Healthy Living in the North

Chetwynd’s First Annual World Mental Health Day: “Walk and Talk”

A smiling woman and a smiling man wearing sunglasses, both in high vis vests, pose for a selfie outside on a dirt road.

L-R: Organizers Charla Brazeau, Primary Care Nurse, Interprofessional Team 1; and Stan Fraser

Each year, organizations across the globe observe World Mental Health Day on October 10, a day that started in 1992 to promote mental health advocacy and to educate the public on relevant issues and topics.

This year, to commemorate the day, NH staff and residents in Chetwynd, BC organized the first annual Walk and Talk. Despite the brisk weather, dozens of people came out to show their support and help end the stigma.

The 26 km trek from Moberly Lake to Chetwynd encouraged participants to talk about their personal relationship with mental health, ask questions, and show that no one has to suffer alone.

Organized by Charla Brazeau, Primary Care Nurse, Chetwynd General Hospital, and local mental health advocate, Stan Fraser, the Walk and Talk had support from Northern Health, Saulteau Frist Nation, Chetwynd RCMP, Gerry’s Groceries, and Tim Hortons.

A man in a high vis vest walks along the side of a road with a young girl who is looking up at him.

Stan Fraser walks with the event’s attendees.

“Mental health is often overlooked as a ‘silent illness’,” says Charla. “This event was to make people aware that they are not alone in having a mental illness and there is always someone there who will be there for you and have a listening ear.”

Organizers are thrilled with the event’s success and hope to see even more people make it out next year.

Two smiling women pose for a selfie outside on a road lined with snow and trees.

L-R: Oshen Walker, Aboriginal Patient Liaison; and Charla Brazeau, Primary Care Nurse, Interprofessional Team 1

A view of a tree lined lake, hills on the horizon, and the sun shining in the sky.

The spectacular view from along the walk.

Two smiling women pose for a selfie inside a vehicle with a case of bottled water.

L-R: Oshen Walker, Aboriginal Patient Liaison; and Leona Clark, Saulteau First Nation Community Health Nurse.

A police SUV with lights and an unmarked police truck on the road next to a walker.

Walk and Talk participants get an official RCMP escort.

Shelby Petersen

About Shelby Petersen

Shelby is the Web Services Coordinator with Indigenous Health. Shelby has over five years of experience working in content development and digital marketing. After graduating with a degree in Political Science from UNBC, Shelby moved to Vancouver where she pursued a career in digital marketing. Most recently, Shelby was the Senior Content Developer and Project Manager with a digital advertising agency in Vancouver, British Columbia. Born and raised in Prince George, Shelby is thrilled to be back in the community and spending time outside enjoying everything that the North has to offer.

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Looking back at Orange Shirt Day: photo round up

This Monday marked the seventh annual Orange Shirt Day.

Orange Shirt Day is a day to remember, to witness, and to honour the healing journey of residential-school survivors and their families, and to demonstrate a commitment to processes of reconciliation.

NH staff and physicians were out in full-force, wearing their brightest orange shirts to show support for residential school survivors. Check out the photos below to see who participated!

Four women stand in front of an office building, wearing orange shirts.

Northern Health staff, in Prince George, pose for Orange Shirt Day (left to right: Anne Scott, Regional Manager, Corporate and Program Communications, Corporate Communications; Shelby Petersen, Coordinator, Web Services, Indigenous Health; Sanja Knezevic, Communications Advisor, HR, and; Bailee Denicola, Communications Advisor, Primary & Community Care and Clinical Programs.

Staff wear their orange shirts, standing on a stair case in a hospital.

Staff of Xaayda Gwaay Ngaaysdll Naay – Haida Gwaii Hospital and Health Centre wear orange to help mark the seventh annual Orange Shirt Day.
(left to right: Jackie Jones, Cleaner/Laundry Worker/Housekeeper/Cook, Housekeeping/Food Services; Louis Waters, Health Information Clerk, Patient Registration; Laurie Husband, Team Lead, Interprofessional Team 1; Abby Fraser, Cleaner / Laundry Worker, Housekeeping / Laundry + Linen; Patti Jones, Forbes Pharmacy; Gwen Davis, Charge Technologist, Multi-Function Lab; Nadine Jones, Administrative Assistant; Ashley Beauchamp, Medical Lab Aide, Multi-Function Lab; Magdalena Saied, Forbes Pharmacy; Kerry Laidlaw, Site Administrator, Northern Health – NW.)

