Healthy Living in the North

Northern Indigenous wellness funding: Accepting applications

An image gives details related to the funding.First Nations, Inuit, and Métis communities, organizations, and health centres can apply for up to $5,000 in funding to support community-based initiatives that focus on holistic health and wellness! Apply today – the deadline is December 6, 2019!

Who’s eligible for funding?
Applicants must be:

  • Located within Northern BC (the NH region and the FNHA Northern Region)
  • An Indigenous community organization or health centre, or a First Nations Band

Your project must support a community project and focus on one or more of the following:

  • cultural safety
  • primary care
  • mental wellness and substance use
  • population and public health: community wellness activities for Indigenous youth and Elders

Preferred projects will:

  • Encourage different groups to work together towards a common goal. Groups might include:
    • Community members (youth, families, Elders, etc.)
    • Health staff (Band, NH, FNHA)
    • Physicians
    • Aboriginal/Indigenous Health Improvement Committees (A/IHICs)
    • Other communities
  • Support health and well-being by combining Indigenous wellness approaches with current health care approaches.
  • Build healthy relationships and improve how people connect with each other, their families, and their community (e.g., community holiday gatherings).
  • Build capacity in and train local First Nations and Indigenous staff and community members.

About the Wellness Funding Awards

Since 2015, Northern Health (NH) and First Nation’s Health Authority (FNHA) have collaborated to offer Northern Indigenous Community Wellness Funding Awards.

For more information

For more information or to submit completed applications, please contact us by one of the following:

  • Email: Health@northernhealth.ca
  • Phone: 250-649-7226
  • Mail:
    Northern Health Indigenous Health
    600 – 299 Victoria Street
    Prince George, BC V2L 5B8
  • Fax: 250-564-7198

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Shelby Petersen

About Shelby Petersen

Shelby is the Web Services Coordinator with Indigenous Health. Shelby has over five years of experience working in content development and digital marketing. After graduating with a degree in Political Science from UNBC, Shelby moved to Vancouver where she pursued a career in digital marketing. Most recently, Shelby was the Senior Content Developer and Project Manager with a digital advertising agency in Vancouver, British Columbia. Born and raised in Prince George, Shelby is thrilled to be back in the community and spending time outside enjoying everything that the North has to offer.

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Chetwynd’s First Annual World Mental Health Day: “Walk and Talk”

A smiling woman and a smiling man wearing sunglasses, both in high vis vests, pose for a selfie outside on a dirt road.

L-R: Organizers Charla Brazeau, Primary Care Nurse, Interprofessional Team 1; and Stan Fraser

Each year, organizations across the globe observe World Mental Health Day on October 10, a day that started in 1992 to promote mental health advocacy and to educate the public on relevant issues and topics.

This year, to commemorate the day, NH staff and residents in Chetwynd, BC organized the first annual Walk and Talk. Despite the brisk weather, dozens of people came out to show their support and help end the stigma.

The 26 km trek from Moberly Lake to Chetwynd encouraged participants to talk about their personal relationship with mental health, ask questions, and show that no one has to suffer alone.

Organized by Charla Brazeau, Primary Care Nurse, Chetwynd General Hospital, and local mental health advocate, Stan Fraser, the Walk and Talk had support from Northern Health, Saulteau Frist Nation, Chetwynd RCMP, Gerry’s Groceries, and Tim Hortons.

A man in a high vis vest walks along the side of a road with a young girl who is looking up at him.

Stan Fraser walks with the event’s attendees.

“Mental health is often overlooked as a ‘silent illness’,” says Charla. “This event was to make people aware that they are not alone in having a mental illness and there is always someone there who will be there for you and have a listening ear.”

Organizers are thrilled with the event’s success and hope to see even more people make it out next year.

Two smiling women pose for a selfie outside on a road lined with snow and trees.

