Healthy Living in the North

Clinical simulation helps nursing school instructors provide better training

Simulation Debriefing Training Workshop Facilitators and Attendees.
Simulation Debriefing Training Workshop Facilitators and Attendees. L – R: Michael Lundin, Coordinator, Northern Clinical Simulation, Northern Health and Workshop Facilitator; Jasit (Joey) Johal, CNC Instructor, Quesnel Campus; Suzanne Betts, CNC Instructor, Prince George Campus; Shelby Montgomery, CNC Instructor, Prince George Campus; Danielle Brandon, CNC Instructor, Prince George Campus; Stacey Conway, CNC Instructor, Prince George Campus; Lyndsy McFadden, Yvonne Mott, CNC Instructor, Prince George Campus; Tara Green, CNC Instructor, Prince George Campus; Lizann Schultz, CNC Instructor, Quesnel Campus; Liza Voliente, CNC Instructor, Prince George Campus; Nancy Esopenko, CNC Instructor, Prince George Campus; Anita Muchalla Yeulet, CNC Instructor, Prince George Campus; Tanya Barrett, Clinical Nurse Educator, Northern Health and Workshop Facilitator; Crystal Patenaude, CNC Instructor, Prince George Campus; Renee Peterson, CNC Instructor, Quesnel Campus.

For health sciences students, clinical simulation is an important part of learning. It lets them practice on realistic mannequins known as simulators without risk to patients. And of course, their instructors’ knowledge of simulation techniques is key.

On January 11, Northern Health’s Clinical Simulation Program hosted 16 nursing instructors from the College of New Caledonia (CNC) for a simulation training session.

The all-day session took place at the University Hospital of Northern British Columbia (UHNBC) in Prince George, and instructors from CNC’s Prince George and Quesnel campuses participated.

The training focused on the debriefing part of simulation education. This is when the instructor and students discuss the simulation session after it’s over, discussing what went well and areas for improvement. This is the first time a debriefing workshop has been offered by Northern Clinical Simulation.

“This session is part of the evolution of simulation use in year 2 at the CNC campuses,” says Nancy Esopenko, a CNC instructor in the Northern Collaborative Baccalaureate Nursing Program. “In 2018 we began a pilot project for students around simulation. We wanted everyone to take part in simulation during their medical or surgical rotations at UHNBC and GR Baker Hospital in Quesnel. Before this, the students’ exposure to simulation varied. We wanted all our students to learn using simulation.”

By taking this training, instructors are increasing their knowledge around simulation. This makes the sessions with students even more valuable.

“Debriefing is a very important part of simulation training and overall learning. It enhances the experience for both instructors and students. This training has given our instructors the tools to have difficult conversations,” says Nancy, who’s also Year 1 & 2 Coordinator in the nursing program. “It was very valuable to watch experienced instructors word their questions. We appreciated the chance to practice before teaching students.”

The experience has been beneficial for both new and experienced instructors: “They’re more confident in their approach and communication style,” says Nancy. “All the instructors learned new ways to engage in conversations and provide feedback. They liked playing the student role during the simulation scenarios, too – it let them see things from the student perspective.”

The commitment shown by the CNC instructors in taking part in these workshops will a go a long way in training future nurses for years to come.

Tamara Reichert

About Tamara Reichert

Tamara is the communications advisor for the innovation and development commons at Northern Health where she works on a number of projects with the research, quality improvement, clinical simulation, and education teams. Born and raised in Prince George, Tamara grew up on a ranch where she rode horses, played with farm animals, built forts, and raided the family garden. She enjoys spending time travelling, hiking, cooking, reading, and cheering for her favourite sports teams.

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UNBC PhD student awarded national fellowship to study stroke care

Daman Kandola with Northern Health supervisor Jessica Place and academic supervisor Davina Banner.
L-R: Dr. Jessica Place, Executive Lead, Regional Chronic Diseases; Daman Kandola, recipient of the HSI Fellowship; and Dr. Davina Banner, academic supervisor.

UNBC PhD candidate Daman Kandola was recently awarded a 2018/2019 Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) Health System Impact Fellowship (HSIF). She’s one of only three PhD fellows in BC, and 20 from across Canada. Daman’s research focuses on the delivery of stroke-related care across the Northern Health region.

Daman is the first person from UNBC to be awarded a CIHR HSIF fellowship and is excited to be recognized.

“It’s amazing to have the importance of this work recognized on a national level and to celebrate some of the research we are doing at UNBC,” she said.