A woman and child proudly wear their orange shirts.

Prince Rupert Regional Hospital Aboriginal Patient Liason (APL) Mary Wesley and her granddaughter Hannah Lewis pose for Orange Shirt Day.

A woman smiles, wearing her orange shirt.

Victoria Carter, Lead for Engagement and Integration, Indigenous Health, poses in Prince Rupert, British Columbia.

 

Shelby Petersen

About Shelby Petersen

Shelby is the Web Services Coordinator with Indigenous Health. Shelby has over five years of experience working in content development and digital marketing. After graduating with a degree in Political Science from UNBC, Shelby moved to Vancouver where she pursued a career in digital marketing. Most recently, Shelby was the Senior Content Developer and Project Manager with a digital advertising agency in Vancouver, British Columbia. Born and raised in Prince George, Shelby is thrilled to be back in the community and spending time outside enjoying everything that the North has to offer.

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September 30 is Orange Shirt Day

A middle-aged woman wearing an Orange Shirt Day shirt that says "every child matters" holds an orange frame and a sign. The sign also says, "every child matters."

Victoria Carter, Lead Engagement and Integration
Indigenous Health, at the Kitsumkalum Orange Shirt Day in 2016.

You may notice more people than usual wearing orange shirts today!

It’s Orange Shirt Day – a day to remember, to witness, and to honour the healing journey of residential-school survivors and their families, and to demonstrate a commitment to processes of reconciliation.

The day celebrates the resilience of Indigenous Peoples and communities and provides an opportunity for all people in Canada to engage in discussions or provide acknowledgement and support in addressing the brutal legacy of the residential school system.

Orange Shirt Day was born out of Phyllis’ story. In 1973, when Phyllis (Jack) Webstad was six years old, she was sent to the Mission School near Williams Lake.

Phyllis’ story reminds us everyday of the children that were taken from their families and sent to residential schools. Orange Shirt Day is an opportunity to set the stage for anti-racism and anti-bullying policies for the coming school year.

Residential schools are a dark part of Canadian history and learning about them can be hard for many people. As hard as it may be for some to learn about residential schools and our shared colonial history, it’s critical to acknowledge and recognize these topics in a spirit of reconciliation and for future generations of children.

If you’re interested in learning more about residential schools, here are some helpful resources:

Shelby Petersen

About Shelby Petersen

Shelby is the Web Services Coordinator with Indigenous Health. Shelby has over five years of experience working in content development and digital marketing. After graduating with a degree in Political Science from UNBC, Shelby moved to Vancouver where she pursued a career in digital marketing. Most recently, Shelby was the Senior Content Developer and Project Manager with a digital advertising agency in Vancouver, British Columbia. Born and raised in Prince George, Shelby is thrilled to be back in the community and spending time outside enjoying everything that the North has to offer.

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Creating Visual Narratives of Care and Cultural Safety with Lisa Boivin

Lisa Boivin and her art is pictured.

Lisa Boivin shown with some of her colourful and vibrant art.

Lisa Boivin, a member of Deninu Kue First Nation in the Northwest Territories, completed her Doctoral Studies at the Rehabilitation Sciences Institute within the University of Toronto’s Faculty of Medicine. Her upcoming workshop called Creating Visual Narratives of Care and Cultural Safety is coming to Prince George.

Lisa started drawing four years ago to help her get through her classes. During an interview with CBC’s Unreserved, Lisa remarked that her introduction to art isn’t as romantic as one would assume.

“There really is no long, romantic history of longing to learn how to paint – it was literally just hating what I was studying.”

After one of her professors expressed concern that her doodling was disruptive to the class, Lisa began to use digital painting apps on her computer – creating her signature style of using bright, vibrant colours on a black backdrop.

As a Sixties Scoop survivor, art soon became an even greater refuge for Lisa. The Sixties Scoop is a part of Canadian history when Indigenous children were taken from their families and adopted out to white families – some as far away as Europe.