L-R: Oshen Walker, Aboriginal Patient Liaison; and Charla Brazeau, Primary Care Nurse, Interprofessional Team 1

A view of a tree lined lake, hills on the horizon, and the sun shining in the sky.

The spectacular view from along the walk.

Two smiling women pose for a selfie inside a vehicle with a case of bottled water.

L-R: Oshen Walker, Aboriginal Patient Liaison; and Leona Clark, Saulteau First Nation Community Health Nurse.

A police SUV with lights and an unmarked police truck on the road next to a walker.

Walk and Talk participants get an official RCMP escort.

Shelby Petersen

About Shelby Petersen

Shelby is the Web Services Coordinator with Indigenous Health. Shelby has over five years of experience working in content development and digital marketing. After graduating with a degree in Political Science from UNBC, Shelby moved to Vancouver where she pursued a career in digital marketing. Most recently, Shelby was the Senior Content Developer and Project Manager with a digital advertising agency in Vancouver, British Columbia. Born and raised in Prince George, Shelby is thrilled to be back in the community and spending time outside enjoying everything that the North has to offer.

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Mamma Mia in a small town

Members of Vanderhoof's Mamma Mia the musical performance pose in costume.

Members of Vanderhoof’s Mamma Mia the musical performance pose in costume.

In 2018, I had the unique opportunity to work with a number of my Vanderhoof colleagues in a community musical theater production of the hit movie, Mamma Mia.

Without prior knowledge of my colleagues’ hidden talents, I auditioned, only to find several of them were also involved in the production in various roles: chorus, leads, costume design, band members, backstage crew, and more.

As it turns out, talent in rural medicine is not limited to the hospital or clinic, but extends into the fabric of the community-focused, small-town lifestyle.

Having worked with so many driven, career-focused individuals in medical school and residency, it was easy to forget that there are other things in life beyond medicine.

Who knew that by joining a busy, full-scope rural practice, I would get whisked away with a group of super creative and outrageously musically inclined friends?

It exposed me to another side of rural medicine that I couldn’t have anticipated: “science geeks” can have a wildly artistic and creative side.

Despite our busy lives, we all managed to find time to join other community members to put together what I think is by far the best musical production of Mamma Mia outside the Silver Screen.

Whenever my children sing songs from the play or I talk about the production with friends, I remember how the stress of our day-to-day lives in the ER or clinic melted away when we were on stage.

The shop talk was left at the door as we joined our cast and crew and focused on delivering the best team performance of Lisa Striegler’s inspired interpretation of the musical.

Several months have passed, and it’s still hard to believe that the collective and passionate journey from first auditions to performing in front of a sold-out audience is actually over.

The pressure of gruelling practices, memorizing lines and dance moves, and remembering where to stand all paled in comparison to the uplifting solidarity and camaraderie of the Mamma Mia family.

Although this chapter has come to an end, every time I greet one of my fellow cast members in the community, I have a deeper understanding that we are family and have shared a sacred experience.

Performing in the production of Mamma Mia has enlightened me to the strong and unwavering love within the town of Vanderhoof. It is my pleasure to serve and be a member of such an amazing and welcoming community.

Dr. Aryn Khan

About Dr. Aryn Khan

Dr. Aryn Khan was born in Burns Lake, BC and always dreamed of becoming a rural doctor. She received her medical degree from the University of Alberta in Edmonton, and in 2016 she moved to Vanderhoof with her family. Dr. Khan is currently on the Medical Staff Association for St. John Hospital and chair of their Facility Engagement. Her life is busy with three amazing kids, two dogs, three cats, two parrots, and one husband and the best job in the world: rural family medicine in Vanderhoof!

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A picture-perfect partnership: Prince George photographer donates photographs to reconnect long-term care residents with their community

Two female Gateway Lodge residents in motorized wheelchairs are in a hallway. They are admiring a picture hanging on the wall. The picture has a rusted bridge in the foreground and a river, trees, and sky in the background.

