Healthy Living in the North

Coffee Break: Taking 5 for Alzheimer’s disease

Finally, a worthwhile reason to drink coffee!

Alzheimer’s disease. It’s a pretty scary topic for most of us, yet it’s also a very real part of life for so many of us. It’s estimated that 70,000 British Columbians are affected by dementia, and this number is growing (Alzheimer Society BC). Unfortunately, Alzheimer’s and other dementias are also quite commonly misunderstood. For instance, what is the difference between Alzheimer’s and dementia? If I misplace my keys on a regular basis, does that mean I have Alzheimer’s? There are too many myths and realities about the disease to list in one small story.

My grandpa, forever a farmer, never lost his love for animals.

For me personally, it’s a topic that is very near and dear to my heart, having spent several years working with people living with dementia, as well as having lived the experience as my Grandpa lived and eventually passed away with the disease. I knew him as my boisterous & jolly “Papa Bear,” and even as he deteriorated, we still saw glimpses of his old self shining through. Put a mouth organ in his hands, he would soon be treating you to a foot-tapping tune; place his favourite foods in front of him (of which there were many!), and he was in his glory!

I learned a few very important things from my time spent with people living with Alzheimer’s and other dementias:

  • No matter how buried or hidden, your loved one is still there.
  • Live in the moment! If it’s a good moment, grab it and enjoy it for all it’s worth! If it’s a bad moment, do your best to take care of your loved one and yourself and wait for better moments to come (they will!).
  • Try not to focus on what the person can’t do, but rather capitalize on what they are still able to do and enjoy in order to preserve and promote quality of life.
  • Living a healthy lifestyle, like keeping your brain and body active, sleeping and eating well, and maintaining social connections can help prevent, delay the onset, or slow the progression of the disease. (Watch this great video: What you can do to prevent Alzheimer’s.)

You might be wondering, “What does this all have to do with drinking coffee?” I’m glad you asked! What if I told you that you could help raise awareness and funds to support Alzheimer’s related services and programs over your next cup of coffee? Coffee Break® is a national annual fundraiser where friends, families and co-workers gather in communities to raise money for their local Alzheimer Society. Hosts and attendees make their coffee count by exchanging donations for a cup of coffee, tea, or other treat. It’s very easy to join or host a coffee break, and you can do it anywhere and anytime during the months of September and October! If you can’t host a coffee break this year, you can still help out by texting the word “COFFEE” to 45678 to donate $5 to the Alzheimer Society of B.C. How simple is that? Doesn’t it feel good to do something for a great cause? My “Papa Bear” and I thank you!

Gloria Fox

About Gloria Fox

Gloria Fox is the Regional Physical Activity Lead for Northern Health’s Population Health team. She is a graduate of the University of Alberta’s faculty of PE & Recreation, and until beginning this role has spent most of her career working as a Recreation Therapist with NH. She has a passion for helping others pursue an optimal leisure lifestyle and quality of life at all stages of their lives. In order to maintain her own health (and sanity), Gloria enjoys many outdoor activities, including hiking, camping, canoeing, and cycling, to name a few. She is a self-proclaimed foodie and her life’s ambition is to see as much of the world as possible.

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What is MILK? It’s time to protect, promote, and support maternal & child health!

(Note: co-authored by Sarah Gray, Primary Care Nurse)

As a Lactation Consultant with Northern Health and a new mother, I am deeply passionate about maternal and child health. It’s an honour to support families along their desired feeding journey. I strive to provide evidence-based information that empowers women and their families to make the best decisions. In my work, I keep my personal birthing and feeding journey close to mind. I find it important to connect with families as a fellow parent, as this provides another level of support.

Through an intimate and artistic lens, MILK brings a universal perspective on the politics, commercialization, and controversies surrounding birth and infant feeding over the canvas of stunningly beautiful visuals and poignant voices from around the globe.” (www.milkhood.com, 2017)

The communities of Prince George and Smithers are hosting an exciting opportunity to broaden the exposure of birthing and infant feeding on a global level. I encourage the public to take advantage of the free screenings of MILK: Born into this World. Following the screening, there will be a panel discussion with key community stakeholders to highlight the challenges and opportunities that exist within our communities.

