Healthy Living in the North

Success in Smithers: How cross-training and staff education has led to a fully staffed, skilled primary health care team

Members of the Smithers primary health care team are lined up, smiling, in their office.

Members of the Smithers primary health care team. L-R: Mike Oaks, Primary Care Nurse; Heather Olsen, Primary Care Assistant; Sandra Stanley, Team Lead; Stacey Pederson, Primary Care Assistant; Sam Bosscher, Primary Care Nurse.

Over the last couple of years, the primary health care team in Smithers has been struggling to get to a point where they have a complete number of staff. Today, we’re happy to say that all primary care nurse (PCN) positions are full!

What is a primary health care team and what’s the latest on the Smithers team?

A primary health care team is composed of nurses, social workers, physiotherapists and occupational therapists, dietitians, a diabetes educator, and other professionals who work together to support patients in the community.

Out of the 11 full-time and part-time staff who make up the PCNs on the Smithers primary health care team, only three team members have worked on the team for more than 18 months. That means that 72% of the team are new staff. Right now, there are two casual employees that are in permanent positions, and only one of them has been in Smithers longer than 18 months. The team has hired nine casual PCNs over the last 18 months and nearly all of them have become permanent employees or are in temporary positions.

PCNs and primary health care are pretty new… what’s happening with training?

I spoke with Sandra Stanley, Team Lead for the Smithers primary health care team, to find out how she’s cross training the new staff.

“The ‘how we did it’ is partially the people that are here. They’re amazing people – intelligent, kind, compassionate, and motivated to give great care,” says Sandra.

When Sandra started as the Team Lead, many skilled staff had left and new staff members were struggling. They needed support to provide the full range of expected services. Smithers faced many challenges getting to this point, but they now have a stable team and good morale.

“I believe now, from talking with nurses, that the morale has improved, and they have become a tight and supportive team that work really well together, and genuinely like each other,” says Sandra. “They’ve picked up the education with enthusiasm and [they’ve] been keen learners. They’re intelligent, compassionate, and good critical thinkers. I count myself as fortunate to be leading such a team and the credit for what I see as success is due in very large part to them and their excellent qualities.”

Sandra believes that, wherever possible, a key to training is modeling the skill for others. Along with “walking the talk,” here’s how the Smithers team is tackling training for different aspects of their roles:

Palliative care
Palliative care is a “way of being” with people. It requires nurses to have the ability to assess the state people are in emotionally and spiritually, as well as physically. It can’t all be taught in a classroom. The skills are learned through experience, and being with other nurses who can mentor those skills. It was important to Sandra to pair less experienced nurses with others who have strong palliative care skills. The team was fortunate to have a primary care nurse with strong palliative care skills come back and join the team after moving away to work elsewhere. This was a game changer in many respects and helped provide that knowledgeable, consistent presence the nurses needed.

Long-term care needs assessment
Sandra’s team is focused on training related to completing the resident assessment instrument (RAI), which a requirement for a patient to go on a wait list for long-term care. With more primary care nurses using the RAI, people are assessed as needing long-term care and put on a wait list earlier. The team’s health care aides supports community members until they are ready to transition to a long-term care home. Health care aides are an essential part of a community program and are critical to supporting patients who are at home, waiting to enter a long-term care home.

Diabetes education services
After the diabetes educator in Smithers had to decrease workload, waitlists for service were longer than usual. In response, two nurses are training to help educate new diabetics to give insulin, manage blood sugars, and decide what to do when the sugars are high or low. There’s been an incredible amount of training and cross-training done in general, as well as new diabetes work taken on by the nurses due to the back log of diabetes referrals.

Mental health services
To support mental health patients in Smithers, there are cognitive behavioural therapy groups that include members of the primary health care team. These teams teach people with mental health issues how to cook, shop, bank, take care of themselves, and more. The other team lead in Smithers, Cynthia Rondeau, works very hard to ensure there is quality mental health support for clients.

Cross-community support

When the team has struggled, they’ve received help from Hazelton and Houston, and they helped those communities in return. These three communities are working well together and being generous when it comes to helping wherever they can.

“The better connected we are with the people in the community, the better we can prevent admissions to the hospital and visits to the ER that are unnecessary,” says Sandra.

Sandra’s work, helping her team learn and grow as primary care nurses, has been instrumental to providing Smithers with skilled health care professionals.