Gateway Lodge residents Ilse and Diana can admire photographs of places they know thanks to a partnership with local photographer Anna Michele McCue. Photo courtesy of Anna Michele McCue.

They say, “A picture is worth a thousand words.” Lynn AuCoin hopes the pictures hanging in Gateway Lodge bring more than words – even a thousand of them. She hopes each image helps residents reconnect with their community.

“We’ve been trying to make our facilities more home-like,” says Lynn, the Recreation Therapist Supervisor for Gateway Lodge’s complex care and Rainbow Lodge in Prince George. “Our residents enter a new stage in their lives. Suddenly, they’re getting regular care and help in a new place. We want to see our hallways filled with things that residents can relate to and talk about. Whether that’s milking the cow, riding the tractor, or enjoying the sunset or local places.”

In a beige hallway, a picture of a long haired, black and brown dachshund in a wagon hangs above a chair.

This image of a dog in a wagon is a favourite among Gateway Lodge residents. Photo courtesy of Anna Michele McCue.

Lynn is a member of a Prince George Facebook group that shares good news and local photography. In February 2019, she was scrolling through it and several stunning photos caught her eye. Lynn noticed they were all by a photographer named Anna Michele McCue, who goes by Michele. Lynn reached out to Michele right away.

“We didn’t have a big budget for this, so I was hoping we could work something out,” says Lynn. “Michele got back to me right away. She loved the idea of connecting residents with their communities. She offered her pictures at no cost!”

Thanks to Michele’s generosity, nine pictures are now hanging throughout Gateway Lodge.

A picture of a Prince George street in the fall hangs on a wall. The street is centred and continues for several blocks. It is covered in yellow leaves. On either side of the street there are tall trees with yellow leaves that have yet to fall, and houses.

Another example of a picture by Anna Michele McCue that is hanging in Gateway Lodge. Photo courtesy of Anna Michele McCue.

“I’m so pleased that my photography is bringing joy to people,” says Michele. “Seniors, who have contributed so much, are an important part of our community. It means the world to help remind them of how they lived, what they accomplished, and what they enjoyed.”

Michele isn’t the only one who’s pleased. These trips down memory lane are getting rave reviews from Gateway residents as well.

“They add beauty and colour to our empty walls,” says Margaret, a resident of Gateway Lodge. “We all enjoy finding out the location of where a photo was taken.”

Lynn notes that other Northern Health long-term care facilities may see local photography on their walls in the future.

Mike Erickson

About Mike Erickson

Mike Erickson is the Communications Specialist, Content Development and Engagement at Northern Health, and has been with the organization since 2013. He grew up in the Lower Mainland and has called Prince George home since 2007. In his spare time, Mike enjoys spending time with friends and family, sports, reading, movies, and generally nerding out. He loves the slower pace of life and lack of traffic in the North.

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Connecting a community one meal at a time

Two program volunteers at the Terrace health unit.
From left to right: Kristen Gogag and Linda Preston are Primary Care Assistants at the Terrace Health Unit and both help run the Terrace Meals on Wheels program.

Sometimes the smallest act can have the biggest impact. For Meals on Wheels volunteers in Terrace, that small act is delivering meals to seniors in the community. However, the benefits of the program go far beyond just filling someone’s belly.

The Terrace Meals on Wheels program

Meals on Wheels is a program that delivers hot and cold or frozen meals on Monday, Wednesday, and Thursday mornings each week (except stat holidays).

Linda Preston, a Northern Health Primary Care Assistant at the Terrace health unit, helps coordinate the program’s meal deliveries.

“It’s a program to deliver meals to people who are elderly, shut in, recovering from surgery, or have mobility or other issues. They can’t always get out and they feel safe in their home,” says Linda, who’s been part of the program since June 2018. “Having someone come to their home with a meal helps them.”

Kristen Gogag, also a Primary Care Assistant at the health unit, handles the administrative side of things. “I’ve helped out with the program for the last two and a half years. I help with questions as needed when people come into the health unit. Linda is more on the run,” says Kristen.