This 1-year fellowship supports Northern Health’s mission of promoting health and providing health services to Northern and rural populations. The fellowship is funded jointly by Northern Health and CIHR’s Institute of Health Services and Policy Research. The goal is to train the next generation of scientists in hybrid research and policy careers to work in health systems to address challenges in health service delivery, clinical care, and innovation.

Broken into three phases, Daman’s study looks at the different ways to arrive at the hospital and the time taken to receive stroke care. Sites she’s studying are ones with computerized tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans — they include the University Hospital of Northern BC in Prince George, GR Baker Hospital in Quesnel, Dawson Creek and District Hospital, Fort St. John Hospital, Mills Memorial Hospital in Terrace, and Prince Rupert Regional Hospital. The study is expected to finish in fall 2019.

To understand patient experiences, Daman’s interviewing stroke survivors and their family members.

“This information is very meaningful to learn about each person’s experience. Numbers don’t tell the full story, so hearing directly from those affected is important,” she said. “Findings from this study may be relevant to similar small urban, Northern, rural, and remote regions. We hope that this work will improve health services for acute and time-sensitive conditions including stroke.”

Daman also said she’s grateful for the expertise of her mentors, including academic supervisor Dr. Davina Banner, Northern Health supervisor Dr. Jessica Place and cardiac and stroke lead Kristin Massey. “We’re fortunate to have a wonderful team support this fellowship including patient partners,” says Daman.

If you’d like further information about this work, or if you or someone you know has had a stroke in the last two years and is interested in sharing their stroke experience, contact Daman at kandola@unbc.ca.

Tamara Reichert

About Tamara Reichert

Tamara is the communications advisor for the innovation and development commons at Northern Health where she works on a number of projects with the research, quality improvement, clinical simulation, and education teams. Born and raised in Prince George, Tamara grew up on a ranch where she rode horses, played with farm animals, built forts, and raided the family garden. She enjoys spending time travelling, hiking, cooking, reading, and cheering for her favourite sports teams.

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We did it for the gram

A collage of photos on our Instagram feed.

That’s right! Northern Health now has an Instagram account.

Why Instagram?

Instagram is the perfect place for us to show off photos of our amazing region, our super talented staff, and, of course, tons of health information. A healthier north means being as available as possible to the people around us, and Instagram provides another great way for us at Northern Health reach out to our region and beyond!

Have your say!

We’re always open to suggestions, and we’d like to know what you’d like to see more of. If you have any idea of what you would like to see come through our Instagram account, please let us know (via email at healthpromotions@northernhealth.ca or DM us!)

Give us a follow on all our channels

Although our Instagram is brand new, you can also find us on many other social media feeds. Check them all out. You never know, the health tips and information you learn today might just impact your tomorrow!

Instagram: @northernhealthbc

Facebook: Northern Health

Twitter: Northern_Health

YouTube: Northern Health BC

Thanks for following!

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Clean hands are your best defence against the flu

Hands washing with soap.
The most effective and easiest way to prevent the spread of the flu is to have good hand hygiene.

Flu season is once again in full force. Influenza, or the flu, is a virus that causes fever, cough, headache, sore muscles or joints, fatigue or weakness, and a sore throat.

It’s spread through contact and fluid transfer, including breathing in the virus if someone sneezes or coughs, and doesn’t cover their mouth. It can also be shared by dirty surfaces and dirty hands. The most effective and easiest way to prevent the spread of the flu is to have good hand hygiene.

There are two ways to keep your hands clean. The first is just to… wash your hands. The soap and friction together wash the germs down the drain. Hand-washing tips:

  • Use regular soap, not antibacterial soap. Antibacterial soap can help create antibiotic-resistant germs.
  • After soaping your hands, sing a song like Happy Birthday (twice) or Twinkle Twinkle, Little Star while you rub your hands together. (Dancing in place and harmonizing with the person at the neighbouring sink: optional!) Both songs give you the ideal scrub time of about 20 seconds.
  • Make sure to wash the back of your hands and in between your fingers.
  • Rinse well and gently pat your hands dry.
  • To stop your hands from drying out, use lotions as needed.

The second way to keep your hands clean is to use hand sanitizer. Things to consider:

  • The sanitizer should be made up of at least 60% alcohol.
  • It’s convenient to use and you can keep it in your car or purse.
  • Use enough to keep your hands “wet” for 20 seconds. Rub your hands until it evaporates.
  • If your hands are visibly dirty, don’t use hand sanitizer. Instead, wash your hands. If this isn’t an option, use a wipe or towelette to get rid of dirt, then use hand sanitizer.

