Healthy Living in the North

Valemount knows granting season

Kids and adults on x-country skis.

X-country skiing gives the winter some much needed outside boost!

As you’re probably aware, it’s the spring IMAGINE granting season, and applications are coming in from all over Northern BC. Through our social media promotions of the program, I was lucky enough to connect with Rita Rewerts of the Canoe Valley Community Association (CVCA) in Valemount BC. During her tenure with the CVCA, Rita has applied and been selected for two IMAGINE Community Grants. What a pro!

We chatted about her background, the mountains in the area, how rad Valemount is… oh and how the grants have affected Valemount’s community. Here’s what she had to say!

How long have you been in Valemount and what’s your involvement in the Canoe Valley Community Association?

I moved to Valemount from Vancouver Island (Nanaimo) 25 years ago! I’m now happily retired from my job as a homecare nurse. Currently, I’m the vice president for the Association, and one of my main roles is to act as a liaison between the board and employees for programming. It’s awesome – how can you not love doing things for the kids!?

Cooking equipment on a table in a kitchen.

IMAGINE the creations this cooking equipment will whip up!

What did the IMAGINE grants help with and how were they successful?

We’ve applied for two grants and started two great programs: x-country skiing and a cooking program. I think both of the programs have been very successful, and our community has benefited too!

For our skiing program, we partnered with Yellowhead Outdoor Recreation Association (YORA) to help instruct participants on how to ski. The IMAGINE grant helped us purchase the skis and gear, but wow, is it ever expensive to buy skis for growing kids! So, we opted to buy a wide range of sizes, from youth to adult. Now as a lasting bonus, we’re able to offer skis and gear to the community during the winter for a small fee. It’s been great, and hugely beneficial for the community. Kids, adults and whole families love to get out and ski. Skiing for everybody!

For the cooking program, the grant helped us go from small to big. The idea was to partner with the high school to teach cooking from scratch, but it became too successful for the space we were using. So we moved to the Lions Club, where the IMAGINE grant helped buy cooking equipment like mixers, pans, and utensils.

It’s been very rewarding to see this idea take flight. The kids love cooking. Right from six years old, they take on Food Safe, learn about canning, baking cakes, cookies, whole meals – you name it. Our next project to enhance the program is to build a permaculture garden to grow our own ingredients!

Is there another IMAGINE grant application in your future?

Yes, there sure is! I’m in the process for writing another grant for this cycle. We really believe that programming should be based on what community interests are, and you have to be in constant contact with the community to find out what they want. So for this cycle, we polled kids for ideas through the school! There seems to be a real hunger to learn how to draw and paint. So we will be looking into artsy things: art classes, easels, paints, broad spectrum things. Should be exciting!

Do you have any advice for someone who’s thinking about applying for a grant?

Don’t be afraid! If you have the passion and a good idea, just go for it. Northern Health has been really helpful through all of the granting process, so you don’t really have much to worry about! What’s the worst that can happen? Your idea might be the next best thing for the whole community, which is so positive. Just do it!

Apply today!

Grant applications are being accepted March 1 through to March 31. Check out the application guide and form and get started! If you’re looking for tips on applying, check out our handy blog, IMAGINE Community Grants: Key factors for success in community!

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Northern Health MRI Improvements: Rikki Furmanek

“We also are able to accommodate surrounding areas such as Fort Nelson, Chetwynd, Taylor – people don’t have to travel very far, especially in the wintertime, so that’s great.”

In this video, Rikki Furmanek, Northern Health X-ray Technician, mentions the benefits that a new MRI machine brings to her hometown, Fort St. John, and what it does for the Northeast!

You can also see how the MRI machine was installed, which includes a big lift through a window at the hospital.

Thanks to additional provincial investments in MRI services across the province, Northern Health is expected to increase the number of MRIs performed by 70% over last year, and an additional 102 MRI hours of operation have been added (between the Fort St. John, Prince George, and Terrace MRI locations).

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Your flu shot: be strong like Tom

Thomas showing his muscles.
Be strong like Thomas: get your flu shot.

Did you know, this year’s flu shot is working better than past years? Official estimates have the flu shot hovering around 70% effectiveness, far better than recent years.

