Healthy Living in the North

Foodie Friday: It’s Time to Celebrate!

This Foodie Friday, I want to take the time to celebrate. August is always a time of celebration in my life, since my birthday happens this month – tomorrow in fact!

August is a time of celebration for me-including my birthday!

We won’t talk about how many of those birthdays I’ve had to date – let’s just say there have been more than a few. August is also a great time to celebrate all of the local food in season here in BC. From cherries to Saskatoon berries, corn to zucchini, there is a huge variety of vegetables and fruits to suit everyone’s tastes. But this August, I also want to celebrate something a little different. Today is my  15th Foodie Friday post on the Northern Health blog, and it is also my final post as I move on to a new chapter in my life.

Foodie Friday has been an amazing series to contribute to on the Northern Health Blog. I love sharing my passion for food and cooking, and this has been a great way to reach out and share those recipes and stories. Taking a look back at my previous posts, I’ve definitely shared some of my favourite go-to recipes, including:

Just looking back on all of those makes me a little hungry. Hopefully I’ve been able to inspire you to get creating in your own kitchen, by either making one of the recipes I’ve shared, or recreating a family favourite you had forgotten about.

I did realize one thing looking back on my Foodie Friday posts – I’ve never shared a dessert recipe! Which seems crazy, because my love of cooking all started with baking and making desserts for family holiday meals. So I think it’s only fitting that this celebration post be a dessert recipe – that just so happens to use some seasonal produce that you might not expect. Happy cooking everyone!

brownies on counter

This chocolaty brownie recipe uses some seasonal produce you might not expect!

Fudgy Double Chocolate Zucchini Brownies

Makes one 8” by 12” baking pan (24 brownies)

Ingredients:

  • 2 eggs
  • 1/2 cup brown sugar
  • 1/2 cup unsweetened applesauce
  • 1 Tbsp vanilla
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 cup cocoa powder
  • 1 1/2 tsp baking soda
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 2 cups shredded zucchini (no need to peel)
  • 1 1/2 cup chocolate chips, divided
  • 1 cup chopped walnuts (optional)
brownies and knife on counter

Cool. Cut. Enjoy!

 

 

 

 

 

Instructions:

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Line an 8” by 12” baking pan with parchment paper. Set aside.
  2. In a stand mixer, beat the eggs until fluffy and pale yellow.
  3. Add in the sugar, applesauce, and vanilla. Mix on low speed until combined.
  4. In a medium bowl, combine the flour, cocoa powder, baking soda, and salt. Add gradually to the wet mixture, using low speed, so you don’t have flour flying everywhere. Once combined, remove from stand mixer.
  5. Stir in zucchini, 1 cup chocolate chips, and walnuts (if using) into the batter until combined. Spread into prepared baking dish, making sure to get the batter into the corners. Sprinkle with remaining ½ cup chocolate chips.
  6. Bake for 25 – 30 minutes. The shorter time will give you a more fudgy consistency. Cool on a wire rack. Cut into squares and enjoy!

Note: If you don’t have a stand mixer, you could also using a hand mixer or just a good ol’ wooden spoon and elbow grease!

Marianne Bloudoff

About Marianne Bloudoff

Born and raised in BC, Marianne moved from Vancouver to Prince George in January 2014. She is a Registered Dietitian with Northern Health’s population health team. Her passion for food and nutrition lured her away from her previous career in Fisheries Management. Now, instead of counting fish, she finds herself educating people on their health benefits. In her spare time, Marianne can be found experimenting in the kitchen and writing about it on her food blog, as well as exploring everything northern B.C. has to offer.

Share

Foodie Friday: More than Just a Pot of Soup

As kids, my sister and I spent many a summer day at my grandparents’ house in East Vancouver. We did all sorts of fun things – I remember lots of cards games with grandma, walks to the corner store and grocery shopping trips (turns out I’ve always loved grocery shopping), and helping out in my grandpa’s small but impressive backyard garden (he even had two rows of corn!). Sometimes my two cousins would also be there, which meant endless hours of make believe games, and our annual trip to the PNE for a day filled with rides (and a little cotton candy). But I think my best memories from those summer days came from time spent in the kitchen.

little girl sitting on grandpa's lap

Sitting on my Grandpa Bloudoff’s lap as a child.