Bailee Denicola

About Bailee Denicola

Bailee is a communications advisor in the Primary Care Department and was born and raised in Prince George. She graduated from UNBC with an anthropology degree and loves exploring cultures and learning about people. When not at work, Bailee can be found hanging out with her dogs, building her house with her husband, or travelling the world.

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Shared electronic medical record leads to better outcomes for Northern BC patients

Editor’s note: A condensed version of this story appeared on page 24 of the May 2019 issue of Canadian Healthcare Technology.

Dr Clifford and Alyssa posing together in front of a computer monitor.

Working together to design MOIS enhancements: Dr. Bill Clifford, Chief Medical Information Officer, Northern Health, and Alyssa Halliwell, Director – Support and Services, Applied Informatics for Health Society (AIHS). Photo by Darren Smit, smit,photography

Imagine being in charge of the health and wellness of 300,000 people scattered over a wild and remote area the size of France, where there’s one bear for every two people, ten-hour drives between communities are the norm, and winter brings temperatures of -20 C or below.

This is the challenge faced by Northern Health (NH), the organization responsible for providing health care in Northern British Columbia.

However, thanks to a new shared electronic medical record (EMR), health care providers in parts of Northern BC can now easily access the most up-to-date information about their patients at any time of the day or night, enabling them to provide better care.

The EMR in question is MOIS® (Medical Office Information System), developed in 1990 by Dr. Bill Clifford of Prince George, BC.

More than 11 years ago, Dr. Clifford selflessly donated the software to a not-for-profit, and now MOIS® is owned, collaboratively developed, administered, and licensed by the Applied Informatics for Health Society (AIHS). AIHS has been working with Northern Health ever since.

Recently, AIHS and Northern Health won the Technology in Healthcare Award at the 2019 Healthier You Awards in Prince George. AIHS and NH work together with health care providers to design and build a system capable of streamlining the often complex workflows involved in health care.

“We partner with Northern Health to improve efficiency and outcomes,” says AIHS CEO Bill Gordon.

“We’ve had a great partnership with AIHS for over a decade,” says Darren Ditto, NH Regional Manager, Clinical Applications & Specialty Care Solutions. “Things have changed and grown over the years, but what remains constant is that by working in partnership with our providers and AIHS, we collectively make MOIS® better able to serve our patients. Another huge benefit of AIHS is that they’re not-for-profit, so we can work on a system and not have to worry about the bottom line in deciding what features are included – it truly is for the good of the patient.”

Northern Health currently has several separate instances of the MOIS® EMR.

“We’re working with Northern Health to consolidate the instances and to reduce any barriers between health teams even more in an effort to provide the right information to the right people at the right time,” says Larry Chrobot, Senior Director at AIHS.

MOIS® functionality includes documenting and in many cases, electronically downloading, key elements of the patient medical record, including:

  • Encounter notes and measures
  • Prescriptions, long-term medications and labels
  • Health issues and rankings
  • Allergies and medication administration records
  • Past procedures
  • Diagnostic imaging reports
  • Consultation and referral reports
  • Patient preferences and care plans
  • Team-based communication, including EMR-to-EMR communication
  • Service documentation

Sharing this information between different members of the health care team is key in providing comprehensive, coordinated care.

MOIS® and Northern Health: Six stories of success

Headshot of a smiling Dr. Campbell.

Dr. Suzanne Campbell, a GP who works at the Omineca Medical Clinic in Vanderhoof.

Dr. Suzanne Campbell is a GP who works at the Omineca Medical Clinic in the small Northern BC farming community of Vanderhoof (pop. 4,439).

Northern Health is implementing changes to strengthen basic health care: they’re putting a model in place where an interprofessional team will support each physician’s or nurse practitioner’s office.

Depending on the size of the community, the interprofessional team can include nurses, physiotherapists, occupational therapists, social workers, and more. Dr. Campbell is an important part of the Vanderhoof interprofessional team: “While the patient has the most vested interest in their health outcome, the physician is the quarterback of team health care,” says Chrobot.

When the team began using the same MOIS® EMR, all team members, including Dr. Campbell, could view patient notes whenever needed, helping them provide continuous, coordinated care.

“The Omineca Medical Clinic in Vanderhoof was one of the very first clinics to put their hand up and ask for that integration in MOIS®,” says Chrobot. “They took that leap of faith in the pursuit of better patient outcomes. They were visionary, and one of the first in Northern BC to do that. For a clinic to take that on, that was tremendous.”