So, what’s your hesitation? Not enough time? Hate getting a needle? Not sure where to get one? If you’ve used any of these an excuse to avoid the flu shot, I’d like to introduce you to Thomas.

Thomas is 7, he has a dog named Kodiak, he does judo, and he wants to ­be an electrician when he gets a little older.

Besides being a pretty cool kid, Thomas knows the flu shot is the best way to protect himself from the flu. What he didn’t know, but he learned this year, is that it also helps protect everybody else! Kids like him, babies, the elderly, and those with vulnerable immune systems are all impacted by him getting the shot!

Thomas and a local news crew.
“Just my arm was a little bit sore but that was ok because I got to be on the news.”

Here’s what he had to say about the experience:

“I was a little nervous because I was afraid it would hurt a lot. But it didn’t hurt until after, and just my arm was a little bit sore but that was okay because I got to be on the news.”

Thomas is one tough kid!

Looking to be like Tom and get the shot? Find a flu clinic in no time on the Immunize BC website.

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Northern Health MRI Improvements: Shyr Chui and Danita Braun

“Fifteen minutes later I got a call from the MRI booking office, and they told me they wanted me in the next day in the evening… and I was dumbfounded, because I was expecting it to be a 6 week wait for this appointment!”

In this video, we hear from patient Danita Braun, who was thrilled to hear the wait time of her MRI appointment was drastically cut down. Getting the MRI done sooner also meant a change in her care plan which she was thrilled to hear!

Also featured, Shyr Chui, Northern Health Radiologist, mentions how scanning hours have also changed, adding evening times and weekends!

Thanks to additional provincial investments in MRI services across the province, Northern Health is expected to increase the number of MRIs performed by 70% over last year, and an additional 102 MRI hours of operation have been added (between the Fort St. John, Prince George, and Terrace MRI locations).

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IMAGINE (granting) that

It’s that time of year again, and we’re very excited! The month of March means an opportunity for anyone to take a healthy community idea and work towards making it a reality! That’s right, the spring IMAGINE Community Grants cycle has begun.

I started working at Northern Health a couple years ago, and one of my favourite things to watch has been IMAGINE Grants coming to life. There’s been so many awesome ideas put into communities, here are some of my favourites!

Youth skateboarders posing with their helmets on.

If You’re Gonna Play… Protect the Brain
The Prince Rupert RCMP worked on their goal to get at least 75% of bikers and skateboarders wearing helmets.

Children posing with signs that spell out Thank You for Supporting the Ark.

Get Outside Families
The Treehouse Housing Association taught children to help prepare healthy, on-the-go snacks to share with their parents while they explored Telkwa’s forests as families!

A view from the back of a dragon boat canoe, with paddles in the air.

Dragon Boating for All
The Quesnel Canoe Club offered community groups the chance to experience the sport of dragon boating. The project promoted safe, healthy, active living and aims to encourage more people to join the sport of paddling.

Young students in the classroom holding up books about dog education.

Dog Bite Safety Prevention
2022 students in 13 communities engaged in discussion around injury prevention through safe and positive interactions with dogs and learned how to be a responsible dog guardian. Tools and resources were provided to all participants to take home to share with their families.

You can view many more IMAGINE Grants on our IMAGINE map!

Apply Today!

You might be thinking, what do all of these grants have in common? Well, they’re healthy, good for the community, and honestly, not much else – but that’s the beauty of it! From community gardens, to skate parks, to healthy meal classes, to roller dance lessons… The canvas is blank and the colourful paints are available! No ideas are bad ideas, you just have to apply.

Grant applications are being accepted March 1 through to March 31. Check out the application guide and form and get started! If you’re looking for tips on applying, check out our handy blog, IMAGINE Community Grants: Key factors for success in community!

Good luck!

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Northern Health MRI Improvements: Marina Downs and Margaret Kostyshyn

“This has increased patient happiness, and the morale of our technologists.”

In this video, Marina Downs, Northern Health Diagnostic Imaging Manager, speaks on how the addition of the MRI machine in Terrace has reduced patient wait times and travel, directly affecting the experience of both staff and patients.