My Grandma and Grandpa Bloudoff were of Doukhobor heritage, and this was reflected in many of the delicious foods they would make with us when we visited. We would set up assembly lines to stuff and pinch together homemade perogies, or help mix up the fruit filling for our favourite Russian fruit tarts. But one of my absolute favourite dishes was the borscht my grandparents made. As a kid, I can’t tell you why I loved it – it was just a vegetable soup. It was one of my favourite things to eat when I was at their house and I was so happy when we were sent home with jars of soup to eat later.

Fast forward to my early 20’s, when I decided I wanted to learn how to make this borscht. I had realized their borscht was different – it was tomato based, and didn’t include beets like many other borscht recipes I had seen. I needed to know their secrets! My grandpa didn’t have a recipe written down, so I convinced him we needed to spend an afternoon together where he cooked and I documented all of the ingredients and steps involved. Not only did I learn the recipe, but we also had the opportunity to reconnect as adults- all because of a pot of soup.

Both of my grandparents have since passed, and I’m so grateful to be able to look back on moments like these. Food really is that great connector of culture, relationships, and family. Now when I dig into a big bowl of my grandpa’s borscht, it not only fills my belly with hearty nourishment, but it fills me with family memories and makes me smile.

Grandpa’s Doukhobor Borscht (recipe from EvergreenEats.com)

bowl of borscht

One of my favourite dishes growing up was the borscht my grandparents made.

Makes 10 – 12 servings

Ingredients:

  • 6 cups water
  • 3 large potatoes, peeled and cubed
  • 3 stalks celery, chopped
  • 3 carrots, peeled and chopped
  • 1 cup green peas (fresh, frozen, or canned)
  • 796 mL (28 oz) can diced tomatoes
  • 2 large onions, diced
  • 1 small head cabbage, shredded or thinly sliced
  • 6 tbsp butter, divided
  • 1/3 – 1/2 cup fresh dill
  • salt & pepper to taste
  • sour cream or heavy cream, for serving (optional)

Directions:

  1. In a large soup pot or Dutch oven, cover the potatoes with the water. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to medium, and cook until just tender.
  2. Transfer the cooked potatoes to a large bowl with a slotted spoon, leaving the cooking water in the pot. Mash the potatoes with 2 tbsp butter and 1/3 of the canned tomatoes.
  3. Turn the heat on the pot up to medium-high. Add the celery, carrots, peas, 1/2 the onions, 1/2 the cabbage, 1/2 the potato/tomato mixture, and 1/2 of the remaining tomatoes to the pot. Bring to a boil then reduce heat to a simmer.
  4. Heat a skillet over medium heat. Melt 2 tbsp of butter then add the remaining onions. Cook for approximately 5 minutes until translucent (do not brown them). Add the remaining potato/tomato mixture and remaining tomatoes. Cook another 5 min then add to the pot.
  5. Heat the remaining 2 tbsp of butter in the skillet, and add the remaining cabbage. Cook until soft, but do not brown, approximately 10 min. Add to the pot.
  6. Add fresh dill to the soup, season with salt & pepper to taste. Allow to simmer for 5 more minutes. Ladle into bowls and serve with a dollop of sour cream or drizzle of heavy cream if desired.

Notes: If you have other veggies hanging around your fridge or freezer, throw them in. Green beans, peppers, spinach…maybe even some beets!

 

Marianne Bloudoff

About Marianne Bloudoff

Born and raised in BC, Marianne moved from Vancouver to Prince George in January 2014. She is a Registered Dietitian with Northern Health’s population health team. Her passion for food and nutrition lured her away from her previous career in Fisheries Management. Now, instead of counting fish, she finds herself educating people on their health benefits. In her spare time, Marianne can be found experimenting in the kitchen and writing about it on her food blog, as well as exploring everything northern B.C. has to offer.

Share

Foodie Friday: Dinner from Down Under

I love creating the many family recipes I grew up with on a regular basis, but I also love experiencing the tried and true recipes from other people’s families. It’s fun to learn about the flavour combinations and food traditions they enjoy, and then find ways to incorporate them into my own cooking repertoire. Bonus points when they are simple to make and use common ingredients!