When should you clean your hands?

  • Before and after eating.
  • Before and after feeding someone else.
  • Before preparing food and after handling raw meat.
  • Before and after caring for someone who’s sick or injured.
  • Before inserting and removing contact lenses.
  • Before flossing your teeth.
  • After using the washroom or helping someone use the washroom.
  • After sneezing, coughing or using a tissue.
  • After handling pets or animal waste.
  • After cleaning.
  • After handling garbage.

80% of common infections, including the flu, are spread by our hands. Keep others safe, and keep yourself safe – clean your hands!

Tamara Reichert

About Tamara Reichert

Tamara is the communications advisor for the innovation and development commons at Northern Health where she works on a number of projects with the research, quality improvement, clinical simulation, and education teams. Born and raised in Prince George, Tamara grew up on a ranch where she rode horses, played with farm animals, built forts, and raided the family garden. She enjoys spending time travelling, hiking, cooking, reading, and cheering for her favourite sports teams.

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The most ~wonderful/stressful/jam-packed/crazy~ time of the year.

Tinsel, lights, snowmen, dinner, dishes, regular family, extra family, cold weather, sick kids, no school, tree, decorating, stockings, baking, thinking of presents, buying presents, wrapping presents…

“Holy S…anta Claus. Mom, how do you do this every year?”

I may have prefaced Santa with a few other adjectives when my mom, who I think I should start calling Saint Diana, began to list some of the challenges the holiday season typically brings for her. My poor mom. After hearing that, I couldn’t help but feel bad. This pressure to create the perfect occasion for so many people – no one person should have to bear that weight, whether it’s your mom, dad, you, or anyone!

Is it the most wonderful time of the year? It can be! But with the expectation and anticipation of a magical holiday comes a whole lot of work and stress. We have to remember that one of the big goals for this time of year should be to enjoy the company of family and friends.

This holiday season, let’s make sure we’re all doing our part to create a less stressed experience for all. Here are a couple easy ways to balance the cheer.

Family members at a pier on the ocean.

Plan ahead. If you’re hosting, keep it simple. Try menus you can make ahead of time or at least partially prepare and freeze. Decorate, cook, shop, or do whatever’s on your list in advance (yes, I know, easier said than done). If you’re visiting (or supporting your guests) and drinking alcohol, consider a plan for getting home safely at the end of the festivities – many communities offer special holiday transportation services and/or free ride programs like Operation Red Nose in Prince George.

Organize and delegate. Rather than one person cooking the whole family meal, invite guests to bring a dish.Kids can help with gift-wrapping, decorating, and baking. If you see one person rushing to do everything, that’s an opportunity to lend a hand.

Practice mindful eating and drinking. It’s no secret that the holidays expose us to an abundance of delicious food and drinks. Eating‘one more cookie’ or sipping on ‘one more drink’ are normal parts of holidaying, but be mindful of how your body is feeling. You can help maintain your regular sense of well-being by eating regular meals and snacks and engaging in fun physical activity. It’s a great time of year to combine indoor treats with outdoor experiences like snowman-building or skating!  

Stay within budget. Finances are a huge source of stress for many people. Do yourself a favour: set a budget and stay within it. It’s the time you spend, not the money, that really matters.

Remember what the holiday season is about for you. Make this your priority. Whether it’s the holiday advertising that creates a picture that the holidays are about shiny new toys, always-happy families, and gift giving, remember that this season is really about sharing, loving, and time spent with family and loved ones. No two families are alike, so develop your own inexpensive but meaningful family traditions. Also, remember not to take things too seriously. Find fun or silly things to do, play games, catch up on your favourite Netflix show, play with pets, spend time alone or with friends – all of these are good ways to reduce stress.

Connect with your community. Attend diverse cultural events with family and friends. Help out at a local food bank or another community organization. This is a time of year where you can truly leave a positive impact.

Soon, I’ll be flying out to see my family for the holidays.I know as soon as I get off the flight, Mom is going to be there, and she’ll want to make this another trip for the books. I’m sure it’s going to be the case, but because my sister and I are going to pitch in and help make it happen! I encourage everyone to do the same for the Saint Diana in their family.

Happy Holidays!

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Food Security, Part 3: A call to action

All British Columbians have the right to access a healthy diet in ways that are right for them. In two previous blog posts, I highlighted  household food insecurity and the Food Costing in BC report. With the knowledge that 17% of households in Northern BC are food insecure, what are our next steps?