As Lisa learned about colonialism, cultural displacement, and intergenerational trauma in the classroom, she was also reconnecting with her father and processing her own personal history. When it came time to submit an assignment, Lisa found that words were not sufficient to express what she had to say. Instead, Lisa asked if she could hand in an arts-based project. Feedback was positive from her professor. So, she continued using painting as a teaching tool.

Today, Lisa works as an arts-based health care educator. Using image-based storytelling (an Indigenous teaching style), Lisa educates current and future health care professionals on the obstacles that Indigenous patients face as they navigate the Canadian health care system.

Lisa’s presentation can be broken down into three sections:

  • The first section provides a personal account of Canada’s colonial history as it relates to the health outcomes of Lisa and her family.
  • The second and third sections include reflexive, arts-based exercises that use image-based story telling to explore nation building in the workplace and to create a visual narrative of the clinical and personal self.

The afternoon of learning will begin with a tour of the Two Rivers Gallery REDRESS exhibit, followed by a lunch for participants and Lisa’s three-section workshop.

Organized by the Health Arts Research Centre, with help from the National Collaborating Centre for Indigenous Health and Northern Health (NH), this free afternoon workshop takes place on Friday, October 4, 2019 from 12:00 pm to 4:00 pm at the Two Rivers Gallery. NH staff and physicians are welcome to register, but space is limited! Before registering, NH staff should discuss attending with their manager if this event takes place during regular work hours, or if coverage or travel would be required.

Shelby Petersen

About Shelby Petersen

Shelby is the Web Services Coordinator with Indigenous Health. Shelby has over five years of experience working in content development and digital marketing. After graduating with a degree in Political Science from UNBC, Shelby moved to Vancouver where she pursued a career in digital marketing. Most recently, Shelby was the Senior Content Developer and Project Manager with a digital advertising agency in Vancouver, British Columbia. Born and raised in Prince George, Shelby is thrilled to be back in the community and spending time outside enjoying everything that the North has to offer.

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Fort Nelson HIV Awareness Week: using language to break down barriers

A table of HIV Awareness materials is pictured.

The table of materials at Fort Nelson’s HIV Awareness Week helps educate attendees.

Language is a powerful thing. It connects to who we are and how we see ourselves. So, when someone takes the time to reach out in your own language — instead of expecting you to understand theirs — it makes a difference.

For the past five years, the community of Fort Nelson has held an HIV Awareness Week. For the most recent one, held the week of April 29, 2019, they decided to mark the occasion by doing something special for the Indigenous members of their community.

Working together with the Fort Nelson Aboriginal Friendship Society, they translated their yearly presentation on HIV into Dené, the most prominent Indigenous language in the area.

“We had one or two Elders who teared up,” said Jennifer Riggs, Regulated Pharmacy Technician and the key organizer for the event. “They were so happy that we took the time — I don’t think it mattered what the conversation was about — but they were so happy that we did it in their language. They really appreciated that we made an effort.”

Fort Nelson, located in Northeastern BC, has a large Indigenous population: roughly 14% of the population identify as Indigenous.

“This event is important in Northern BC, especially in our very isolated towns,” says Jennifer. “Indigenous people have a higher prevalence of HIV … and they aren’t getting that information. We’re trying to bring people up to date.”

This lack of information was the reason Jennifer and her team put in the time and effort to translate the presentation. She wants to ensure that they aren’t left out of the conversation. She hopes to do even more next year by translating the presentation into another Indigenous language.

HIV isn’t something that people usually get excited about, but for Fort Nelson, the event has become something to look forward to. Jennifer estimates that attendance has quadrupled since the initial event five years ago. She hopes that with continued outreach to the Indigenous communities in the area, attendance will continue to grow.

“So many people attend and we’ve come full circle, from where people weren’t talking about sex, to now having condom races at the fire department! It’s becoming normal conversation.”

For Jennifer, this is what it’s all about: to make conversations about topics such as HIV, sex, sexual orientation, and addiction less painful for people to talk about, and to make them part of everyday conversation.

“I want it to be a regular thing. I want continual education and training available all the time. It shouldn’t be a big deal.”

Mark Hendricks

About Mark Hendricks

Mark is the Communications Advisor, Medical Affairs at Northern Health. He was raised in Prince George, and has earned degrees from UNBC (International Business) and Thompson Rivers University (Journalism). As a fan of Fall and Winter, the North suits him and he’s happy to be home in Prince George. When he's not working, Mark enjoys spending time with his wife, reading, playing games of all sorts, hiking, and a good cup (or five) of coffee.