Margeret Kostyshyn, a recent UHNBC patient, mentions how her MRI experience was “very positive,” and how the reassuring staff took away her initial fears of the process.

Thanks to additional provincial investments in MRI services across the province, Northern Health is expected to increase the number of MRIs performed by 70% over last year, and an additional 102 MRI hours of operation have been added (between the Fort St. John, Prince George, and Terrace MRI locations).

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Northern Health MRI Improvements: Ken Winnig and Karen Eldridge

“About a year ago, we were only able to do about 7,500 MRIs. Today, we’re on target to do over 13,000.”

There’s some pretty exciting MRI news circulating throughout the North! Since the installation of the two new machines in Terrace and Fort St. John, and a new replacement unit in Prince George, the northern region has seen some pretty incredible results.

In this video, Ken Winnig, Northern Health Regional Director of Diagnostic Services, explains the benefits of the new machines. Additionally, hear from Karen Eldridge, a recent patient, who’s been positively impacted!

Thanks to additional provincial investments in MRI services across the province, Northern Health is expected to increase the number of MRIs performed by 70% over last year, and an additional 102 MRI hours of operation have been added (between the Fort St. John, Prince George, and Terrace MRI locations).

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Catching up with Myles Mattila

“I am not a mental health professional by any means, I’m just a hockey player.”

Myles Mattila in his hockey uniform.

Myles Mattila may not have the credentials, but he’s got the passion – enough of it to be a heck of a mental health advocate. Founder of MindRight and a former Northern Health Community Health Star (see our original story on him here!), Myles now lives in Kelowna BC, playing with the Kelowna Chiefs of the Kootenay International Junior Hockey League. Although hockey plays a huge part in his life, so does mental health awareness. With Bell Let’s Talk Day coming up, it was the perfect time to catch up with Myles and see what’s changed in the past couple years.

Remind us, what is MindRight?

MindRight is a place where athletes who are experiencing any range of mental health challenges can visit and find support. Whether it’s professional resources for coaches or players, peer to peer support, or just having someone to talk to, MindRight can help.

What’s coming up? Anything exciting?

We’re planning for a MindRight app, which is great because it provides some more accessibility for youth athletes, and really can open up the door to other leagues. I think that’s the overall goal, to take MindRight and spread it into bigger leagues so more players have access to it.

What role do you think coaches, team managers, and sport organizers can play in mental health promotion/ prevention?

I think they play a huge part. If you watch my video on how MindRight sort of began, I talk about my teammate who was going through some ups and downs. I saw him acting differently, and I was worried.

“His smile was gone, but he kept saying, “’I’m fine.’”

So, I brought it to my coach’s attention, someone I looked up to at the age of 13, and thought had all the answers. Unfortunately, coaches don’t always know the best procedure, and my coach actually took hockey away from him. That was devastating.

Hopefully MindRight can be used by both coaches and players so they can find resources that help. I think coaches and organizations should let players know it’s ok to speak up, or even better, encourage mental health awareness. It can be as formal as having a speaker come in and present, or as easy as using green tape on your stick and gear to promote Mental Health Awareness Week.

In your experience do coaches, or peers, know how to support someone that does speak out for help?

Before, not as much, but now, yes, I think so. Older coaches can sometimes have different mindsets, probably because mental health wasn’t a well-known topic to them in their youth. They have that “old time hockey” mentality.

It’s kind of hard to ignore the issue now because it’s being recognized so often. Schools champion it, pro athletes speak to it. One in five people are affected in some way by mental health. Awareness and learning is key to changing how we act and fight the stigma attached to it. Coaches and organizations can change – my past coach changed once he heard my story!

Many sports organizations/clubs have zero tolerance substance use policies meaning someone can be kicked out or excluded from positive peer groups and social connections. Do you think there is a better way to handle substance use?

It’s tricky. In my opinion, I don’t think booting players from a team or organization resolves the problem, but I can also recognize the risk of substances within a team atmosphere. A person’s mental health has to be considered, but the team has to be protected as well.

I think best way to handle that sort of situation is to really dive into the team, figure out what’s going on and create a plan. If you can find out what’s wrong, and if that person is willing to be helped and looking for change, they should be given that opportunity.