“Kristen is great to have at the health unit,” says Linda. “She can provide information to people and can give them the form to fill out or brochures.”

25 years of meals and smiles

According to the pair, their involvement is relatively brief compared to some program volunteers.

“The program has been running in Terrace for the last 25 years. We have some volunteers who have been a part of it since it started,” shares Kristen. “One of our volunteers, Arlene, has been doing it for 24 years. Another one of our volunteers, James, has been with us for 15-20 years.”

The program was started to help people stay at home rather than at the hospital, as well as help with nutrition and mental wellness – especially social connectedness. These have positive health impacts for both the client and program volunteers.

Who benefits from Meals on Wheels?

When posed this question, Linda was resolute: “Everyone benefits. The person getting the meal gets some contact and interactions. The family of the person receiving the meal benefits as they know their family member is getting a meal and having someone check in. This person can stay in their home rather than going into a facility.”

Some might wonder what the boundaries are for this service: “There are no boundaries,” laughs Kristen. “If we have volunteers, we deliver. If there’s not as many volunteers, it just might take a bit longer,” she adds. “We’re actually looking for more volunteers right now.”

Meals on Wheels graphic

It’s more than just a meal

For Linda, the most rewarding thing about being part of the program is the connection with those receiving the meals.

“I have a little conversation [with the meal recipient]. They get some contact and an interaction,” says Linda. “Sometimes they need me to read something for them like a calendar because they can’t see. They know we’re coming and it brightens up their day. The meal helps them too. The interaction for me, is the most rewarding.”

For Kristen, it’s getting to know the clients: “You see the same people and you get to know them. They like to show off their family and stuff. I’ve had a couple of clients pass away since I started and that’s hard but that’s life. I miss it now that I’m in more of an administrative role. Delivering, you get to be out in the community and visit. Now I do more of the paperwork side of it. Linda and I sit beside each other at the health unit so it’s nice to get updates from her on clients and know how a particular person is doing.”

Delivery volunteers needed!

Right now Meals on Wheels is looking for anyone who can help with meal delivery. Kristen advises that volunteers should have the following to qualify:

  • Personal vehicle
  • Valid driver’s license
  • Clean criminal record check
  • Clean driver’s abstract
  • Available at least one day per week

Linda stresses the importance of the program: “It isn’t just delivering meals – it’s touching the community.”

Pride tinges Kristen’s voice when she talks about it: “It’s a really good program. It gets people more involved in the community. Delivery volunteers might be lonely too. It helps them get out and help. They could be a widow – it gives them someone to visit. Or they could be retired and need something to do. Or they could be new to the community and want to get connected. We had two ladies recently who were new to Terrace – they just wanted to do something.”

The program doesn’t deliver on statuary holidays but Kristen emphasizes, “We never leave our clients hanging. We offer our clients the option of having extra meals delivered the day prior to the holiday.”

For more information or to volunteer

Please call Linda at the Terrace Health Unit at 250 631-4260.

Haylee Seiter

About Haylee Seiter

Haylee is a communications advisor for Public and Population Health. She grew up in Prince George and is proud to call Northern BC home. During university she found her passion for health promotions by volunteering with the Canadian Cancer Society and became interested in marketing through the UNBC JDC West team. When she's not dreaming up communications strategies, she can be found cycling with the Wheelin Warriors or spending time with family and friends. (NH Blog Admin)

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Breastfeeding-friendly spaces: Make breastfeeding your business

Breastfeeding friendly spaces decal stating, "we welcome you to breastfeed any time, anywhere."Protecting, promoting, and supporting breastfeeding takes an entire community, big and small. That’s why Northern Health is happy to support a provincial-wide initiative to encourage breastfeeding-friendly spaces across the north.