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National Indigenous Peoples Day events in Northern BC

A feather floats on calm water.

Indigenous Peoples Day is June 21!

June 21 is National Indigenous Peoples Day! Across the country, Canadians have the opportunity to recognize and celebrate the unique heritage, diverse cultures, and outstanding contributions of First Nations, Inuit, and Métis peoples.

First Nations, Inuit, and Métis peoples share many similarities, but they each have their own distinct heritage, language, cultural practices, and spiritual beliefs.

June 21, the summer solstice, was chosen as National Indigenous Peoples Day in cooperation with Indigenous organizations and the Government of Canada. The date was specifically chosen because many Indigenous peoples and communities celebrate their culture and heritage on or near this day – significant because of the summer solstice and because it’s the longest day of the year!

Here in Northern BC, there is no shortage of events that you and your family can attend! From Beading and Bannock in Chetwynd to a Moose Calling Contest in Smithers, families can enjoy good food and fun events while celebrating contemporary and traditional Indigenous cultures.

Here’s a selection of events happening right here in the North!

Dawson Creek and District Hospital (2 pm-3 pm)

  • Traditional Pow Wow dancers (featuring tiny tots, youth, and adult dancers)
  • Rock painting with local Métis Artist, Wayne LaRiviere
  • Bannock

Dze L K’ant Friendship Centre Hall – Smithers (11 am-3:30 pm)

  • Soapberry whipping
  • Bannock demonstration
  • Children’s activities
  • Moose calling contest
  • Cedar weaving demonstrations
  • And more!

Chetwynd Hospital Board Room (10 am-12:30 pm)

  • Beading and Bannock with Geraldine Gauthier
  • Tea will be served

If you’re not sure where to find information on local Indigenous Peoples Day events in your area, check out this list of events on the Indigenous Health website! Be sure to use the hashtag #NIPDCanada to join in on the fun online and show just how excited you are!

Shelby Petersen

About Shelby Petersen

Shelby is the Web Services Coordinator with Indigenous Health. Shelby has over five years of experience working in content development and digital marketing. After graduating with a degree in Political Science from UNBC, Shelby moved to Vancouver where she pursued a career in digital marketing. Most recently, Shelby was the Senior Content Developer and Project Manager with a digital advertising agency in Vancouver, British Columbia. Born and raised in Prince George, Shelby is thrilled to be back in the community and spending time outside enjoying everything that the North has to offer.

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Meet our Northern biking champions: Cache from Mackenzie

Cache, wearing his helmet and on his bike, have stopped on a ramp on the street.

Cache is ready to take a jump during Ride to Work & School Week.

For Bike to Work & School Week (May 27-June 2), we are featuring a number of community members who are champions for cycling, whether it be to work, school, or commuting around town.

Today we’ll meet Cache Carlson, a grade 4 student at Morfee Elementary School in Mackenzie.

What do you like most about biking?

The more I ride to school, the more I can find and hit little jumps along the way!

What do you think your community needs in order to make it easier for more people to bike to work or school?

Biking trails… bicycle specific routes.

What type of bike do you ride?

A fitbike 18: BMX!

Any bike tips you’d like to share?

Do preventative maintenance on your bike. I like to fix worn out or broken things on my bike as soon as I notice them.

***

Sounds like Mackenzie might have a budding bike mechanic! A big thank you to Cache for sharing how much fun he has on his ride to school!

Gloria Fox

About Gloria Fox

Gloria Fox is the Regional Physical Activity Lead for Northern Health’s Population Health team. She is a graduate of the University of Alberta’s faculty of PE & Recreation, and until beginning this role has spent most of her career working as a Recreation Therapist with NH. She has a passion for helping others pursue an optimal leisure lifestyle and quality of life at all stages of their lives. In order to maintain her own health (and sanity), Gloria enjoys many outdoor activities, including hiking, camping, canoeing, and cycling, to name a few. She is a self-proclaimed foodie and her life’s ambition is to see as much of the world as possible.