Below are six informal case studies highlighting the success of this new way of working, seen through the lens of this rural physician.

Checking in on a new mom’s challenges

Dr. Campbell’s patient Ashley[1] gave birth via c-section, returning afterwards to her remote rural home, where she struggles with cognitive challenges, as well as financial and transportation issues.

Dr. Campbell worried how Ashley would cope with a newborn, in addition to recovering from surgery, plus her other challenges. She feared that with Ashley’s transportation difficulties, it would be hard to provide the close monitoring and support she felt Ashely would need.

However, the interprofessional team was able to solve this communication problem using the shared MOIS® EMR: every time a nurse or community support worker visited Ashely at home, Dr. Campbell was immediately aware and could easily read their notes the same day. The team was able to support Ashley at home and minimize her travel. At the same time, Dr. Campbell was kept in the loop and was reassured that Ashley was recovering from her c-section, was coping with her other challenges, and that the baby was thriving.

Helping a senior stay out of hospital

Dorothy, a 90-year-old Vanderhoof resident, was clear about her priority to avoid spending time in hospital. She wanted to remain at home as much as possible, even though her health was declining. When she developed pneumonia and congestive heart failure, the interprofessional team was able to care for her at home thanks to daily nursing visits that were set up quickly with a simple message request through MOIS®.

The nurses who visited her each day recorded her vital signs and responses to treatment in the shared MOIS® chart, which Dr. Campbell could easily view. Dorothy also had a home visit from an occupational therapist, who arranged equipment to support her at home. As she responded to treatment, Dorothy’s nursing visits decreased as appropriate, to weekly, then monthly.

Throughout this time, the whole team, including nursing and occupational therapy, easily stayed up to date on Dorothy’s care because each member, including Dr. Campbell, was documenting their encounters with the patient in the same shared EMR.

Providing support after a fall

Debbie, 65, was recovering from a recent hip replacement when she fell and injured her knee. Dr. Campbell saw her in the emergency department on Friday afternoon and found that although Debbie wanted to be able to stay at home, her mobility and ability to look after herself were severely affected by both the hip surgery and new knee injury. To safely function at home over the next few weeks, she would need support and equipment from the interprofessional team in order.

Usually, in a rural area, someone like Debbie would have to spend the weekend in hospital while their doctor arranged the needed supports and ensured that everything was in place before discharge on Monday or Tuesday. Instead, Dr. Campbell was able to use the shared EMR to coordinate Debbie’s care. With a few messages sent through the EMR, she was able to confirm that the interprofessional team would see Debbie urgently on Monday, allowing her to feel comfortable about discharging this patient over the weekend.

On Monday morning, Dr. Campbell received a message in MOIS® to let her know that the team was looking after Debbie, and that the occupational therapist had already made a home visit that day. Because the team could communicate quickly and easily using the EMR, Debbie could avoid spending time in hospital.

Keeping everyone in the loop on a hospital readmission

Alyssa, a resident of Vanderhoof with multiple diseases and social challenges, had emergency abdominal surgery in nearby Prince George. Two days later, she was assumed to be stable enough to travel back to Vanderhoof and was discharged.

However, she quickly experienced complications and was readmitted to hospital in Vanderhoof for three days. Because of a delay in communication, Dr. Campbell didn’t know about Alyssa’s discharge and readmission.

The second time Alyssa was discharged, though, she was connected with the interprofessional team. The notes from this team in the shared chart now alerted Dr. Campbell that not only was Alyssa no longer in Prince George, but she’d suffered complications after her surgery and needed more support.

When Dr. Campbell discovered Alyssa was home, she also learned that the interprofessional team was already taking care of dressing changes and giving her the supports she needed. Although Dr. Campbell had been left out of the communication loop at first, she could easily see that Alyssa’s current needs were being met, because they’d been captured in the MOIS® EMR.

Heading off complications for an MS patient

Doris has severe multiple sclerosis, resulting in paralysis and many complications. With dedication and support from her husband, plus private home support, she’s able to live at home. However, she’s at a high risk of infection, and if she were admitted to hospital, this risk would significantly increase.

Doris lives in a rural area outside Vanderhoof. Dr. Campbell phones her regularly and makes occasional home visits. Recently, Doris was having some issues and it was important to determine whether she had an infection that needed treatment, or if it was something more complex.

