Healthy Living in the North

World No Tobacco Day – Quit story contest

Pile of cigarettes with red ban  crossing over top

Quitting is hard, what’s your story? Share for a chance to win.

Quitting smoking is hard, what’s your story? Share it for your chance to win a Fitbit!

Today we recognize World No Tobacco Day and we can all consider making some changes in our lives towards better health. Tobacco use touches most of us, even non-smokers, as we see people in our lives light up around us and breathe in second-hand smoke. The sad truth is that tobacco use is the leading cause of preventable death –more than alcohol, car crashes, illegal drugs, murders and suicides combined.

In recognition of the challenges in quitting, we’re launching a contest where you can share your quit story and be entered to win a Fitbit wireless activity wristband. This can be your personal story quitting (or trying to quit) smoking, or your experience with someone in your life doing so. Your story may encourage someone to quit!

Share your story for your chance to win!

Need some inspiration? Here’s a short quit story from Anthony of Gitwinksihlkw via QuitNow.ca:

I worked in camps at the time, on one of my times off, I got to thinking, why do I have to go so far just to have a smoke, hiding from my nephews and nieces, telling them what I do are bad for them? I got tired of being a hypocrite, so when I returned to camp before Christmas, I just did not bring any cigarettes with me. 4 weeks in camp was the hardest time in years. But I never looked back, over a year later and I feel great. 15 years I smoked, realized I was quitting for the wrong reasons in the past. I needed to quit for myself and not for others.

Nancy Viney

About Nancy Viney

Nancy is a registered nurse working in Northern Health’s population health team. She often imagines a day when no one in northern British Columbia suffers from the harmful effects of tobacco. In her time off, she enjoys spending time with her family and friends, especially her two little grandchildren! Nancy also enjoys quilting, knitting, crocheting and many other home spun crafts.

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Teachers and parents can support children to avoid tobacco use!

If kids didn’t start smoking, the problematic use of tobacco would be a thing of the past before the end of this century!

Kids learn from an early age that tobacco is bad for their health yet every day there are young people in Canada taking their first puffs. Most smokers start using tobacco before their 19th birthday, at an average age of 13. It’s obvious that education about the harmful effects of cigarettes, cigars and chewing tobacco is not enough to stop kids from trying tobacco.

If you’re a teacher, maybe some of your students started smoking over the summer and they’re now suffering withdrawal in your classroom!

Some teens are persuaded to try tobacco by their peers if they are more influenced by this group than their parents. They may not be aware that the first puffs of a cigarette or a flavoured cigar may lead to a lifetime of nicotine addiction. Three out of four young smokers will continue to smoke into adulthood.

How can you support children and youth in your community to avoid tobacco use?

How can you support children and youth in your community to avoid tobacco use?

It only takes a few cigarettes to make changes in the teenage brain, leading to cravings and continued use of tobacco. Even though many teens do not smoke daily, they still have difficulty quitting.

Teachers and parents can support children to avoid tobacco use with conversations about:

You have a role in supporting a tobacco free community! Northern Health supports the cultural and ceremonial use of smoke, tobacco and other legal sacred plants and recognizes the benefits of traditional and spiritual uses can outweigh the potential harms.

For more info, check out QuitNow or email tobaccofree@northernhealth.ca.

Nancy Viney

About Nancy Viney

Nancy is a registered nurse working in Northern Health’s population health team. She often imagines a day when no one in northern British Columbia suffers from the harmful effects of tobacco. In her time off, she enjoys spending time with her family and friends, especially her two little grandchildren! Nancy also enjoys quilting, knitting, crocheting and many other home spun crafts.

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It’s not about the smoke

Young child holding a hockey stick and wearing a hockey helmet.

Tobacco use is a significant problem on hockey teams. As a parent, coach, or adult player, there are things you can do to prevent or stop tobacco use in sports.

It’s that time of year again. Hockey fans are busy digging out hockey gear, getting skates sharpened and taping sticks – getting ready for the first puck drop of the season.

Unfortunately, hockey has a dark secret – one that’s more commonly associated with Major League Baseball. It’s a problem you can neither see, usually, nor smell. Organized hockey has a tobacco problem that has made its way into the sport — from children as young as 13 to NHL professionals. The problem is the use of chewing tobacco or snus.

The Sport Medicine and Science Council of Manitoba recently surveyed 2,000 athletes aged 12-21 regarding substance use. The survey found that 52 per cent of male hockey players used chewing tobacco or snus. By the age of twenty, 75 per cent of Manitoba hockey players who took part in the survey reported that they had tried “chew.”

They also found that youth in grades 9-12 who participated in team sports had nearly double the risk of trying smokeless tobacco.

Another study by the Waterloo Sports Medicine Centre and University of Waterloo in 2010 found that smokeless tobacco use among Canadian hockey players appears to be common, with results comparable to similar studies in the U.S.

We’re all aware of the dangers associated with the use of smoking. However, I’d be willing to bet a bag of pucks that not many of us are aware of how many hockey players use smokeless tobacco. For hockey parents, this can be particularly troubling as the sport that they put their child in to keep them active and healthy could potentially lead to tobacco use.

But there are some things you can do about it:

  • If you’re a hockey parent, make sure that you talk to your children about tobacco. Be involved in the game and help out. Don’t just drop your child off in the dressing room and then head for the bleachers. Make sure you know what’s going on.
  • Coaches have a big influence on the players they work with. If you’re a coach, use that influence to send the message that tobacco and hockey don’t belong in the same arena.
  • If you’re a player, don’t use any form of tobacco. Whether you play in a fun recreational league or a highly competitive elite league, some young hockey player is probably looking up to you. To your children, you are the best player on the ice. Set the example for them.

Hockey organizations and municipalities can also develop, promote, and enforce tobacco-free policies that address tobacco use. Tobacco-free policies send the message that hockey and tobacco don’t mix, but to be effective, they also need to be promoted and adhered to. That means everyone from the fans in the arena bleachers to the players on the dressing room bench has to be in the game.

Hockey is a great sport with a lot of benefits for those who play; we just need to work together to bench tobacco.

If you want more information on tobacco-free sports, visit Play, Live, Be Tobacco-Free.

If you or some you know wants to quit using tobacco, they can receive free counselling, information, and support as well as free nicotine replacement products through provincial programs.

Reg Wulff

About Reg Wulff

Reg is a licensing officer with Northern Health and has his BA in Health Science. Previously, he worked as a Recreation Therapist with Mental Health and Addictions Services in Terrace as well as a Regional Tobacco Reduction Coordinator. Originally from Revelstoke, Reg enjoys the outdoor activities that Terrace offers, like mountain biking and fishing. Reg also likes playing hockey, working out, and creative writing. He is married and has two sons and believes strongly in a work/life balance as family time is important to him.

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