Way back when I finished university, I picked up and moved to Australia for 6 months, where I lived with a local family. Eating in Australia wasn’t too much of a culture shock, but I did have to learn some of the lingo. While I was there, I learned what a sausage sizzle was, the proper way to eat Vegemite, how to perfectly cube a mango, and that “tasty cheese” is in fact just a medium cheddar cheese. I made sure to share some culinary tidbits with them as well – like the fact that peanut butter is delicious with jam (turns out many Australians don’t eat peanut butter with sweet things).madarin, chicken

As a temporary member of my host family, I enjoyed family dinners with them. One of my favourites that they made often was a simple chicken stir-fry with carrots and celery topped with almonds and mandarin oranges. I don’t know that it was particularly Australian, but that doesn’t matter. I loved the bright, fresh flavours, and it was a real crowd pleaser. I watched my “Aussie mum” make it so many times that I took the reins making it for the family on a few occasions. While I’ve done a little adapting from the original recipe, it is something I still continue to make and enjoy to this day!

Mandarin Orange & Almond Chicken Stir-fry

Serves 4

Ingredients:

  • 1 can (11 oz or 312 g) mandarin oranges packed in juice, drained and juice reserved
  • 2 tbsp soy sauce
  • 2 tbsp white vinegar
  • 2 tbsp corn starch
  • 2 tsp chicken bouillon
  • 1 – 2 tsp sugar
  • 1 tsp sesame oil
  • 3/4 cup blanched whole almonds
  • 1 tbsp canola oil
  • 1 medium onion, thinly sliced
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 3 boneless, skinless chicken breasts, cubed
  • 3 carrots, peeled and thinly sliced
  • 4 celery stalks, thinly sliced
  • sesame seeds, for garnish

Instructions:

  1. In a small bowl, whisk together the reserved orange juice, soy sauce, vinegar, corn starch, bouillon, sugar, and sesame oil. Set aside.
  2. Heat a large skillet or wok over medium heat. Add the almonds and toast until golden brown. Remove from pan and set aside.
  3. Turn the heat up to medium high. Add the oil to the pan, then add the onion and garlic. Stir fry for 1-2 minutes. Add the chicken, and stir fry for 2-3 minutes.
  4. Add carrots and celery to the pan, and continue to stir fry for 2-5 minutes, until the chicken is cooked through and the vegetables are cooked but crisp. Add the almonds back to pan.
  5. Turn the heat down to medium low. Add the sauce mixture, and cook until thickened.
  6. Serve over rice, quinoa, or noodles, topped with the mandarin orange slices and sesame seeds.

Note: Don’t add the mandarin oranges until serving, otherwise they will fall apart in the stir-fry!

Marianne Bloudoff

About Marianne Bloudoff

Born and raised in BC, Marianne moved from Vancouver to Prince George in January 2014. She is a Registered Dietitian with Northern Health’s population health team. Her passion for food and nutrition lured her away from her previous career in Fisheries Management. Now, instead of counting fish, she finds herself educating people on their health benefits. In her spare time, Marianne can be found experimenting in the kitchen and writing about it on her food blog, as well as exploring everything northern B.C. has to offer.

Share

2nd annual Dietitians Day pro tips!

Group photo

Northern Health dietitians from Haida Gwaii to Fort St. John gather together!

With Nutrition Month in full swing, it’s time to celebrate the people who bring credible, evidence-based nutrition information to the public: today is Dietitians Day!

Registered dietitians (RDs) are university-trained food and nutrition experts who work in a variety of settings like health care, the community, with business, and in private practice. We translate scientific research into practical solutions for individuals, families, and communities. We love to share our tips on healthy eating while celebrating the social and cultural roles that food plays in our lives!

Did you know that registered dietitians are the only regulated nutrition professionals in British Columbia? This means we are accountable to our regulatory college (College of Dietitians of BC), where we are required to follow professional codes of conduct and ensure our training is kept up to date. The regulatory college is there to protect the public and is your point of contact if you have questions or concerns around an RD’s conduct.

