at the Fort Nelson Health Unit, and he really enjoys his work. He has been living in northeast B.C. for almost a year and loves his community. During the winter season, he enjoys snowshoeing with his friends and in the summer, he loves the scenery of the northern Rockies.

Share