Healthy Living in the North

Rethink your drink: Choosing healthy beverages

Cutting board with sliced cucumber, cut strawberries, and a glass of water.

The gold standard for hydration is water! If the crisp, clean taste of water just isn’t to your liking, try adding a few fruit or vegetable slices to your glass or water bottle!

Does this scenario sound familiar? You return home after a long day at work, you have a headache, and your mouth feels like the Sahara. It’s only then that you realize that you haven’t had a drop to drink all day!

You’ve probably heard that the human body has a lot of water – and you’d be right! On average, water makes up about 60% of your body weight. This means that the average man contains roughly 42 litres of water! During our busy workday, we are constantly losing water to the environment (think sweat, breath, and pee). Since so many body functions rely on water, it’s very important to replace water lost during daily activities.

Keeping hydrated during your busy workday will help you to feel on top of your game. Listen to your body’s cues. You may need a drink when you feel:

  • a headache,
  • hungry despite having just eaten (sometimes thirst masquerades as hunger),
  • dry, cracked lips, or
  • thirsty!

But what should you choose to drink? There are many beverage options these days and some drinks are better than others for keeping hydrated.

The gold standard for hydration? Water!

Since we’re largely made of water, doesn’t it make sense to drink it? Bring a reusable water bottle to work and keep it filled. If you just can’t get into the taste of plain water, try adding a wedge of lemon or lime. Get even more creative by adding a combo of sliced cucumbers and strawberries to flavour your water!

Other good hydrating choices:

Milk

Milk has nutrients like calcium, protein, and vitamin D.

Tea and coffee

Contrary to popular myth, tea and coffee are not dehydrating. If you enjoy caffeinated coffee or tea, limit yourself to four 250 ml cups per day or choose decaf coffee and herbal teas instead. Remember that most medium-sized coffees are actually closer to two cups! Also, if you tend to add cream and/or sugar to your coffee or tea, keep in mind the extra calories you are drinking.

Drinks to rethink (choose less often):

Juice

While most juices are marketed as healthy because they have some vitamins and minerals, they also contain a lot of sugar! You’re better off eating your fruits whole and skipping the juice.

Fancy coffee

Think ooey-gooey caramel macchiatos, syrupy-sweet french vanillas, and everything in between! These coffee drinks have so much added sugar and fat that they could pass for dessert in a mug! Consider them to be desserts and save them for occasional treats instead.

Pop

Pop or soda is completely devoid of nutrients and full of added sugar (and often caffeine, too). Remember that viral video of cola dissolving a penny? That’s because pop has added acid and just like the penny, acid in pop will also damage your teeth! Diet pop may be missing the sugars, but will still damage your teeth, so give it a pass as well.

Vitamin water

These types of drinks are marketed as “healthy” by using the word water in their names, but they often contain more sugar than you’d think and may have vitamins in excess of safe limits.

Energy drinks

These beverages may claim to give you a boost, but they usually contain large amounts of caffeine and sugar. Some energy drinks may also contain unsafe and untested additives. You may feel a short-term gain in energy, but later on, you’re almost sure to crash.

When it comes to staying hydrated at work remember: Follow your thirst! H2O is the way to go!


Northern Health’s nutrition team has created these blog posts to promote healthy eating, celebrate Nutrition Month, and give you the tools you need to complete the Eating 9 to 5 challenge! Visit the contest page and complete weekly themed challenges for great prizes including cookbooks, lunch bags, and a Vitamix blender!

Carly Phinney

About Carly Phinney

Born in Vancouver, raised in the Okanagan, and a recent transplant to the North, Carly Phinney is a Clinical Dietitian at UHNBC. Carly’s interest in food started in the kitchen with her mother - watching her mother’s talent for just “throwing something together” from whatever was in fridge. She loves that, through food and nutrition, she is able to touch people’s lives and help them to make small but sustainable changes that can greatly improve their overall quality of life. Outside of work, you can find Carly in her kitchen baking up a storm or in the mountains hiking in the summer and skiing in the winter.

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