The Breastfeeding-Friendly Spaces program has created a toolkit to help businesses and organizations create a welcoming, breastfeeding-friendly space for all families. The toolkit includes:

  • A window decal, featuring the universal breastfeeding symbol, to be prominently displayed in front windows. Displaying this decal shows your commitment to support breastfeeding.
  • A companion tip sheet that offers information about how employers and staff can support breastfeeding families.

The importance of breastfeeding

Did you know that a woman’s right to breastfeed is protected by law in BC? As per BC’s Ministry of Justice:

  • Nursing mothers have the right to breastfeed their children in a public area.
  • It’s discriminatory to ask a mother to cover up or breastfeed somewhere else.

While these facts are not new, it may not be common knowledge. Northern Health is committed to supporting breastfeeding-friendly spaces across northern BC. We encourage all businesses and organizations to do their part to contribute to a positive community that recognizes the importance of breastfeeding!

Breastfeeding friendly spaces decal on the window of the library entrance.

Ignacio Albarracin, Public Service Manager for the Prince George Public Library, stands at the library’s entrance with the new provincial Breastfeeding-Friendly Spaces decal displayed.

A closer look

The Prince George Public Library is one in a growing list of northern BC organizations that is proud to declare their facility to be a breastfeeding-friendly space.

“The public library is a welcoming space, it’s an inclusive space, and serving households with children is one of our core services,” says Ignacio Albarracin, the library’s Public Service Manager, about why they have put up the decal. “We understand that it’s the law, that women have a right to breastfeed anywhere, and this is also consistent with our values to make this a family-friendly space. We want mothers to feel that it’s safe and appropriate to bring their children here. We want them to feel that they’re not going to be bothered or judged if they breastfeed their children here.”

This breastfeeding-friendly spaces decal and tip sheet were created in partnership with Perinatal Services BC, all BC health authorities, the Ministry of Health, and the BC Baby Friendly Network. The new program will be replacing Northern Health’s existing “Growing for Gold” program, which was developed for the 2015 Canada Winter Games and featured a window decal stating, “Naturally, you can breastfeed here.” We appreciate the northern businesses and organizations who have supported this initiative and they can expect a new toolkit in the mail very soon.

When you order a decal, your business/facility will be added to the list of breastfeeding-friendly spaces on the Northern Health website. Help us send this important message: “We welcome you to breastfeed any time, anywhere,” by requesting your decal now!

Want to do more? Consider displaying these posters as well:

Jessica Quinn

About Jessica Quinn

Jessica Quinn is the regional manager of digital communications and public engagement for Northern Health, where she is actively involved in promoting the great work of NH staff to encourage healthy, well and active lifestyles. She manages NH's content channels, including social media (Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, etc). When she's not working, Jessica stays active by exploring the beautiful outdoors around Prince George via kayak, hiking boots, or snowshoes, and she has recently completed her master's degree in professional communications from Royal Roads University, with a focus on the use of social media in health care.
(NH Blog Admin)

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Walk with your Doc: Tumbler Ridge

During the Walk with Your Doc event, Tumbler Ridge was the furthest northern community to participate. With a practicing physician, three nurses, and various other members of the healthcare team, the walk went off with a resounding bang at Flatbed Loops!a woman flexing and smiling while participating.

Community Paramedic Joan Zimmer, who organized the event, was also seen there giving out free pedometers (along with volunteers) and participating herself. Everyone was eager to get out in the beautiful outdoors as the weather had only been getting warmer! It was a rewarding way to support fitness, health, and personal connection to the community.crowd of people participating and waving.

We hope to have many more events like this, and would like to personally thank every person who came out to show their support!

See you next year!

Joan Zimmer

About Joan Zimmer

Joan Zimmer is the 1st Community Paramedic in her area to work with a local health care team bringing free services, health promotion, conducting wellness clinics, and weekly scheduled visits to patients living with chronic disease. Joan works through the British Columbia Emergency Health Service.