It is important to mention that decreasing household food insecurity isn’t about decreasing the cost of food. This is because we also must ensure that our food system is healthy and sustainable. Part of a just food system is making sure growers and producers are paid a fair wage – which is reflected in the cost of food.

Community food security

There is a lot of wonderful food systems work happening in Northern communities that focuses on food growing, preparation, and eating. This focus on improving the food system works to increase community food security, which is the ability to access a healthy, safe, and culturally appropriate diet, while maintaining a sustainable, healthy, and just food system. Community food security programs can:

Household Food Insecurity: An income-based issue

However, while community food programs offer a lot of value, household food insecurity is an income-based issue that needs income-based solutions. The root cause of household food insecurity isn’t the price of food or distance to grocery stores. It’s also not lack of food skills or education; it’s that some households do not have enough income to purchase food. Community food programs do not address income deficits directly. According to local community advocate Stacey Tyers,

Food programs that focus on local and sustainable agriculture, (e.g. community gardens) are very important for the health and wellbeing of a community. However, without also addressing income, many community members still cannot afford to put food on the table.”

Changing the situation for those who struggle to meet their basic needs must begin with a focus on income. Exploring income based solutions is the most effective way to decrease household food insecurity:

Ultimately, no person should have to worry about getting enough food. BC would benefit from income based solutions that raise the income of fixed wage and low income earners, so that all British Columbians can have their basic needs met. Without addressing income, household food insecurity will remain a concern in our communities,” says Stacey.

Income based policy has been shown to work:

  • The risk of household food insecurity drops by 50% once low income adults reach the age of 65 and become eligible for seniors’ pension programs (a form of guaranteed income)
  • Newfoundland and Labrador invested in poverty reduction work, which saw a reduction in household food insecurity among social assistance recipients

Access to food is a human right – all Northerners should have their basic needs met. The health impacts of food insecurity go far beyond individual and household food patterns, or food and lifestyle “choices”. Household food insecurity is closely linked to income, and factors such as low income and unpredictable employment more deeply impact health than food choice itself.

Individuals, communities, and governments all have a role to play in making BC more food secure.

Wondering how you can get involved?

Check out the first two blogs of this series:

Laurel Burton

About Laurel Burton

Laurel works with Northern Health as a population health dietitian, with a focus on food security. She is a big proponent of taking a multi-dimensional approach to health and she is interested in the social determinants of health and how they affect overall well-being, both at the individual and population level. Laurel is a recent graduate of the UBC dietetics program, where she completed her internship with Northern Health. She has experience working with groups across the lifecycle within BC and internationally to support evidence-informed nutrition practice for the aim of optimizing health. When she is not working, Laurel enjoys cooking, hiking and travelling. She is looking forward to exploring more of the North!

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In Photos: Medical students meet “Simbaby”

Three medical students taking a simulated learning session with a baby simulator.Medical residents are shown taking a simulated learning session on how to help a baby breathe and make its heart beat. Respiratory Therapist Nicole Hamel led the training with them at the University Hospital of Northern BC in Prince George. The three are (L-R): Dr. Manpreet Sidhu, Dr. Jess Valleau, and Dr. Christine Kennedy. They’re using a realistic mannequin called a simulator to represent a newborn baby.

Tamara Reichert

About Tamara Reichert

Tamara is the communications advisor for the innovation and development commons at Northern Health where she works on a number of projects with the research, quality improvement, clinical simulation, and education teams. Born and raised in Prince George, Tamara grew up on a ranch where she rode horses, played with farm animals, built forts, and raided the family garden. She enjoys spending time travelling, hiking, cooking, reading, and cheering for her favourite sports teams.

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School Safety: The old and the new

Special Constable Fred Greene gives the facts about school safety in today’s world.

As I walked into the Prince George RCMP detachment to discuss school safety with Special Constable Fred Greene, I thought back to my school years. Was I safe back then? I think so. I knew to look both ways before I crossed the road, drugs and cigs were bad, and planning a safe ride home was a good thing. Pretty simple, right?

Well, to fall on that old cliché: “Times have changed.”

fred greene at a desk.It seems that each new generation of students has to deal with both the safety concerns of old (like crossing the road safely), and new safety hurdles that previous groups didn’t have to deal with. Technology has changed, social norms have changed, heck – even the climate has changed! Luckily, one thing hasn’t changed: the importance of teaching students about school safety and what they can do to be proactive.