Prince George Screening
Location: Prince George Public Library (Bob Harkins Branch)
Address: 888 Canada Games Way, Prince George, BC V2L 5T6
Date: Thursday, September 21st, 2017
Time: 10:00 am to 1:00 pm
Registration: Drop-in. Limited seating (maximum 100 people)
Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/836744646495537

Smithers Screening
Location: Smithers Public Library
Address: 3817 Alfred Avenue, Smithers, BC V0J 2N0
Date: Thursday, September 21st, 2017
Time: 9:00 am to 12:00 pm
Registration: Drop-in. Limited seating (maximum 50 people)
Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/1401529189924722

This documentary has caught the eye of leaders around the world; our own Mm. Sophie Gregoire Trudeau shares her passion for the MILK documentary and the education it provides. This documentary is not focused solely on the personal stories of mothers; rather it highlights the important roles within the community to support each birthing and feeding journey.

Reflect on your personal experiences of birthing and infant feeding. What challenges come to mind, and how can we come together as a community to provide support to families? With the World Health Organization (WHO) recommendations on breastfeeding, as a community, we need to continue to promote the normalcy and importance of breastfeeding.

It’s time to get involved! Attend a screening of MILK and follow MILK on social media!

Facebook: facebook.com/MilkTheFilm
Twitter: @MilkTheFilm
Instagram: @MilkTheFilm

Brittney McCullough

About Brittney McCullough

Brittney, born and raised in Prince George, graduated as a registered nurse in 2012 from UNBC. She completed her Perinatal Specialty Certificate in 2013, and IBCLC in 2017, and maternal and child health has always been her passion. She has recently taken a new role as a Lactation Consultant for Northern Health. She enjoys the northern outdoors and all that it offers, especially spending weekends at the cabin. With her first child born in 2016, her daily life is all about making memories with family and friends.

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It takes a community: September 9th is FASD awareness day

This blog was co-authored by Amy Da Costa (Regional Nursing Lead, Injury Prevention) and Stacie Weich (Regional Program Lead, Mental Wellness and Prevention of Substance Harms)


Communities have the opportunity and power to contribute to FASD prevention.

Fall is a time of transition and reflection. September and October in particular offer opportunities to reflect on healthy beginnings, with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) awareness day taking place today on September 9th and Breastfeeding Week coming up in early October. In a recent blog post, I encouraged readers to think about what they could do to grow breastfeeding-friendly communities. Similarly, we all have a role to play in supporting healthy pregnancies.

Years ago, I worked with a group to organize a “community baby shower” for FASD awareness day. The group decided on the slogan, “Support our ladies, protect our babies: alcohol-free pregnancy”. Their words emphasize that individuals, families, and communities all have the opportunity and power to contribute to FASD prevention and to support healthy pregnancies more generally.

Health occurs in communities, in the contexts in which people find themselves. How can these contexts become even more supportive of health? What can communities do to help to prevent FASD? I asked a few of my colleagues in Population Health to share their thoughts on this matter:

  • Let’s build understanding, address myths, and provide clear information:

“FASD crosses all cultural, ethnic, socio-economic, and educational boundaries.”

“50% of pregnancies are unplanned. Women may use alcohol before they know they are pregnant.”

“In any community where there is pregnancy and where there is alcohol consumption, there is a risk of FASD.”

  • Let’s create safe spaces and strong support networks:

“How can our neighbourhood host welcoming spaces and social events where alcohol and other substances are not present?”

“How can our community foster social groups for expectant mothers?

“How can we remove barriers for community members to access food, shelter, and supports for mental and emotional health?”

  • Let’s talk … and listen:

“Let’s assume that all women are doing the best they can today to care for themselves and their growing babies. By setting the stage for open, honest, and judgement-free conversations, we can truly understand what women need from us as partners, friends, communities, and health workers.”

“How can we choose language that supports wellness and decreases stigma around FASD? For examples, see Language Guide: Promoting dignity for those impacted by FASD.”

“How do we open the door to important conversations?”

There’s certainly a lot to think about here! Even a small change can have a big impact. What is one step that our community could take to help prevent FASD?