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Growing our own: From high school to health care in the South Peace

A woman and two young males sit behind a table at the Northern Health booth at the South Peace Secondary School career fair. A C.P.R.-simulation dummy is on the table along with Northern Health pens and star-shaped stress balls.

Grade 10 students Scott Cournoyer and Ben Powell learn about health care careers from Emaly Klomp, Dawson Creek & District Hospital Emergency Room Manager, at the annual South Peace Secondary School Career Fair.

In Dawson Creek, Northern Health (NH) staff are partnering with South Peace Senior Secondary (SPSS) to make sure young people, who are planning for the next phase in their lives, are considering careers in health care.

“We want high school-age kids to know that a career with Northern Health can be an easy answer to the difficult question: what will I be when I grow up?” says Kendra Kiss, South Peace Health Services Administrator. “Health care offers well-paying jobs, excellent benefits, and the opportunity to make an impact at the personal and community level – all in a person’s home community.”

For the last two years, Dawson Creek & District Hospital (DCDH) has given SPSS’s students the chance to gain work experience hours. Up to eight grade 11 and 12 students have rotated through different departments of the hospital, getting a taste of different roles. After high school, the NH-SPSS partnership continues to impact former students and the health care system.

“At least three students from the program have gone into medical programs and are coming back to work as employed students over the summer,” says Kendra. “Seeing students who were wide-eyed high schoolers, trying to find their way in the world come back with purpose is inspiring. As a hospital, we see great benefits, as do the students who gain real-world experience and grow professionally and personally.”

Along with bringing students to the hospital, staff are engaging SPSS students at their school. On March 14, Kendra and Emaly Klomp, DCDH’s Emergency Department Manager, joined other local employers at the school’s annual career fair. Students from Dawson Creek, Chetwynd, and Tumbler Ridge had the opportunity to ask questions about health care careers. NH’s booth (pictured) featured the “CPR for 2 Minutes” contest. Only one student was able to make a full minute, but everyone had a great time trying.

If you have questions about working at Northern Health, including about local partnerships like the one above, please contact NH’s Recruitment department:

Mike Erickson

About Mike Erickson

Mike Erickson is the Communications Specialist, Content Development and Engagement at Northern Health, and has been with the organization since 2013. He grew up in the Lower Mainland and has called Prince George home since 2007. In his spare time, Mike enjoys spending time with friends and family, sports, reading, movies, and generally nerding out. He loves the slower pace of life and lack of traffic in the North.

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All Native Basketball Tournament 2019 – The Diamond Anniversary

Person holding sign with their most valuable teaching.

My most valuable teaching…” Learning how to deal with loss. I learned not to isolate and at 72 years old I joined an Elders’ walking club. 3 times a week!”

From February 10-16, the 2019 All Native Basketball Tournament celebrated its diamond anniversary in Prince Rupert. The 60th annual tournament and cultural event drew participants and fans from as far as Ahousat on Vancouver Island to Hydaburg, Kake, and Metlakatla.

The original tournament was called the Northern British Columbia Coast Indian Championship Tournament and ran from 1947-1953. The inaugural 1947 tournament was held in the Roosevelt Gymnasium at what is now École Roosevelt Park Community School, attracting about 400 spectators. Due to lack of interest, the first version of the tournament was cancelled in 1953, but by 1959, the tournament was rekindled with a new name – The All Native Basket Ball Tournament (ANBT). The first ANBT was held on March 2, 1960 and continues to the present day as British Columbia’s largest basketball tournament and the largest Indigenous cultural event in Canada.

This year, the tournament saw thousands of spectators cheer nearly fifty teams competing in four divisions: intermediate, seniors’, masters’, and women’s.

All but one of the defending champions reclaimed their titles with the PR Bad Boys losing out to Skidegate Saints 85-83. The seniors’ division title went to the Kitkatla Warriors who beat out newcomers, Pigeon Park All-Stars, 102-85. The Hydaburg Warriors took home their fifth straight masters’ division title beating out the Lax Kw’alaams Hoyas 98-74. Finally, two-time defending champs, Kitamaat Woman’s Squad, bested the Similkameen Starbirds 45-36 to take home the women’s division title for the third time.

The Northern Health sponsored Raven Room

Person holding sign with their most valuable teaching.