In what is quickly becoming a yearly tradition for Dietitians Day at Northern Health, I’ve once again reached out to my fellow Northern Health dietitians (and a few of our dietetic interns) to share their “Pro Tips” for Nutrition Month. Check them out below and if you are hungry for more, be sure to follow Northern Health on Twitter for nutrition information all month long. Happy Dietitians Day!

What’s your Dietitians Day pro tip?

  • Emilia (Terrace): Enjoy family meals often. People who eat together, eat better!
  • Kelly (dietetic intern, Prince George): Try roasting your veggies. It’s an easy way to bring out their natural sweetness!
  • Lise (Terrace): Jazz up your water! Try cucumber, berries, or mint. Kids can help too!
  • Emilia (Terrace): Make your own take-out. Try pizza or taco night & let everyone pick their own veggie toppings!
  • Marianne (Prince George): Be passionate about food. Grow, cook, or taste something new!
  • Flo (Terrace): Diets don’t work. Eat & enjoy a variety of foods for health & pleasure.
  • Laurel (dietetic intern, Terrace): All foods fit! Eat for your physical, mental, and spiritual health.
  • Tamara (Prince George): Get the kids involved. Let them choose a new recipe & make it together.
  • Olivia (Prince George): Bored with plain water? Try flavoured herbal teas – they are good hot or cold!
  • Flo (Terrace): Behaviour determines health, not weight. Eat intuitively, move joyfully & love your body today.
  • Darcie (Prince George): Dietitians are passionate about food & nutrition! We help translate nutrition science for everyday life.
  • Marianne (Prince George): Enjoy regular meals & snacks. Feed yourself – provide, don’t deprive!

Looking for more information on registered dietitians? Check out Dietitians of Canada.

Marianne Bloudoff

About Marianne Bloudoff

Born and raised in BC, Marianne moved from Vancouver to Prince George in January 2014. She is a Registered Dietitian with Northern Health’s population health team. Her passion for food and nutrition lured her away from her previous career in Fisheries Management. Now, instead of counting fish, she finds herself educating people on their health benefits. In her spare time, Marianne can be found experimenting in the kitchen and writing about it on her food blog, as well as exploring everything northern B.C. has to offer.

Share

Nutrition Month: What are the ingredients for trustworthy nutrition facts?

apple, orange, lime, red pepper

Is the nutrition information you read online trustworthy?

Did you know that at least half of Canadians get their nutrition information from sources on the internet? Whether you are looking for information on picky eating, digestive issues, or managing a chronic condition like diabetes, it’s important to know that the information you are getting is credible and evidenced-based.

There’s a lot of nutrition information available out there, but let’s face it – not everything we read online is true. So how can we find nutrition information we can trust?

March is Nutrition Month, and registered dietitians from Northern Health (and across the country!) are ready to share their tips for healthy eating – and to help Northerners separate nutrition fact from fiction.

Here are 5 questions you can ask to help determine if the nutrition information you are reading online is trustworthy:

  • Is the website promoting a quick fix or a miracle cure?
  • Is the website trying to sell me something instead of providing education?
  • Are the website authors qualified to give nutrition information? (Tip – registered dietitians are the only regulated nutrition professionals in BC)
  • Is the information derived from personal opinion rather than scientific evidence?
  • Do the facts on the website sound too good to be true?

If you answer “yes” to most of these questions, that information might not be reliable. Which means it would be best to take a pass!

Fortunately in B.C., everyone can access credible nutrition information from registered dietitians at HealthLinkBC. You can speak directly to a dietitian Monday to Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. by calling 8-1-1, or you can email a dietitian any time of day by visiting healthlinkbc.ca/healthy-eating.

You can also get nutrition tips and delicious healthy recipes from local dietitians on the Northern Health blog (blog.northernhealth.ca) every #FoodieFriday, during Nutrition Month, and all year long!

This article was adapted from materials found on the Dietitians of Canada Nutrition Month website: nutritionmonth2017.ca.

Marianne Bloudoff

About Marianne Bloudoff

Born and raised in BC, Marianne moved from Vancouver to Prince George in January 2014. She is a Registered Dietitian with Northern Health’s population health team. Her passion for food and nutrition lured her away from her previous career in Fisheries Management. Now, instead of counting fish, she finds herself educating people on their health benefits. In her spare time, Marianne can be found experimenting in the kitchen and writing about it on her food blog, as well as exploring everything northern B.C. has to offer.