Learn more about FASD:

More from Northern Health:

Lise Luppens

About Lise Luppens

Lise started her career as a dietitian with Northern Health in 2004 when she moved to Terrace "for a year." More than 10 years later, she is now part of the regional population health registered dietitian team and she continues to love living, working and playing in B.C.'s northwest. Lise enjoys playing outside with her husband and friends and you might find her skiing, biking or kiting. She’s passionate about local food, keeps a garden, enjoys local community-supported agriculture (CSA) and farmers market goodies, and carries out food preservation projects.

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Overdose Prevention: Northern BC’s Naloxone Champions

Thursday, August 31 marks International Overdose Awareness Day (IOAD), a day that aims to raise awareness of overdose and reduce the stigma of drug-related death. Since the recent rise in overdose deaths, Northern Health staff and physicians, as well as community partners, have responded quickly in providing take home naloxone training and naloxone kits to people at risk of overdose as well as their friends and family members.

In 2017 alone, records show 105 naloxone kits refilled in northern B.C. – that’s 105 kits used and 105 lives saved thanks to training and dispensing taking place in our region!

Over the course of the last year, staff at the 41 take home naloxone sites across northern B.C. have had diverse experiences and developed unique strategies to get naloxone kits into the hands of those who need them. We want to share one of these experiences now, from the Intensive Case Management Team in the northwest.

team van, naloxone

Part of the NW Intensive Case Management Team

In what ways do you work with community members?
First and foremost, our team is non-judgmental and comes from a place of caring and support for individuals experiencing difficulties with substance use, regardless of their history. We work at street level with many clients, building rapport over time, providing wellness checks, harm reduction supplies, and supporting clients with access to various services. Our team also attends shelters, clients’ homes, and conducts meetings within the office as well, based on what the community member is comfortable with. For some community members, it takes time for trust to form to ask for services, including take home naloxone or harm reduction supplies.

What’s the message to your audience?
We try to convey that our intentions come from a place of caring and that we hope to help keep them healthy and safe, not to judge or push for a change that they may not want or be ready for. We’re humble and recognize the immense value of lived experience in the work we do.

Our team tries to be flexible and take the direction from the individual we’re working with and support them in their journey, whatever journey that may be. We help empower them to access resources based on their own choices to reduce harms, and our team truly believes in the work they’re doing and the people they engage with.

How do you train people to use naloxone and/or when dispensing kits?
It really depends on the audience, but we maintain that we’re adaptable and that the client can take the lead. This means to be effective, sometimes our strategies toward naloxone training have to be pretty fluid.

Recreating life-like scenarios dealing with overdose, similar to if you were learning CPR training, has been an effective way of teaching individuals the steps to how to handle an overdose scenario. Diving into the realities of what people may see if they witness or come across someone who has overdosed can be unsettling, so we make sure to create a safe space for individuals to ask questions and practice drawing up and injecting the medication. Take home naloxone is comparable to having a first aid kit, and our team respects a person’s privacy around their use of it or the use of it on someone close to them.

Our most important training assets, of course, are our amazing peers who champion take home naloxone. They hand out their cards, nurture relationships with the at-risk population, and let them know where they can get naloxone, training, and other resources. They work within the community and seize any opportunity to offer naloxone training and kits!

naloxone kit overdose

Naloxone kits are easy to carry, and include application instructions.

Can you tell us about the experience you’ve had when developing community partnerships to dispense naloxone?
The support we’ve received from community partnerships has been awesome. We started building relationships within the community by going out and introducing our team, and then created a space for collaborative dialogue amongst Northern Health partners and other community agencies. Our team provides support to community agencies if they are wanting assistance navigating naloxone information and access to take home naloxone kits. In turn, the community service providers are able to alert us when a person is ready and willing to receive services.

We’re very thankful our partners have been open to welcoming us into their space to work alongside them in service provision, as this is where the clients are and feel most comfortable. Partnering with various agencies and various emergency responders has helped us better connect with individuals that may be at risk of overdose, which has proved to be invaluable when it comes to helping people in a timely manner.

Where can naloxone and other resources be found?
Naloxone kits are available to be dispensed for free to community members at risk for overdose and their friends and family members. The more naloxone kits we can get out into the community, the better equipped our community members are to respond to an overdose and save a life!