My most valuable teaching… “Respect one another and respect your Elders; share and be thankful for what you have.”

Northern Health is proud to have partnered with the First Nations Health Authority (FNHA) to sponsor the Raven Room. The Raven Room is intended to be a peaceful space for Elders to rest and take a break from the bustle of the tournament.

Elder Semiguul (Fanny Nelson) was the room’s official host while many Elders and others dropped in for k’wila’maxs tea, coffee, baked goods with locally-harvested berry jam, fruit, and good conversation. Northern Health and FNHA staff and volunteers were on hand to offer wellness checks and advice about blood pressure, blood sugars, and cholesterol. Over 200 people visited the Raven Room and 191 people received wellness checks.

The Raven Room and wellness checks are designed to create a safe space for community members to learn about health care from a perspective outside the mainstream health care environment which can often be intimidating and uncomfortable for many. This more public space provides a safer and perhaps more familiar way to access services because others are there to witness and offer support.

Person holding sign with their most valuable teaching.

My most valuable teaching… “Pass my knowledge to the next generation.”

When asked what they enjoyed most about the Raven Room, one visitor responded, “I think that this service is an excellent idea – as it is hard to try and get to see your Dr. [The] waiting period at hospital is so out of this world.”

This year’s Raven Room theme was “the strength and wisdom of Elders.” Many Elders offered “their most valuable teaching” or “what they want to share with the younger generation” for an Elder’s Wisdom Wall (see photos).

FNHA also used other rooms to host great workshops about sports physiotherapy and taping, painting, and cedar weaving. Tournament participants and spectators were also invited to meet with traditional healers throughout the week.

Congratulations to all competitors and all those involved in organizing this event!

Person holding sign with advice for the younger generation.

What do you want to share with the younger generation? “Respect everyone! Compassion! Abuse of drugs and alcohol – say no!”

Woman holding sign with her advice for the younger generation.

What do you want to share with the younger generation? “Never give up, LOVE yourself is to respect yourself as a person. Find help when life pressure gets to hard. We DO LOVE you. you are not alone.”

Shelby Petersen

About Shelby Petersen

Shelby is the Web Services Coordinator with Indigenous Health. Shelby has over five years of experience working in content development and digital marketing. After graduating with a degree in Political Science from UNBC, Shelby moved to Vancouver where she pursued a career in digital marketing. Most recently, Shelby was the Senior Content Developer and Project Manager with a digital advertising agency in Vancouver, British Columbia. Born and raised in Prince George, Shelby is thrilled to be back in the community and spending time outside enjoying everything that the North has to offer.

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Are you showing up for your city?

Members of the Fort St. James community who attended the hospital announcement.
What a great turnout for Fort St. James’s new hospital announcement!

When is the last time you went to an event to support your community?

I racked my brain, combed through it back and forth for memories of civic events attended, and, I have to say… it was pretty sparse. I make sure to attend Remembrance Day each year, but other than that, I’ve been pretty well absent from public gatherings of any kind in my hometown of Prince George, BC.

But, that was before I went to Fort St. James, BC.

When I found out a colleague and I would be sitting in on the Minister of Health’s announcement of the much needed new hospital, I really anticipated a small turnout. “It’s a sunny morning,” I reasoned to myself. “People will show…” Well, like most days when something is planned outside, the sunny morning slowly morphed into a bitter, frosty, wind-chilled afternoon.

Uh oh, I thought, there goes our turnout. I honestly didn’t expect anyone to come freeze for an announcement of a new building, even such an important one.

But, as the clouds drifted in, so did the people: Two by two, then four by four, then a school bus of kids carrying drums! Older people, young people, and everyone in between. I couldn’t believe how many came, and each of them with a general excitement and interest for what was happening.

The sense of their community and civic pride, I’ve got to say: it impacted me. Neighbours, colleagues, friends, families, all chatting, all willing to stick it out in the cold for each other – that’s a pretty cool feeling, and it leaves you wanting more.

I realized, maybe that’s the point of going to these community events. It doesn’t have to be the most interesting or relevant thing to you or your life, but it could mean something much more to the person living across the street. That mentality makes for a connected, healthy community. Thank you Fort St. James for showing me the power of your community! Going forward, I’m going to make more of an effort to attend my own community’s announcements and gatherings.

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