Share

Foodie Friday: Cozy up to your freezer

I love to watch cooking shows on TV. It’s a source of entertainment and culinary inspiration for me. But there is one thing that irks me every time I hear it on those shows – when a chef speaks negatively about cooking with frozen food.

I agree that fresh foods are awesome to cook with. But the reality is most of us don’t have access to all the fresh foods we want all the time. When it comes to healthy eating, frozen is not a 4 letter word (literally and figuratively)!

I think my freezer is actually one of my most used kitchen appliances, following closely behind my fridge and stove. It definitely helps me get healthy and delicious meals on the table in my house at least a few times a week!

cherry smoothie in glass

A combination of BC cherries and chocolate is sure to please your taste buds!

There are 3 ways I like to put my freezer to use:

  1. Vegetables and fruits: I always have a selection of frozen vegetables and fruits in my freezer, so that even if I don’t get to the grocery store, I can make sure to get some produce into my meals. Frozen veggies and fruits are just as nutritious as fresh, are available year round, and have already been washes/chopped/peeled making them super convenient!
  2. Preserving the harvest: Maybe you have a backyard garden, bulk buy at the farmer’s market, go berry picking every summer, or hunt your own game. If you want to enjoy those foods throughout the year you’ll need a way of storing them. Freezing them is a great way to go!
  3. Batch cooking: From soups to casseroles, pizza dough to muffins, I always have some extra ready-to-eat snacks and meals in my freezer. Batch cooking doesn’t take much more effort than cooking a meal for my family of 2, so it’s a no-brainer! These are lifesavers on busy days where I get home late from work and the last thing I want to do is cook.

Because I always have frozen fruits waiting for me in the freezer, I know I can always make a quick breakfast smoothie on my way out the door. Here’s one of my favourites, featuring BC cherries and a hint of chocolate.

Cherry Bomb Smoothie

Serves 1 as a meal or 2 as a snack.

Ingredients

  • 1 cup frozen, pitted cherries
  • 1 cup milk (dairy or non-dairy beverage)
  • ½ cup plain yogurt
  • 1 tbsp cocoa powder
  • Splash of vanilla extract (optional)

Instructions

  1. Add all ingredients to your blender. Whiz away until it’s completely blended and smooth. Enjoy!
Marianne Bloudoff

About Marianne Bloudoff

Born and raised in BC, Marianne moved from Vancouver to Prince George in January 2014. She is a Registered Dietitian with Northern Health’s population health team. Her passion for food and nutrition lured her away from her previous career in Fisheries Management. Now, instead of counting fish, she finds herself educating people on their health benefits. In her spare time, Marianne can be found experimenting in the kitchen and writing about it on her food blog, as well as exploring everything northern B.C. has to offer.

Share

Foodie Friday: Give your comfort food a boost!

Plate of macaroni and cheese

Mac & cheese is easy to make from scratch and, with a few tweaks, you can amp up the nutrition and taste!

The snow has been falling and the days are getting shorter. Yes, winter has arrived in northern B.C.! These chilly evenings have me turning to soups, stews, and hearty comfort foods.

Comfort foods often get a bad rap when it comes to nutrition. We often think of comfort foods as being heavy, rich, and lacking in the vegetable department. But there isn’t any good reason they have to be this way. Most classic comfort foods can be easily modified to boost their nutrition and still be warm and satisfying enough for even the coldest winter night.

Mac & cheese is probably one of my favourite comfort food meals to make at home. Not only is it an easy dish to make from scratch, but with only a few little tweaks, you can amp up the nutrition and taste:

  • It’s easy enough to switch out regular macaroni for whole grain pasta to add some extra fibre to your meal.
  • Using an old or aged cheddar allows you to use less cheese while keeping that cheesy flavour.
  • And I always add some vegetables to my mac & cheese to make it a complete meal.

Some great vegetable choices include:

  • steamed cauliflower or broccoli
  • frozen peas or corn
  • sautéed mushrooms
  • puréed butternut squash
  • dark leafy greens, like spinach or kale

Here, I’ve used baby kale in my favourite mac & cheese recipe because it has a more mild flavour than regular kale and it requires less prep. If baby kale isn’t available, you can easily substitute chopped fresh, frozen, or canned kale instead.