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“3D”: Drugs, Dinos, and Dinner – Another unique conference in Tumbler Ridge

By Dr. Charles Helm & Heather Gummow

The second “3D conference” – Drugs, Dinos and Dinner – was held in Tumbler Ridge from May 25–27. Nearly 70 physicians, pharmacists, paramedics and nurses registered, a number that swelled to 120 at the Saturday evening banquet with the inclusion of spouses and families. This was probably the largest ever medical gathering in northeast BC.

Physicians are learning tendon repair using pigs' legs.

Dr. Stuart Johnston teaching tendon repair and skin flaps (using pigs’ legs) to Dr. Kalun Boudreau, Fort St. John and James Wilkie, Resident physician, Fort St. John. Dr. Charles Helm, Chief of Staff Tumbler Ridge, observing.

Conference participants were treated to ten hours of stimulating talks, featuring Tom Perry, Rita McCracken, Cait O’Sullivan, and Emma Reid of the Therapeutics Initiative, a UBC-based think-tank that rigorously analyzes evidence on which medications work and which don’t. “Deprescribing” was emphasized – trying to get by with fewer medications and eliminating those that may be harmful. Dr. Stuart Johnston provided a talk on hand injuries and conducted a practical workshop on tendon repair and skin flaps (using pigs’ legs), and Dr. Trevor Campbell spoke engagingly on non-drug treatment of chronic pain. Five exhibitor booths provided for extra learning opportunities, all completely free of pharmaceutical industry involvement.

So far, that’s not too unusual for a northern BC medical conference, but many similarities end there. Firstly, there was no registration fee for the 3D conference. Each northern BC community is entitled to Community Funds to devote to educational activities. The Tumbler Ridge physicians decided to use all of their reverted funds to create this regional conference of benefit to all, which physician groups in Fort St John, Dawson Creek, Valemount, McBride and Northern Health then generously supported, aided by a much appreciated donation from Conuma Coal.

Physician throwing a tree off the trail.

Resident physician from Fort St. John, BC Vikrant Grewal throwing a tree off the trail as the team worked to “give back” to the community of Tumbler Ridge.

Secondly, the palaeo theme reigned supreme, with the welcome supper served amid dinosaur attractions that are available nowhere else in BC. The Dinosaur Discovery Gallery was in ‘idling mode’ due to lack of funding, but Dr. McCrea, Dr. Buckley, and staff, all of whom had recently had their positions terminated due to the Museum funding situation, came in and conducted participants though four stations: the gallery, collections, preparation lab, and photogrammetry lab. Field trips followed to a dinosaur footprint site, a birding excursion, and a hike to the end of the magnificent Titanic Rock (expertly guided by the president of the local hiking club).

Thirdly, ‘payback’ for medical residents involved a team of ten working on the hiking trails immediately after the conference, chain-sawing deadfall and throwing it off the trail, thus contributing to the comfort of visitors and tourists to Tumbler Ridge.

Draws were held for spots on three jet-boats for tours to Kinuseo Falls, and the lucky winners had the privilege of seeing this great waterfall in full spate. Add in live violin music, a live band, a local comedian (the famous ‘Aunt Lizzie’), morning fitness runs, Float Fit and Tabatha classes in the pool, and all-in-all a unique learning environment was created, cementing the reputation of Tumbler Ridge as a conference destination with a special ambience.

Southern African physicians have contributed enormously to rural health care in BC over the past decades, and two short slideshows featured different aspects of this part of the world: clinics in Zimbabwe and fossil human footprints in South Africa. However, perhaps the most unexpected part of the conference happened later, after the banquet. Dr. Tom Perry, gravely concerned about the funding challenges of the dinosaur museum (with $50,000 needed in order to re-open) worked the crowd. Within a quarter of an hour $19,000 had been pledged, helping the museum significantly towards its goal!