Using the shared EMR in MOIS®, Dr. Campbell was able to connect with the nurse, who then made arrangements to visit Doris the next day. The nurse collected the necessary information and taught Doris’s husband how to provide the new care that his wife needed. This quick response helped to prevent unnecessary antibiotics, more complications, or a possible hospital admission for Doris.

Preparing for a difficult conversation

An oncology patient had an appointment to see a counsellor, but between the referral and the first appointment, her diagnosis sadly changed from hopeful to terminal.

Dr. Campbell was able to attend the daily meeting with the interprofessional team. This meant it was easy for her ask the counsellor to provide an update before the appointment that day. This direct conversation meant the counsellor was fully prepared going into the first support session with the patient.

Supporting a senior’s wish to die at home

Elaine, a 99-year-old Vanderhoof resident, wanted to die at home. She had significant medical problems, but was alert and could direct her own care and express her wishes. Elaine’s situation was complicated by the fact that she lived on a rural property many miles out of town.

Providing end-of-life care at home in a rural area is challenging because there’s limited medical home care available in the evening and on weekends. It’s only possible with a dedicated family and an excellent communication system.

The interprofessional team, including Dr. Campbell, regularly visited Elaine at home to look after her needs and keep her comfortable. All the team members charted their visits in MOIS® so they could stay updated in real time on any changes in Elaine’s needs and condition.

Eventually, Elaine’s life came to a peaceful end at home, according to her wishes.

Summary

To sum up, a shared electronic medical record in MOIS® benefits Northern BC patients in many ways. The fact that all members of the interprofessional care team can access the same information helps ensure coordinated care and leads to better outcomes for Northerners.

“AIHS and MOIS® for us means reliability, efficiency for our practice and organization,” says Dr. Cathy Textor, a family physician in Prince George, and the same is definitely true throughout Northern BC, including Vanderhoof and the Omineca Medical Clinic.

[1] All patient names and identifying details have been changed.

Bailee Denicola

About Bailee Denicola

Bailee is a communications advisor in the Primary Care Department and was born and raised in Prince George. She graduated from UNBC with an anthropology degree and loves exploring cultures and learning about people. When not at work, Bailee can be found hanging out with her dogs, building her house with her husband, or travelling the world.

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Community paramedics partner with Northern Health communities to increase access to care

Community paramedics are changing patient care in some communities in Northern Health. They’re helping increase access to basic health care services in non-urgent settings, in patients’ homes, or in the community. Throughout Northern Health, 26 communities have community paramedics helping patients.

Patients can see a community paramedic if they’re referred to them by their doctor or health care team, or when they’re discharged from the hospital.

Community paramedics are employed by BC Emergency Health Services, but they work very closely with the teams of health care professionals in the community.

In Fort St. James, the “biggest positive is she [the community paramedic] works really well and has a positive relationship with the First Nations bands. She’s a great liaison for information and understanding their culture,” says Cathy York, team lead for Fort St. James.

The health care team and the community paramedic in Fort St. James are encouraged to share information and they all have a great working relationship. The community paramedic does a lot with the First Nations bands on naloxone training for overdose prevention, and also educates people on diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and heart disease. She’s also starting to work with local schools to do naloxone training.

Fraser Lake saw benefits when the first community paramedic started. At the time, they were short on nurses, so it was difficult for them to have eyes on some of the people they were concerned about in the community.

“We’re so thrilled to have the program start here, and the paramedics are such an asset to the team,” says Lora Lee Pacheco, team lead for Fraser Lake.

The community paramedic attends team meetings (called “huddles”) in Fraser Lake, which has helped close loops and encourage open communication. If there’s a concern with a patient, the community paramedic will bring it up to the team and sometimes suggest that the physician pay a home visit. They’re proactive in their care and address people’s health concerns early on.

“For example, a man used to come in every second week to the doctor’s office and was going to the hospital once a month. Now, because of the home visits of the community paramedic, he hasn’t been in the hospital since July,” says Lora Lee. “It just goes to show how important it is to check in on people and how far this program goes to prevent hospital admissions.”

Fraser Lake’s community paramedic has also taken over naloxone and CPR training in the community itself, as well as in surrounding First Nations communities. To save time, she’s also spending 1-2 hours a week at the Autumn Services Centre to follow up with people she would normally do a home visit with.