Casserole dish with mac & cheese

Marianne’s recipe calls for kale, but cauliflower, broccoli, peas, corn, mushrooms, or squash are all great mac & cheese additions!

Oh Kale Yeah! Mac & Cheese

Recipe from Evergreen Eats

Serves 4-6

Ingredients

  • 3 cups whole grain pasta (such as macaroni, rotini, or penne)
  • 4 tbsp butter
  • 4 tbsp all-purpose flour
  • 2 cups milk
  • 1 cup shredded old cheddar (the older the better!)
  • 1 tbsp grainy mustard
  • 1 tsp Worcestershire sauce
  • salt & pepper to taste
  • 4 cups of baby kale, packed
  • 1/2 cup herb and garlic croutons, crushed

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 375 F.
  2. Cook pasta per package directions, until al dente.
  3. While pasta is cooking, melt butter in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add flour, stir and cook for 1 minute, without browning.
  4. Lower the heat, and gradually whisk in milk. Stir until bubbles form around the edges, and sauce thickens. Do not boil.
  5. Stir in cheddar cheese, mustard, and Worcestershire sauce. Add salt and pepper to taste. Keep warm over low heat until pasta is cooked.
  6. Drain pasta, and add it to the cheese sauce, along with the baby kale. Stir until combined and kale has wilted slightly. Transfer to baking dish, and top with crushed croutons.
  7. Bake for 15-20 minutes, until top is crispy and golden brown.

Notes:

  • No croutons? No problem! You can use breadcrumbs, panko, or even crushed crackers or a few potato chips.
  • As the cheese, mustard, and Worcestershire sauce are all salty, taste your sauce before adding any extra salt – you might find you don’t need it!
Marianne Bloudoff

About Marianne Bloudoff

Born and raised in BC, Marianne moved from Vancouver to Prince George in January 2014. She is a Registered Dietitian with Northern Health’s population health team. Her passion for food and nutrition lured her away from her previous career in Fisheries Management. Now, instead of counting fish, she finds herself educating people on their health benefits. In her spare time, Marianne can be found experimenting in the kitchen and writing about it on her food blog, as well as exploring everything northern B.C. has to offer.

Share

Foodie Friday: Fall is in the air

September is here, which means fall is just around the corner. I know many people are never ready for summer to end, but this is definitely my favourite time of the year. The trees start to turn colour, there is a refreshing breeze in the air, and still plenty of daylight to enjoy the outdoors. It’s also a great time to enjoy local BC produce – you can often find a mix of those summer staples like peaches and zucchini mixed with fall favourites like squash and Brussel sprouts.

Fall is also the perfect time to get in the kitchen and do some baking – no worries about heating up the house too much like in the summer! I love to bake homemade muffins for grab-and-go breakfasts and snacks. They are probably one of the least fussy things to bake, making them a great choice for a beginner baker. And when you make your own, you can amp up the nutrition by using whole grains like oats, and using less sugar than store bought ones.

A fast, favourite recipe with a hint of summer flavour!

Feeling inspired to do a little baking? Why not give this easy oatmeal peach muffin recipe a go! Not only willyou get prepped with some easy breakfasts for back-to-school, but you also get to hang on to the taste of summer a little while longer – in case you aren’t as excited for fall as I am!

Oatmeal Peach Muffins

Makes 12 muffins

IngredientsOatmeal Peach Muffins

  • 1 cup oats
  • 1 1/2 cup whole wheat flour
  • 1/4 cup ground flax seeds
  • 2 tsp baking powder
  • 1/2 tsp baking soda
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 1/2 tsp cinnamon
  • 1/8 tsp nutmeg
  • 2 eggs, lightly beaten
  • 1 cup milk
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1/4 cup melted butter or vegetable oil
  • 1 tsp vanilla
  • 2 medium peaches, peeled, and chopped

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. Lightly grease muffin pan, or use paper liners.
  2. In a large bowl combine oats, flour, flax seeds, baking powder, baking soda, salt, cinnamon, and nutmeg.
  3. In a medium bowl, combine eggs, milk, sugar, melted butter, and vanilla. Mix well so that the sugar is dissolved.
  4. Stir the peaches into the dry mixture, so they are just coated.
  5. Add the wet ingredients to the dry, and mix until just combined. A few lumps are okay.
  6. Divide the batter evenly between the 12 muffin cups. Bake for 20 – 25 minutes, or until golden brown and a toothpick inserted comes out clean.