As for the kids, it was all about Dinosaur Camp! Recently employed museum staff Debbie Gainor and Tammy Pigeon provided them with an unforgettable experience through two mornings of dinosaur crafts, microscope demonstration of dinosaur bones and teeth, using scribe tools, tours of parts of the museum that the public doesn’t get to see, and the making and painting of plaster casts of dinosaur tracks which they were able to take home as keepsakes.

At the end of a memorable weekend, participant evaluation forms reflected the high satisfaction rate for the conference, along with a much-heard sentiment: Can we please do 3D again in 2019?

 

For further information please contact:
Heather Gummow (250)565-5814 or heather.gummow@northernhealth.ca
Dr. Charles Helm (250) 242-1101 or helm.c.w@gmail.com

Charles Helm

About Charles Helm

Charles Helm has been a family physician in Tumbler Ridge since 1992. He immigrated to Canada from South Africa in 1986. He is the author of seven books on the Tumbler Ridge area, two on the history of the northern Rockies, and one on dinosaurs for kids. He has been an active explorer in the Wolverine Nordic and Mountain Society, designing, building and maintaining hiking trails. His palaeontological interests, expressed through the Tumbler Ridge Museum Foundation, have led to numerous fossil discoveries and scientific articles. He was instrumental in the successful proposal that led to the creation of the Tumbler Ridge Global Geopark, the newest UNESCO site in western Canada. He and his wife Linda have two children, Daniel and Carina.

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Plug into Prince George: tapping into trail and friendship networks

boardwalk forest

Many trails around Prince George are accessible-including the Ancient Forest.

Running, walking, hiking, and biking have always been part of my life. When I moved to Prince George in the winter of 2005, I knew I needed to make friends with similar interests, so that spring, I took a “learn to trail run” class. Twelve years later, I’m still enjoying outdoor adventures with people I met in the class!

Over the years, our group has found many excellent trails in and around the city of Prince George to enjoy fresh air and exercise all year round. Often, our dogs accompany us so we make a rather large pack! We feel fortunate to live in a place with such accessible natural beauty.

For those who enjoy a nice stroll, brisk walk, or leisurely bike ride, you can find a list of accessible trails on the Prince George Tourism website. Many are fully accessible and suitable for those using wheelchairs or scooters, or for parents with children in strollers. Feeling ambitious? Complete the entire 11 km heritage river trail circuit for a trip through the city’s history. Ferguson Lake also has trails and docks so you can walk or canoe on site – it’s only 5 km from highway 97 & Chief Lake Road!

forest

Getting outside is a great way to unplug and recharge.

For more adventurous souls, there is the Cranbrook Hill Greenway and its connecting trails, Forest for the World, Otway Ski Centre, and Pidherny Trails. The trails are suitable for hiking, walking, running, or mountain biking – and they have great names like “Kitchen Sink” and “Espresso”. We have seen moose, bears, foxes, and an incredible variety of birds. Oh, yes, and wild blueberries, raspberries, and strawberries – hey, sometimes you need a snack when you’re out on the trail! Just be sure of what berry you are picking – if you don’t know, don’t eat it!

Feel like getting out of the city? How about a bike ride down Willow Cale Road to Buckhorn Lake for a picnic? It’s easy riding with minimal traffic. Want to venture a bit further? Check out the trails maintained by the Tabor Mountain Recreation Society – Dougherty Creek Mobility Trail is fully accessible!

kids posing by tree

Posing with Treebeard, the oldest tree in the ancient rain forest!

Want to make a day of it? Try a hike up Teapot Mountain or take a picnic down the highway to the Ancient Forest with its accessible boardwalk. I love taking my camera and photographing the interesting lichens, and mushrooms – and of course the obligatory shot of the kids standing by the oldest tree in the forest, Treebeard!

And just because the snow is long gone, don’t think these trails are only for summer use! Both Otway and Tabor Mountain have groomed cross-country ski trails in winter. Or break out the snowshoes on some of the connecting trails around the Greenway and Forest for the World. The area is just as beautiful in winter – and no bugs to bother you!