Harm Reduction Sites supply naloxone and other health and wellness resources – get to know the one in your community! Northern Health also has an Overdose Prevention page on their website that has lots of great overdose information, including how to recognize overdose and the SAVEME steps to help in an overdose situation.

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Wildfire smoke: many tobacco users finding it hard to breathe!

fire fighter walking by forrest fire

Tobacco users may find that wildfire smoke is causing severe symptoms such as shortness of breath, persistent coughing, wheezing, chest tightness and increased mucous production.

I spoke with a friend who smokes cigarettes earlier this week and she said that she wasn’t able to leave the house over the weekend due to the forest fire smoke in the air.

Wildfire smoke is a mixture of particles and gas containing hundreds of chemicals, and tobacco users may find that wildfire smoke is causing severe symptoms such as shortness of breath, persistent coughing, wheezing, chest tightness and increased mucous production.

Is it a preview of what lies ahead?

If you smoke cigarettes or cigars, the toxins in tobacco smoke may be already causing severe lung irritation and the onset of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Symptoms of COPD occur when the lungs and airways lose their elasticity, the walls between air sacs are destroyed, the airways thicken and become swollen and more mucous is produced.

During times of poor air quality such as wild fire smoke, some smokers find it very hard to breathe because they already have lung disease. They may not be aware that they have COPD. Although the fires will soon be extinguished, the progression of COPD continues if tobacco users don’t quit.

In the years ahead, smokers may experience shortness of breath, persistent coughing, wheezing, chest tightness and increased mucous production every day, even when the air quality is good.

The discomfort that my friend has been experiencing is helping her make a quit plan. She doesn’t want to feel like that again!

If you are concerned about your health or the health of others, there are resources to help quit using tobacco.

For help quitting smoking visit quitnow.ca or call 1-877-455-2233.

Access information and FREE nicotine patches, gum, lozenges or inhalers through the BC Smoking Cessation Program. Visit your pharmacy to access these products. You may be eligible for assistance to purchase smoking cessation medications.

Nancy Viney

About Nancy Viney

Nancy is a registered nurse working in Northern Health’s population health team. She often imagines a day when no one in northern British Columbia suffers from the harmful effects of tobacco. In her time off, she enjoys spending time with her family and friends, especially her two little grandchildren! Nancy also enjoys quilting, knitting, crocheting and many other home spun crafts.

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Teeth matter

This summer, we want to know what wellness means to you! Share a  photo, story, drawing, or video explaining what wellness means to you for a chance to win a grand prize! To inspire you, we’ve featured regular wellness content on the Northern Health Matters blog all summer long!


Spirit the caribou in front of baby teeth poster

Baby teeth are important for jaw development, chewing, speech development, and spacing. Mouth care for kids starts sooner than you may realize!

What would we do without our teeth?

Strong, healthy teeth are a vital part of our overall health and daily living. They are a unique part of our bodies. They come in all shapes, colours, and sizes, and help us with jaw development, to chew, to speak, and even to smile.

Yes, teeth matter!

Caring for your teeth is very important and needs to be done every day.  As a community dental hygienist with Northern Health, my role is to help educate parents and children in keeping their teeth healthy for a lifetime.

Here are some simple oral health tips I share often:

  • Help your children brush twice daily with a fluoride toothpaste.
  • Lift your child’s lip one time a month and check for new teeth or signs of decay.
  • Bring your child to your family dentist when they are around one year old.
  • Offer water instead of sugar drinks when they’re thirsty.
  • Offer a variety of healthy foods and limit sugary snacks.
Spirit mascot in front of poster

You can keep your child’s teeth healthy by brushing them in the morning and before bed, starting as soon as those teeth erupt. Use a little smear of toothpaste that has fluoride in it.

Teeth really do matter. I have seen the devastating effects that tooth decay can have on our health. Decay can cause loss of appetite and loss of sleep, ultimately leading to delays in growth, learning and development. It can affect our desire to smile and to socialize. If tooth decay is left to abscess, serious health issues may develop and may require antibiotics and other medications,-even hospitalization. Loss of schooling and /or work may occur.

At Northern Health, we provide free dental screenings and fluoride varnish treatments to children six years and under. We can also help connect you with a family dentist.