That was why it was so great to sit down with S/Cst. Greene, an RCMP Community Safety Officer with more than 10 years’ experience. As someone who has presented hundreds of personal safety talks to student bodies ranging from elementary schools to universities, he was able to break down the big topics with me.

Here’s the big four, and what he had to say about each:

Pedestrian Safety

“Make eye contact and hand gestures with drivers before crossing street.”

Remember:

  • Use marked and signalled crosswalks, not shortcuts.
  • Wear light or reflective clothing at night.
  • Use sidewalks when provided, and walk facing the traffic if they’re unavailable.

drugs being exchangedDrug Awareness

“Plan ahead. As you make plans for the party or going out with friends, you need to plan ahead. You need to protect yourself and be smart. Don’t become a victim of someone else’s drug use. Make sure there’s someone you can call day or night, no matter what, if you need them. And, do the same for your friends.”

Remember:

  • First time use of street drugs can be fatal.
  • Usage and eventual addiction of prescription meds can be an easy way to get hooked on hard street drugs.
  • Consider that fentanyl may be found in street or non-prescribed medication.
  • Be cognizant that date rape drugs are easily attainable and can be found locally. They’re colourless, odourless, and easily placed in any drink.

Cyberbullying

“No information is truly private in the online world; an online ‘friend’ can forward any information posted on your site in a moment. Every text, conversation, photo, or phone call once sent will be permanent, public and searchable. If you delete a post, it can always be found.”

Remember:

  • Cyberbullying can be investigated under the Criminal Code as stalking, harassment, or threats.
  • If you receive bullying messages, don’t respond. Print them off and tell someone.
  • Anyone can pretend to be anyone, or anything, they want online.
  • Any inappropriate photos of someone under 18 years old on a device is considered child pornography.
  • Watch out for classified ads and inquiries from out of town or country. Be cautious of anyone asking for payment by Western Union or Crypto-currency.

Street Safety

“Stranger Danger. Don’t go with, take anything, or talk to a stranger. An adult never needs help from a child.”

Remember:

  • You are always safer in a group.
  • Use the buddy system when walking, attending events, or simply to talk to if you’re having a bad day.
  • Stay in well-lit areas at night and don’t use isolated trails.
  • Know your location at all times in case you need to reach someone or call 9-1-1.
  • Never meet a person from social media for the first time by yourself; meet in a public place with a friend or parent.

Interested in more safety tips? Visit these resources!

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The 1970s world of Dietetics: reflections of then and now

They say a picture says a thousand words but they can also offer a peek into another world. In this case: the 1970s world of Dietetics.

When I first saw the picture, a handful of questions came to mind. What were the uniforms for? Why did the women in the photo look so triumphant? I spoke with the owner of the photo, Linda McMynn, a Registered Dietitian with Northern Health, to find out.

Dietetic graduating class photo.

The 1970 Vancouver General Hospital Graduating class of Dietetic Interns. Linda McMynn stands in the back row, second from the right.

Tell me a little bit about this photo.

This is the 1970 Vancouver General Hospital graduating class of Dietetic Interns. Our undergrad caps had a pink stripe (all white when we graduated) and were folded a specific way that was supposed to identify us as dietitians and not nurses.

We were the first class allowed to wear poly/cotton uniforms but they HAD to be at least 3/4 length “to indicate dietitians are not cooks or dishwashers.” The instructors (in the middle) wore the standard cotton starched uniforms at all times.

We, as a class, were tired of being mistaken for nurses so we rebelled and submitted a written request at a meeting to wear lab coats over street clothes (unheard of and the instructors were shocked, I think, and didn’t know what to do with us). Anyhow, within the next few years, the interns were allowed to wear the lab coats or the uniforms and the caps were gone.

What was required to be a dietitian back then?

You had to have your Bachelor of Science in Nutrition (you still need this today). There were two streams back then: the dietetic program and the teaching program. Quite a few of the interns went on to become Home Economic teachers. You had to do three years of chemistry and an internship. Dietetic internships are still done today. Back then, they used to be done through the hospitals. I was always planning on becoming a nurse. After the first year I decided to transfer into the Dietetic program.

What was interning like?

We got paid a small amount for doing the internship but most of our time was spent doing full shifts in the various areas working under the direction of a Registered Dietitian (RD), except every other weekend when we had to work on our own, taking responsibility for the unit.

Wednesdays were classroom days when we had lectures, homework to do, and regular exams. We graduated pretty knowledgeable about therapeutic diets, including diets for most of the metabolic diseases that were known at the time.