Where do you go to unplug and get active in your community? Do you have a favourite local trail? If you’re in Prince George, I hope to see you out this summer!


Last fall we asked our readers to share how they plug into their communities through the Great Northern Scavenger Hunt!  We received some amazing entries and information about how to get active and plug into communities all over northern BC. Check back for “Plug Into” posts featuring tips and suggestions from those submissions!

Heather Ouellette

About Heather Ouellette

Heather is a Registered Nurse currently working in Population Health as the Regional Nursing Lead, Healthy Schools. Past work experiences include Public Health and teaching nursing at UNBC and in a previous life in Edmonton, home care and acute care nursing. When not outside adventuring with her friends and dogs, she likes to play in her garden during summer and sew quilts and garments in winter.

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So Long Summer (But it’s not all that bad!)

Creek

The view along Kleanza Creek hiking trail near Terrace, B.C.

I have to admit. I’m a fall kind of guy. Sure, the dog days of summer are good, but growing up in Revelstoke, BC, I always looked forward to the mountains getting a fresh dusting of snow and the Kokanee spawning in the local creeks. Some of my fondest memories are hiking through the woods on a crisp fall morning with a couple friends.

I’m sure that many people living in northern British Columbia share a similar memory.

Now, I know this can be a busy time of year, school has started and there’s still a few projects around the house to finish up before winter gets here. However, why not spare some time to explore your local waking and hiking trails. The days are cooler and hints of color are starting to show in the trees. Salmon are spawning and there’s still abundant wildlife to be seen. Northern British Columbia has a lot of diversity and the outdoors can be spectacular this time of year.

Hiking may be a popular summertime activity, but there’s no reason why it can’t be enjoyed through the fall and into the early winter. Eventually hiking can become snowshoeing or cross-country skiing, but that’s another blog post.

However, there are some things to consider before heading out on your favorite trail.

  • Always let someone know where you’re going and when you expect to return.
  • Northern BC is bear country. Be bear aware, especially if you’re in an area where salmon are spawning.
  • Remember that the days are getting shorter this time of year. Make sure you take that into account when planning your hikes so you can be off the trail before it gets dark
  • Be prepared. While the days might still be warm and pleasant, nights are getting cooler. Pack some warm clothing, an emergency blanket, flashlight, signalling device and fire starter with you.
  • Hunting season is underway, be aware that hunters may be sharing the outdoors with you.
  • Take your camera or smartphone; this time of year can be great for photos.

One of my fondest memories from growing up in Revelstoke was watching the snowline on the mountains get lower and lower as fall waned and winter approached. When it was about halfway half way down the mountains, a few friends and I would go hiking and meet the snow. It became a fall ritual.

20160922-reg-hiking-1

This is an old picture from waaay back on one of those trips to reach the snow!!! Taken at Mt. Revelstoke National Park.

To be honest I still watch the snow creeping down the mountains here in Terrace. I still laugh at an old memory of a snowball fight that pitted my friends Richard and Ken against me and another friend on one of those hikes. What sticks out most from that day was Richard nailing Ken at point blank range with a snowball that was actually meant for Jim or I. But I guess you had to be there!

Go ahead, get out there and embrace fall in northern British Columbia. You just might create some wonderful new memories with your friends and family.

Northern Health is sponsoring a great way to get to know (or share!) your community’s healthy features – The Great Northern Scavenger Hunt! Answering clues gets you out in your community and a chance to win great prizes.

Reg Wulff

About Reg Wulff

Reg is a licensing officer with Northern Health and has his BA in Health Science. Previously, he worked as a Recreation Therapist with Mental Health and Addictions Services in Terrace as well as a Regional Tobacco Reduction Coordinator. Originally from Revelstoke, Reg enjoys the outdoor activities that Terrace offers, like mountain biking and fishing. Reg also likes playing hockey, working out, and creative writing. He is married and has two sons and believes strongly in a work/life balance as family time is important to him.

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