In Burns Lake, the community paramedic started only a few months ago. Since then, the team has found that he’s able to catch concerns with patients earlier on than if they waited to see their doctor. To help prevent crises, he’ll bring patients with any concerns directly to the health care team – another great example of how community paramedics are partnering with Northern Health and the local community health care teams to provide better patient care.

Bailee Denicola

About Bailee Denicola

Bailee is a communications advisor in the Primary Care Department and was born and raised in Prince George. She graduated from UNBC with an anthropology degree and loves exploring cultures and learning about people. When not at work, Bailee can be found hanging out with her dogs, building her house with her husband, or travelling the world.

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Peritoneal dialysis and home hemodialysis are helping people with kidney disease have more freedom in their lives

A home hemodialysis educator shows a patient one of the machines.

Dialysis patient Jerry Beck and Home Hemodialysis Educator Susan Rawlings. The dialysis machine pictured is one of the two types of home hemodialysis machines available to patients.

For many, dialysis can feel like a loss of independence because of the ongoing need for hospital appointments and time spent away from home. The availability of peritoneal dialysis (PD) and home hemodialysis allows many people to be involved in their daily treatments and bring back a sense of freedom to their self-management and care.

“I truly believe in the benefits of people being able to do this at home. At first it can sound complicated, but when people start training even after the first day, their anxiety goes down and they feel very proud of themselves,” says Karen Walkey, Patient Care Coordinator, UHNBC Peritoneal Dialysis. “It’s very doable and very learnable, and I am very proud of our patients who are willing to take this on and do such a good job with it and continue living their lives.”

A Peritoneal Dialysis system and diagram of a kidney.

Peritoneal Dialysis twin bag system with all the supplies needed to do a dialysis exchange.

PD is a type of dialysis that is done at home on a daily basis. It involves having a small tube in the abdomen and uses the lining of the abdomen (called the peritoneum) and a cleaning solution to clean the blood. The solution absorbs waste and fluid from blood, using the peritoneum as a filter.

There are many health and lifestyle benefits of PD that help patients combat the challenges they face living with kidney failure. PD treatments can be done in any place that is clean and dry, allowing a person more freedom to work, travel, or do other activities they enjoy without worrying about scheduling dialysis appointments. And, importantly, patients have the opportunity to improve their quality of life by participating in their care plans.

For those patients who are unable to do PD, home hemodialysis may also be an option. In hemodialysis, a machine and a special filter called a dialyzer are used to clean the blood, with the dialyzer acting as an artificial kidney. This requires having an in home hemodialysis machine.

Living outside of an area that has a dialysis unit can sometimes mean a patient having to move out of their community; with home hemodialysis, patients are able to stay in their communities and receive the treatment they need.

Two Home Hemodialysis Educators posing.

Angela Robinson (left) and Susan Rawlings, Home Hemodialysis Educators at the Northern Independent Dialysis Unit at Parkwood Mall in Prince George.

“We want to keep our patients in their communities. Instead of hemodialysis running their lives, we want to fit hemodialysis into the lives they already have,” says Angela Robinson, Home Hemodialysis Educator.

Lifestyle benefits of this mobile dialysis therapy and flexible schedule allow for most patients to perform therapy while at home, at work, at school, or on vacation. Patients can spend more time with loved ones, doing the things they enjoy.

Northern Health has the highest percentage of independent hemodialysis patients in the province, with 34% of dialysis patients on PD and 13.3% on home hemodialysis. These figures are well above the suggested provincial amounts in communities such as Prince Rupert, Fort Nelson, Quesnel, Prince George, Dawson Creek, and many others in between.

For more information and resources on independent dialysis, visit the BC Renal Agency website.

Sanja Knezevic

About Sanja Knezevic

Sanja is a communications advisor with Northern Health’s medical affairs department and is based in Prince George. She moved to Canada in 1995 from former Yugoslavia to Fort Nelson where she lived for a few years before moving to Prince George in 2000. Sanja enjoys photography, curling up with a good book, cooking and spending time with her friends and family.

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On-site health clinic provides a range of services to students at UNBC

Kara Hunter posing at UNBC.University students are in a unique situation. For most, it’s the first time they’ve lived away from home. On top of that, they’re trying to navigate their studies, and most don’t have a local health care provider. Simple health concerns can become more serious while they try to figure out where to get help.