The good news is tooth decay is preventable and with proper daily oral hygiene and a limited sugary diet, your smile can last you a lifetime.

For more information on how to protect your oral health check out the following resources:

Carmen Gottschling-Aceto

About Carmen Gottschling-Aceto

Carmen is a Community Dental Hygienist living and working in beautiful Prince Rupert. She joined the Northern Health dental team part-time in 2012 and continues to work part-time in private practice. She loves working with families and educating them on good oral health practices. Born and raised on the north coast, she has an ultimate passion for fishing and hunting which she shares with her husband. They are raising three active teenage children. As a family they enjoy attending and coaching the kids various activities, camping and just spending quality time together.

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Growing breastfeeding-friendly communities: you can help!

breastfeeding mom on picnic bench

Nursing mothers have the right to breastfeed their children in a public area.

As a breastfeeding mother, I have received support from friends, family, health professionals, and community members. This was true in the early days, as my baby and I were getting the hang of breastfeeding, and it is still true today as I continue to nurse my toddler. While I have generally felt supported, I also know that mothers can face challenges when breastfeeding.

Promoting, protecting, and supporting breastfeeding is a responsibility shared by families, communities, health regions and policy makers. This means supporting individual mothers, as well as growing breastfeeding-friendly communities.

breastfeeding mom in barber shop

Is your business breastfeeding friendly?

A challenge a woman should not have to face is a lack of knowledge about her right to breastfeed. Did you know that women’s right to breastfeed is protected by law in British Columbia? As per B.C.’s Ministry of Justice:

  • Nursing mothers have the right to breastfeed their children in a public area
  • It is discriminatory to ask a mother to cover up or breastfeed somewhere else

Women’s right to breastfeed is not new, but it may not be common knowledge. A little education and respectful conversation can go a long way.

Are you wondering what you or your business can do to make northern communities breastfeeding friendly and safe?

Consider ordering a free breastfeeding decal from Northern Health! The “Growing for Gold” decal can be placed on a glass door or window to show a welcoming attitude and support for breastfeeding moms and babies. The decal also comes with helpful information that you can share with staff or clients/customers, including:

  • “All women have a right to breastfeed. Anytime. Anywhere.”
  • Tips for creating breastfeeding-friendly spaces
  • Responding to a family’s request for a more comfortable or private location
  • Managing customers who may express negative feelings towards public breastfeeding

    Growing for Gold Breastfeeding Friendly decal

    The Growing for Gold decal on your business window shares your support and welcome to breastfeeding moms and babies.

When you order a decal, your business/facility will be added to the list of Breastfeeding Friendly Places on the Growing for Gold website (join the recently signed up Telkwa General Store & Café and other northern B.C. businesses who have shown their support by requesting a decal!).

A decal is a small thing, but it sends an important message and supports a valuable conversation. Help us to grow breastfeeding-friendly communities across the north!

Lise Luppens

About Lise Luppens

Lise started her career as a dietitian with Northern Health in 2004 when she moved to Terrace "for a year." More than 10 years later, she is now part of the regional population health registered dietitian team and she continues to love living, working and playing in B.C.'s northwest. Lise enjoys playing outside with her husband and friends and you might find her skiing, biking or kiting. She’s passionate about local food, keeps a garden, enjoys local community-supported agriculture (CSA) and farmers market goodies, and carries out food preservation projects.

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Breathe easier during smoky skies

Smoky skies above the city

Protect yourself during smoky skies bulletins. Photo by Barb Oke.

The province is currently inundated with numerous wildfires. Not only are fires a serious safety risk, but the smoke from these fires can be harmful to our health (especially to unborn children, children, the elderly, and those with chronic illness).