Tip: Make these muffins all year round by substituting 1 cup chopped frozen peaches for the fresh. Or try your favourite berries, such as blueberries or raspberries.

Marianne Bloudoff

About Marianne Bloudoff

Born and raised in BC, Marianne moved from Vancouver to Prince George in January 2014. She is a Registered Dietitian with Northern Health’s population health team. Her passion for food and nutrition lured her away from her previous career in Fisheries Management. Now, instead of counting fish, she finds herself educating people on their health benefits. In her spare time, Marianne can be found experimenting in the kitchen and writing about it on her food blog, as well as exploring everything northern B.C. has to offer.

Share

Foodie Friday: Summer salads are for sharing

Three food dishes on a picnic table.

Whether it’s a potluck at a park or a backyard BBQ, food is a great way to connect with the people in our lives!

It’s that time of year again – the sun is shining, the kids are (almost) done school, and the desire to enjoy the outdoors is in full effect. Yes, summer is here! One of my favourite things about summer is the opportunity to gather with family and friends to enjoy the outdoors and share delicious food. It might be a backyard BBQ, a picnic at the lake, or a potluck celebration at the park. Food is such a great way to connect with the people in our lives. It provides us with the opportunity to get together and share not only our favourite dishes, but also our thoughts, ideas, culture and traditions. Plus, we often eat better when we eat with others.

Salads are often my go-to dish when I’m asked to bring something to share, and this coleslaw recipe provides a great twist on a summertime classic. It replaces the typical creamy dressing (not such a great idea to have out in the hot sun) with a sweet and tangy one, and includes some less traditional veggies like kale and green pepper. Not only is it delicious and nutritious, it also won’t heat up your kitchen, can be made ahead of time, keeps well, and makes enough to feed a hungry crowd. Try it out at your next summer BBQ!

Sweet & Tangy Big Batch Coleslaw

Adapted from “Mustard Spiked Make Ahead Coleslaw” from Sask Mustard.

Serves 10 or more.

Ingredients

  • 8 cups finely shredded cabbage (green, red, or both)
  • 4 cups finely shredded kale
  • 3 green onions, thinly sliced
  • 2 large stalks celery, thinly sliced
  • 2 large carrots, grated
  • ½ green bell pepper, minced
  • ¼ cup white sugar
  • ¾ tsp salt

Dressing

  • ½ cup white vinegar
  • ¼ cup white sugar
  • 1 ½ tsp yellow prepared mustard
  • 1 ½ tsp yellow mustard seed
  • 1 tsp celery seed
  • ½ tsp dried dill
  • ¼ cup canola oil
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
Coleslaw

This mustard-spiked coleslaw keeps well, feeds a crowd, and ditches the typical creamy dressing. Try it out!

Instructions

  1. Combine cabbage, kale, green onion, celery, carrot, green pepper, sugar, and salt in a large bowl. Stir well. Let stand 2-3 hours.
  2. Combine vinegar, sugar, mustard, mustard seed, celery seed, and dill together in a saucepan. Bring to a full boil, stirring to dissolve sugar. Remove from heat.
  3. Stir in oil and garlic into dressing mixture.
  4. Pour dressing over cabbage mixture. Refrigerate covered for at least 4 hours or overnight, mixing a couple of times.

Note: Will keep well in the fridge for at least a week.

Looking for some other summer salads? Try one of these:

Taste the Rainbow Potato Salad

Grilled Corn, Arugula, and Couscous Salad

Marianne Bloudoff

About Marianne Bloudoff

Born and raised in BC, Marianne moved from Vancouver to Prince George in January 2014. She is a Registered Dietitian with Northern Health’s population health team. Her passion for food and nutrition lured her away from her previous career in Fisheries Management. Now, instead of counting fish, she finds herself educating people on their health benefits. In her spare time, Marianne can be found experimenting in the kitchen and writing about it on her food blog, as well as exploring everything northern B.C. has to offer.