To help keep students healthy, the on-site Health Services Clinic at the University of Northern British Columbia’s (UNBC) main campus in Prince George has a strong team of health care professionals that can meet most student health care needs:

  • Counsellors
  • General practitioner physician
  • Nurse practitioners
  • Occupational therapist
  • Psychiatrist
  • Registered nurses
  • Registered psychiatric nurse

Among the services the clinic provides are physical and mental health assessments and treatment, immunizations, health care for sexual and reproductive issues, and chronic disease management.

One of the dedicated team members is Nurse Practitioner Kara Hunter, who has worked at Northern Health for over 20 years. Most of her career was spent as a registered nurse in critical care. After completing her master’s degree, she starting work as a nurse practitioner in 2015.

“In this clinic, we can make a huge impact with students and their overall wellness,” says Kara. “Typically each provider sees between 15 and 20 students a day. On extremely busy days we can see up to 25. Appointments are scheduled, and twice a week we offer drop-in times.”

Due to the recent opioid crisis, the team has devoted a lot of time to training students to use naloxone kits. Kits were distributed to students so they could administer the drug to anyone potentially overdosing.

“This past September and October, we trained over 100 students and residence advisors on how to administer naloxone,” says Kara. “We want to make sure that if someone does overdose, students know how to help.”

Another area Kara works in is sexual and reproductive health: “In 2019, we’re trialing group appointments, specifically targeting contraceptive counselling and the use of intrauterine (IUD) devices,” she says.

There’s no limit on the number of students that can attend each group appointment. Students who want more information after the group appointment can book a follow-up appointment at the clinic.

Thanks to the on-site clinic, UNBC students have one less thing to worry about when they arrive in Prince George. For more information, visit the Wellness Centre Health Services website.

Tamara Reichert

About Tamara Reichert

Tamara is the communications advisor for the innovation and development commons at Northern Health where she works on a number of projects with the research, quality improvement, clinical simulation, and education teams. Born and raised in Prince George, Tamara grew up on a ranch where she rode horses, played with farm animals, built forts, and raided the family garden. She enjoys spending time travelling, hiking, cooking, reading, and cheering for her favourite sports teams.

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Fort St. John Hospital and other NH facilities win outstanding awards in lab services

The lab technologist team standing with the certificate awards.
Medical Lab Technologists Matthew Coburn, Laurel Coburn (related by marriage), and Carlee Bryson with Fort St. John Hospital’s three awards.

Congratulations to Fort St. John Hospital staff for recently receiving three outstanding achievement awards from the BC Provincial Blood Coordinating Office.

“The achievements are a testament to the donors of British Columbia, that our labs in Northern Health are great stewards, for their selfless act in helping others through their donation of blood products,” says Julius Valido, Quality Resource Technologist at the University Hospital of Northern BC (UHNBC) in Prince George.

The recognition is related to the hospital’s efficient usage of blood products, donor red cells, and IV immune globulin (IVIG).

“It is also a recognition that Northern Health is motivated to reduce the unnecessary cost to healthcare,” says Julius, “and to the public sector by diminishing inventory wastage and transportation of products to and from the suppliers and within lab sites.”

The three outstanding achievement awards are:

  • Award for Outstanding Achievement in 0% Red Cell Outdate Rate: The lab used all donor red cells before they expired. Red cells have an average shelf-life of 45 days.
  • Award for Outstanding 0% Expiry Rate of all Factor products: The lab used all blood products and derivatives, such as coagulation factors, before they expired.
  • Award for Outstanding 0% IVIG Discard and Outdate Rate: The lab used all IV immune globulin (IVIG) before its expiration date. IVIG is produced from healthy human blood to help fight infections for patients with a weakened immune system; and it’s very expensive, at $65 per gram. Some patients need 1000-2000 grams. The lab not only used the product before the expiration date, but it also handled it with care during shipping and receiving, and placed it in temperature controlled storage before being used for various approved conditions other than weakened immune systems.

Several other Northern Health facilities won awards and honourable mentions (see below). Keep an eye out for a full story in the upcoming Northern Way magazine. We’ll take an in-depth look at what these awards mean to Northern Health patients and how the lab teams achieved these amazing results.

Congratulations to everyone!