Here are some quick tips for breathing easier during a smoky skies bulletin:

  • Limit your exposure to wildfire smoke
    • Stay indoors and keep the air clean (windows/doors closed, no smoking, no burning fireplaces/candles/incense, no vacuuming, use a HEPA or EP indoor air cleaner if available).
    • Reduce the amount of time spent outdoors – avoid rigorous outdoor activities.
    • When in a vehicle, keep windows closed with air conditioning set to recirculate.
  • Visit a clean air shelter or a location that has a large volume of air that is air conditioned and filters the air (such as shopping malls, swimming pools, public libraries, etc.).
  • People with asthma or other chronic illness should activate their asthma or personal care plans. Some people may consider leaving the smoke filled area altogether.
  • Visit HealthLinkBC, call 8-1-1 (non-emergency), see your doctor, or call 9-1-1 (emergency) if you’re experiencing symptoms, ranging from eye, nose, and throat irritation to difficulties breathing and cardiovascular distress.
  • Be aware – visit bcairquality.ca for current air quality information.

Smoky conditions often happen during hot weather events, which means that it may also be important to stay cool:

  • Spend time in the coolest room in the home (e.g. basement).
  • Use an air conditioner or spend time at a location equipped with air conditioning and air filtration.
  • Take a cool bath or shower.

For information regarding wildfires, including information on wildfire status and prevention, visit the BC Wildfire Service. Report wildfires to *5555 (cell) or 1-800-663-5555.

For road updates, please contact www.drivebc.ca

For evacuation updates, please connect with Emergency Info BC: www.emergencyinfobc.gov.bc.ca

Northern Health supports the Ministry of Environment (MoE) with air quality advisories and bulletins when certain air pollutants become a concern. MoE issues Smoky Skies Bulletins when smoke can be expected in a local airshed. Unlike air quality advisories which are based on air concentrations measured at monitors, these Smoky Skies Bulletins are issued by a meteorologist who uses a number of different tools to determine that smoke is likely to enter a specified region. These bulletins can provide sooner warning to people that their health may be affected during the smoke event and may also be in affect longer than a typical advisory due to the unpredictable nature of wildfire smoke.

Paula Tait

About Paula Tait

Paula works in Prince George as a Health and Resource Development Technical Advisor, working collaboratively to assess and minimize health impacts related to industrial development. Born and raised in Terrace, she completed her schooling in Edmonton, and started her environmental health career in southeast Saskatchewan in 2005. She has been back in northern B.C. since 2010. Paula enjoys being creative, listening to music, and spending time with family and friends.

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Crunching the numbers to protect our health

To shed some light on a topic that is so often out of view, occurring at the level of tiny particles, I spoke with air quality meteorologist Gail Roth. She took me through a day in the life of someone who spends a lot of time amidst tiny particles with big health impacts!

How do we measure air quality?

The Ministry of Environment has two types of monitors, continuous and non-continuous, that are set up in communities all over B.C. We monitor all sorts of pollutants, including sulphur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and more.

Because it’s the air pollutant that most often exceeds provincial objectives, a primary area of concern is particulate matter pollution – the tiniest of particles in the air that can get stuck deep in our lungs. These are called PM2.5 – particulate matter (PM) that is 2.5 micrometres or smaller in diameter. For comparison, a human hair is approximately 60 micrometres in diameter. PM2.5 is largely generated from combustion sources (e.g., vehicles, residential wood burnings, industrial processes).

We also monitor PM10 (particulate matter that is smaller than 10 micrometres). These larger particles are mostly caused by big particles like road dust, wood dust, or pollen being broken down.

In both cases, we measure how many of these particles there are in one cubic metre of air. You’ll see this reported as micrograms per metre cubed: µg/m³.

Fire crews assessing wildfire from a helicopter

Although specific smoke conditions might change because of wind, fire behaviour, and temperature, a smoky skies advisory in your area means you can expect higher levels of particulate matter pollution. Photo courtesy of BC Wildfire Service.

What is an air quality advisory?

The provincial objective for PM2.5 levels in a 24-hour period is 25 µg/m³. When a community gets above or close to this level, we issue an air quality advisory. This lets people know that their breathing may be affected and that they should be taking action to protect their health and reduce their emissions. The annual objective, which we use to monitor long term PM2.5 levels, is 8 µg/m³.

The provincial objective for PM10 levels in a 24-hour period is 50 µg/m³. When a community gets above or close to this level, we issue a dust advisory.

If there’s a forest fire in your area, you may also see a smoky skies advisory. Although specific smoke conditions might change because of wind, fire behaviour, and temperature, a smoky skies advisory in your area means you can expect higher levels of particulate matter pollution.

What actions can I take to protect myself during these advisories?