Share

Foodie Friday: Make your own take-out!

Pizza

Pizza can be a well-balanced meal – include whole grain dough, lots of veggies, your favourite protein, and skim-milk mozzarella and you’ll have all 4 food groups!

It’s Nutrition Month and this year, we’re Taking a 100 Meal Journey. It’s all about making small changes and sticking with them one meal at a time.

Maybe you’ve decided to eat more vegetables, make a weekly meal plan, or cook from scratch more often. Well, I’ve got a great way to help you stay on track for all 3 of those healthy eating goals! When I plan dinners for the week, I like to designate one night as “Make Your Own Take-Out” night.

We all have our own favourite take-out options – it could be burgers, tacos, pizza, or fish n’ chips. But, let’s face it, these aren’t always the most nutritious choices we can make. Take-out foods are often higher in salt and fat, are made with refined grain products, and tend to be sparse on the vegetables. Sure, they are convenient, especially on busy weeknights. And as a once-in-a-while treat, they aren’t so bad. But when take-out dinners become a regular habit, they can impact not only our health, but also take a toll on our wallets.

Baked pizza

Bake your pizza on a baking sheet or, for a crispy pizza crust, invest in a pizza stone!

Instead of swearing off your favourite take-out foods, why not try making some of them at home? That way, you can control the ingredients and portion sizes, and save a little money while you’re at it. Pizza is one of my favourite “Make Your Own Take-Out” meals to make. Give it a try! It’s a great way to increase your whole grain and vegetable intake. You can keep it traditional or get creative with your vegetable toppings – use up whatever you have on hand. We’ve discovered that corn, cabbage, and even sweet potato make tasty toppings! Bonus: it’s also a fun meal to make with the family! Try making mini pizzas and letting everyone choose their own toppings.

Below is my go-to pizza dough recipe. It’s super easy to make, incorporates whole grain flour, and you can make it ahead of time. Keep a batch in the freezer and you’ll have dough ready for a quick weeknight meal.

Big-Batch Whole Wheat Pizza Dough

Recipe adapted from Dietitians of Canada

Makes enough for two 12-15 inch (30-38 cm) pizza crusts

Ingredients

  • 2 packages (7 g each) active dry yeast
  • 2 cups whole wheat flour
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • ½ tsp salt
  • ½ tsp granulated sugar
  • 1½ cups lukewarm water
  • ½ tsp olive oil
Pizza slice

Once you’ve topped your pizza, bake in the oven at 400 C for 15 minutes for the perfect at home pizza.

Instructions

  1. In the bowl of a stand mixer, combine yeast, whole wheat flour, all-purpose flour, salt, and sugar. Attach dough hook and mixer bowl to mixer. With mixer running on low speed, gradually add water; knead until dough is smooth and elastic, about 10 minutes. (You can also knead the dough by hand, or even use a food processor)
  2. Turn off mixer, and pour oil down side of bowl. Set to low speed for 15 seconds to coat inside of bowl and cover dough lightly with oil. Remove mixer bowl and cover loosely with plastic wrap.
  3. Let rise in a warm, draft-free place until doubled in size, about 2 hours.
  4. Punch down dough and cut in half to make two balls. Place each ball in an airtight freezer bag and freeze for up to 3 months, or roll out for immediate usage.
  5. To roll out, place dough ball on a floured work surface and form into a circle. Roll out until dough reaches 12 to 15 inches (30 to 38 cm) diameter.

Tip: Try adding dried or fresh herbs to the pizza dough to give it even more pizazz! Basil, parsley, oregano, and rosemary are all great options!

Once you’ve topped your pizza, bake in the oven at 400 C for 15 minutes for the perfect at-home pizza.

Marianne Bloudoff

About Marianne Bloudoff

Born and raised in BC, Marianne moved from Vancouver to Prince George in January 2014. She is a Registered Dietitian with Northern Health’s population health team. Her passion for food and nutrition lured her away from her previous career in Fisheries Management. Now, instead of counting fish, she finds herself educating people on their health benefits. In her spare time, Marianne can be found experimenting in the kitchen and writing about it on her food blog, as well as exploring everything northern B.C. has to offer.

Share