Tell me about your career as a dietitian

My first job was at St. Paul’s Hospital. Eventually I moved up to Terrace where I was the first dietitian. My closest dietitian colleague was in Prince George. In those days, we couldn’t use long distance phone calls. It was isolating at times but the benefit of being in a small community, and having to do everything, is that you become a generalist. I learned a lot and discovered I liked administrative and operational work. Being in Terrace worked out well for me. In 2014, I officially retired. Now I report on and work on various projects. In 2015 and 2016, I went to Fort St. John to spend time there to help. There were a lot of interesting projects and I worked on from home.

Lady sitting in chair.

In 2014, Linda (pictured here) officially “retired”. She now reports on and works on various projects.

How has the profession changed?

Back then there was a hierarchy, whereas now, it’s interdisciplinary and you work as part of a team. It was a very different world, very rigid. We would take orders from nurses or doctors and didn’t really ever get to prescribe a diet. Now doctors and nurses will leave it up to dietitians to prescribe diets which is pretty exciting. It’s taken a lot of years to get here. Working together now, we’ve made huge strides.

Haylee Seiter

About Haylee Seiter

A Northerner since childhood, Haylee has grown up in Prince George and recently completed her Bachelor of Commerce at the University of Northern British Columbia. During university Haylee found her passion for health promotion while volunteering heavily with the Canadian Cancer Society and was also involved with the UNBC JDC West team, bringing home gold as part of the Marketing team in 2016. Joining the communications team as an advisor for population and public health has been a dream come true for her. When she is not dreaming up marketing and communications strategies, she can be found cycling with the Wheelin Warriors or enjoying a glass of wine with friends.
(NH Blog Admin)

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Healthy School Fundraisers: A win-win for schools and families!

With the new school year beginning, back-to-school fundraising season will soon be underway. Whether it’s to purchase new equipment or pay for a trip, fundraisers are a reality of school life.

How do you feel about school fundraisers? Based on my conversations with parents and teachers, responses run the gamut from enthusiasm and pride to disapproval and dread. While fundraisers can be a great way to enrich students’ learning experiences, there are also some concerns. Many fundraisers rely on the sales of highly processed, less nutritious foods such as chocolate bars and cookies. This sends confusing messages to kids and is at odds with many individuals’ and schools’ goals around healthy eating.

So how do we fundraise for our schools while honouring our commitment to creating healthy school environments? Fundraisers can be a great opportunity to promote healthy eating while raising money at the same time! Many BC schools have found that healthy food and non-food fundraisers can be just as (if not more) profitable.

students sorting produce

The Fresh to You Fundraiser is offered by the BC School Fruit and Vegetable Program. Students sell bundles of seasonal local produce and make a guaranteed 40% profit. Win-win!

Here are a few creative fundraising ideas that have worked well in other schools:

  • Healthier bake sales
  • School-made cookbooks or calendars
  • Art walks featuring student or other local artwork
  • Healthy community dinners
  • Seedling sales – try growing them in your own classroom!
  • Christmas family portraits

Here’s another great idea: students selling bundles of seasonal and local fruits and vegetables to friends and family, while making a guaranteed 40% profit. I’m talking about the Fresh to You Fundraiser offered by the BC School Fruit and Vegetable Program! Last year I bought a bundle from a friend’s daughter who was doing the fundraiser in Terrace. I got a variety of local produce, all while supporting students and BC farmers. It’s a win-win!

Does this sound like something your school might be interested in trying? For more information, as well as recipes featuring products from the bundles, visit the Fresh to You Fundraiser website. Online applications for this year’s Fresh to You Fundraiser will be accepted until September 22, 2018.

Show your commitment to creating healthy school spaces by being the next school fundraiser champion! For healthier fundraiser ideas, tips and recipes, consider checking out the following resources:

Has your school planned a healthy school fundraiser? How did it go? Get others inspired and share your success stories in the comments below.

 

Emilia Moulechkova

About Emilia Moulechkova

Originally from the Lower Mainland, Emilia started her career with Northern Health as a dietetic intern in 2013. Since then, she has worked in a variety of roles as a Registered Dietitian with the population health team. In her current role, she supports schools across the north in their efforts to promote healthy eating. Emilia is passionate about food’s role in bringing people and communities together, and all the ways it can support physical, mental, and social health. Her overall philosophy on healthy eating can be summarized by this Ellyn Satter quote: “When the joy goes out of eating, nutrition suffers.” In her spare time, she loves exploring the beautiful northern outdoors by foot, skis, bike, or canoe!

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