We include these actions right in the advisories, so they can be a helpful tool in protecting your health. The overarching goal of these actions is to reduce your exposure to the poor air. Some specific actions include:

  • Avoid roads with heavy traffic and areas with wood smoke
  • Reduce or stop physical activity if breathing becomes difficult

Further actions, including staying indoors and running air cleaners, may be needed for those who are more sensitive, like seniors, children, and people with underlying medical conditions.

What else do air quality meteorologists do?

In addition to monitoring air quality and issuing public reports and advisories, there are two other main parts to our work:

  1. Technical reviews: As an example, when an industry applies for a permit for a project that might have air pollution emissions, we review the application and evaluate its potential impact on air quality in the local community and surrounding area.
  2. Supporting local airshed management groups: We help to start these groups and translate technical air quality information for them. Local members drive the groups and we’re a resource for them, providing support on the science side.

Where can I learn about advisories in my community?

I’d encourage everyone to visit bcairquality.ca. Whenever an advisory is in place, it will appear as a link on the homepage. Even if there’s no advisory, you can still find current air quality conditions for where you live as well as great resources.


More information

Do you have respiratory sensitivities or want to take extra precautions during wildfire smoke events?

There is a growing body of evidence to suggest that portable air cleaners (equipped with HEPA filters or electrostatic precipitators) are effective at reducing indoor particulate matter concentrations and the associated health effects during short smoke events.

Be sure to research products before purchasing a portable air cleaner! Learn about the type of unit you’re purchasing and the proper sizing for your space. On these devices, you’ll notice a number called the clean air delivery rate (CADR) – if you’re concerned about wildfire smoke, the CADR rating for tobacco smoke is the most relevant to look at.

When using a portable air cleaner, limit the entry of outdoor air. Keep in mind when you’re indoors and using a portable air cleaner, however, that there can be risks from increased heat and indoor-generated air pollutants.


A version of this article was originally published in the summer 2017 issue of Healthier You magazine. Read the full issue – all about healthy lungs – on ISSUU!

Vince Terstappen

About Vince Terstappen

Vince Terstappen is a Project Assistant with the health promotions team at Northern Health. He has an undergraduate and graduate degree in the area of community health and is passionate about upstream population health issues. Born and raised in Calgary, Vince lived, studied, and worked in Saskatoon, Victoria, and Vancouver before moving to Vanderhoof in 2012. When not cooking or baking, he enjoys speedskating, gardening, playing soccer, attending local community events, and Skyping with his old community health classmates who are scattered across the world. Vince works with Northern Health program areas to share healthy living stories and tips through the blog and moderates all comments for the Northern Health Matters blog. (Vince no longer works with Northern Health, we wish him all the best.)

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Podcasters, meteorologists, physiotherapists, wildfire fighters, and more: The many faces of healthy lungs!

Magazine cover with physiotherapy student and pulmonary rehabilitation client.

Healthy lungs take centre stage in the latest issue of Healthier You magazine!

In reading through the latest issue of Healthier You, it becomes clear that respiratory health is a significant issue in northern B.C.

What is also clear, however, is just how many diverse programs, people, communities, and partners are coming together to better understand and take action on this issue. We can all play a role in promoting health, protecting healthy environments, and preventing lung disease!

Take a look through the latest issue of the magazine online or look for a hard copy of the magazine in local doctors’ offices, clinics, and Northern Health facilities near you! All past issues of Healthier You are also available online.

Here are just a few of the healthy lung stories you can read in Healthier You magazine:

Vince Terstappen

About Vince Terstappen

Vince Terstappen is a Project Assistant with the health promotions team at Northern Health. He has an undergraduate and graduate degree in the area of community health and is passionate about upstream population health issues. Born and raised in Calgary, Vince lived, studied, and worked in Saskatoon, Victoria, and Vancouver before moving to Vanderhoof in 2012. When not cooking or baking, he enjoys speedskating, gardening, playing soccer, attending local community events, and Skyping with his old community health classmates who are scattered across the world. Vince works with Northern Health program areas to share healthy living stories and tips through the blog and moderates all comments for the Northern Health Matters blog. (Vince no longer works with Northern Health, we wish him all the best.)

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