“At the end of the day, a team is like a family. You don’t want to see your family go through hard times.”

Recognizing everyone has mental health, and that it is not a fixed state, how can sport contribute and foster to positive mental health in youth?

Sports provide an incredible atmosphere for growth. If you break it down, you’ve got a common goal, a team connection and lots of interaction – it’s a really underrated and cool opportunity to create a positive mental health support network.

Why is it so important for youth to talk about their feelings and experiences?

Honestly, it’s simple. You can’t get help without speaking to the right people. I think there have been cases where youth athletes reach out to the wrong people, and get shamed for talking about mental health. It makes them shut down and stop looking for help.

If you reach out to the right people who know how to respond and help correctly, people at places like Foundry, you can get the real facts you need and go from there.

What do you believe is the best way to educate youth on mental health and substance use?   

I’ve always thought that presentations play a big part in educating, but in my experience, the peer to peer network is the best, which is why sports and teams are so perfect for educating. If someone within a team atmosphere can be an ambassador, the guys listen.

I’ve always admired Kevin Bieksa and his advocacy for his friend and teammate who passed away, Rick Rypien. When young athletes see pros speaking about themselves and teammates, it’s relatable. We’re all playing the same game, so it’s not too hard to imagine that some of us may be going through the same problems.

Make sure to check out MindRight today. We wish Myles all the best moving forward with this hockey career and his mental health advocacy!

And don’t forget to nominate your Community Health Star now!

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We did it for the gram

A collage of photos on our Instagram feed.

That’s right! Northern Health now has an Instagram account.

Why Instagram?

Instagram is the perfect place for us to show off photos of our amazing region, our super talented staff, and, of course, tons of health information. A healthier north means being as available as possible to the people around us, and Instagram provides another great way for us at Northern Health reach out to our region and beyond!

Have your say!

We’re always open to suggestions, and we’d like to know what you’d like to see more of. If you have any idea of what you would like to see come through our Instagram account, please let us know (via email at healthpromotions@northernhealth.ca or DM us!)

Give us a follow on all our channels

Although our Instagram is brand new, you can also find us on many other social media feeds. Check them all out. You never know, the health tips and information you learn today might just impact your tomorrow!

Instagram: @northernhealthbc

Facebook: Northern Health

Twitter: Northern_Health

YouTube: Northern Health BC

Thanks for following!

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Are you showing up for your city?

Members of the Fort St. James community who attended the hospital announcement.
What a great turnout for Fort St. James’s new hospital announcement!

When is the last time you went to an event to support your community?

I racked my brain, combed through it back and forth for memories of civic events attended, and, I have to say… it was pretty sparse. I make sure to attend Remembrance Day each year, but other than that, I’ve been pretty well absent from public gatherings of any kind in my hometown of Prince George, BC.

But, that was before I went to Fort St. James, BC.

When I found out a colleague and I would be sitting in on the Minister of Health’s announcement of the much needed new hospital, I really anticipated a small turnout. “It’s a sunny morning,” I reasoned to myself. “People will show…” Well, like most days when something is planned outside, the sunny morning slowly morphed into a bitter, frosty, wind-chilled afternoon.

Uh oh, I thought, there goes our turnout. I honestly didn’t expect anyone to come freeze for an announcement of a new building, even such an important one.

But, as the clouds drifted in, so did the people: Two by two, then four by four, then a school bus of kids carrying drums! Older people, young people, and everyone in between. I couldn’t believe how many came, and each of them with a general excitement and interest for what was happening.

The sense of their community and civic pride, I’ve got to say: it impacted me. Neighbours, colleagues, friends, families, all chatting, all willing to stick it out in the cold for each other – that’s a pretty cool feeling, and it leaves you wanting more.

I realized, maybe that’s the point of going to these community events. It doesn’t have to be the most interesting or relevant thing to you or your life, but it could mean something much more to the person living across the street. That mentality makes for a connected, healthy community. Thank you Fort St. James for showing me the power of your community! Going forward, I’m going to make more of an effort to attend my own community’s announcements and gatherings.

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