Honourable Mention for Achievement of a Red Cell Outdate Rate Below 1%

  • Prince Rupert Regional Hospital
  • University Hospital of Northern BC

Award for Outstanding 0% Expiry Rate of all Factor Products

  • Bulkley Valley District Hospital
  • Dawson Creek and District Hospital
  • Fort St. John Hospital
  • G.R. Baker Memorial Hospital
  • Mills Memorial Hospital
  • Prince Rupert Regional Hospital
  • University Hospital of Northern BC

Award for Outstanding 0% IVIG Discard and Outdate Rate

  • Bulkley Valley & District Hospital
  • Fort St. John Hospital
  • G.R. Baker Memorial Hospital
  • Haida Gwaii Hospital and Health Centre
  • Mills Memorial Hospital
  • Prince Rupert Regional Hospital
  • St. John Hospital
  • Stuart Lake Hospital
  • Wrinch Memorial Hospital
Brandan Spyker

About Brandan Spyker

Brandan works in digital communications at NH. He helps manage our staff Intranet but also creates graphics, monitors social media and shoots video for NH. Born and raised in Prince George, Brandan started out in TV broadcasting as a technical director before making the jump into healthcare. Outside of work he enjoys spending quality time and travelling with his wife, daughter and son. He’s a techie/nerd. He likes learning about all the new tech and he's a big Star Wars fan. He also enjoys watching and playing sports.

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Northern Health MRI Improvements: Rikki Furmanek

“We also are able to accommodate surrounding areas such as Fort Nelson, Chetwynd, Taylor – people don’t have to travel very far, especially in the wintertime, so that’s great.”

In this video, Rikki Furmanek, Northern Health X-ray Technician, mentions the benefits that a new MRI machine brings to her hometown, Fort St. John, and what it does for the Northeast!

You can also see how the MRI machine was installed, which includes a big lift through a window at the hospital.

Thanks to additional provincial investments in MRI services across the province, Northern Health is expected to increase the number of MRIs performed by 70% over last year, and an additional 102 MRI hours of operation have been added (between the Fort St. John, Prince George, and Terrace MRI locations).

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Northern Health MRI Improvements: Shyr Chui and Danita Braun

“Fifteen minutes later I got a call from the MRI booking office, and they told me they wanted me in the next day in the evening… and I was dumbfounded, because I was expecting it to be a 6 week wait for this appointment!”

In this video, we hear from patient Danita Braun, who was thrilled to hear the wait time of her MRI appointment was drastically cut down. Getting the MRI done sooner also meant a change in her care plan which she was thrilled to hear!

Also featured, Shyr Chui, Northern Health Radiologist, mentions how scanning hours have also changed, adding evening times and weekends!

Thanks to additional provincial investments in MRI services across the province, Northern Health is expected to increase the number of MRIs performed by 70% over last year, and an additional 102 MRI hours of operation have been added (between the Fort St. John, Prince George, and Terrace MRI locations).

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Northern Health MRI Improvements: Marina Downs and Margaret Kostyshyn

“This has increased patient happiness, and the morale of our technologists.”

In this video, Marina Downs, Northern Health Diagnostic Imaging Manager, speaks on how the addition of the MRI machine in Terrace has reduced patient wait times and travel, directly affecting the experience of both staff and patients.

Margeret Kostyshyn, a recent UHNBC patient, mentions how her MRI experience was “very positive,” and how the reassuring staff took away her initial fears of the process.

Thanks to additional provincial investments in MRI services across the province, Northern Health is expected to increase the number of MRIs performed by 70% over last year, and an additional 102 MRI hours of operation have been added (between the Fort St. John, Prince George, and Terrace MRI locations).

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Northern Health MRI Improvements: Ken Winnig and Karen Eldridge

“About a year ago, we were only able to do about 7,500 MRIs. Today, we’re on target to do over 13,000.”

There’s some pretty exciting MRI news circulating throughout the North! Since the installation of the two new machines in Terrace and Fort St. John, and a new replacement unit in Prince George, the northern region has seen some pretty incredible results.

In this video, Ken Winnig, Northern Health Regional Director of Diagnostic Services, explains the benefits of the new machines. Additionally, hear from Karen Eldridge, a recent patient, who’s been positively impacted!

Thanks to additional provincial investments in MRI services across the province, Northern Health is expected to increase the number of MRIs performed by 70% over last year, and an additional 102 MRI hours of operation have been added (between the Fort St. John, Prince George, and Terrace MRI locations).

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