Healthy Living in the North

Creating Visual Narratives of Care and Cultural Safety with Lisa Boivin

Lisa Boivin and her art is pictured.

Lisa Boivin shown with some of her colourful and vibrant art.

Lisa Boivin, a member of Deninu Kue First Nation in the Northwest Territories, completed her Doctoral Studies at the Rehabilitation Sciences Institute within the University of Toronto’s Faculty of Medicine. Her upcoming workshop called Creating Visual Narratives of Care and Cultural Safety is coming to Prince George.

Lisa started drawing four years ago to help her get through her classes. During an interview with CBC’s Unreserved, Lisa remarked that her introduction to art isn’t as romantic as one would assume.

“There really is no long, romantic history of longing to learn how to paint – it was literally just hating what I was studying.”

After one of her professors expressed concern that her doodling was disruptive to the class, Lisa began to use digital painting apps on her computer – creating her signature style of using bright, vibrant colours on a black backdrop.

As a Sixties Scoop survivor, art soon became an even greater refuge for Lisa. The Sixties Scoop is a part of Canadian history when Indigenous children were taken from their families and adopted out to white families – some as far away as Europe.

As Lisa learned about colonialism, cultural displacement, and intergenerational trauma in the classroom, she was also reconnecting with her father and processing her own personal history. When it came time to submit an assignment, Lisa found that words were not sufficient to express what she had to say. Instead, Lisa asked if she could hand in an arts-based project. Feedback was positive from her professor. So, she continued using painting as a teaching tool.

Today, Lisa works as an arts-based health care educator. Using image-based storytelling (an Indigenous teaching style), Lisa educates current and future health care professionals on the obstacles that Indigenous patients face as they navigate the Canadian health care system.

Lisa’s presentation can be broken down into three sections:

  • The first section provides a personal account of Canada’s colonial history as it relates to the health outcomes of Lisa and her family.
  • The second and third sections include reflexive, arts-based exercises that use image-based story telling to explore nation building in the workplace and to create a visual narrative of the clinical and personal self.

The afternoon of learning will begin with a tour of the Two Rivers Gallery REDRESS exhibit, followed by a lunch for participants and Lisa’s three-section workshop.

Organized by the Health Arts Research Centre, with help from the National Collaborating Centre for Indigenous Health and Northern Health (NH), this free afternoon workshop takes place on Friday, October 4, 2019 from 12:00 pm to 4:00 pm at the Two Rivers Gallery. NH staff and physicians are welcome to register, but space is limited! Before registering, NH staff should discuss attending with their manager if this event takes place during regular work hours, or if coverage or travel would be required.

Shelby Petersen

About Shelby Petersen

Shelby is the Web Services Coordinator with Indigenous Health. Shelby has over five years of experience working in content development and digital marketing. After graduating with a degree in Political Science from UNBC, Shelby moved to Vancouver where she pursued a career in digital marketing. Most recently, Shelby was the Senior Content Developer and Project Manager with a digital advertising agency in Vancouver, British Columbia. Born and raised in Prince George, Shelby is thrilled to be back in the community and spending time outside enjoying everything that the North has to offer.

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One year later: the journey to create the UHNBC welcome sign and beyond

A picture of the welcome sign, which reads, "We welcome you to our traditional territory." The Lheidli T'enneh logo is in the bottom right. The image is of faceless-yet-friendly people, painted with bright, vibrant colours.

The Welcome Sign, first unveiled at UHNBC, recognizes and acknowledges that the hospital is on the traditional land of the Lheidli T’enneh, and welcomes people to it.

The winter of 2018 saw the unveiling of a special work of art that acknowledges the traditional territory of Lheidli T’enneh and welcomes Indigenous and non-Indigenous people to the University Hospital of Northern BC (UHNBC).

The vision for a welcome sign/art installation for UHNBC was born in 2015. UHNBC is located on Indian Reservation #1 (IR#1) and on the territory of the Lheidli T’enneh. So, it was decided that the sign should be an acknowledgement and welcoming to the Lheidli T’enneh territory, and that the sign would be in Carrier (the traditional language of the Lheidli T’enneh).

To begin this project, the PG and Area Aboriginal Health Improvement Committee (AHIC) created a sub-committee to lead and guide the project. With guidance from Lheidli T’enneh chief and council, the sub-committee began planning the steps to create an art installation that would be placed prominently in the hospital.

After a call for Indigenous artists was issued, Carla Joseph, a Métis artist, born in Prince George, with Cree roots in Green Lake, Saskatchewan, was selected to create the sign. Carla created the design with Darlene McIntosh and Mary Gouchie, two Lheidli T’enneh Elders.

“Painting the sign was a great opportunity for me,” says Carla. “I wanted to do a piece that represented community and family. [The people on the sign] have no faces to show that it can be anybody. Making time for each other is so very important. Being an artist, I know art can be healing and inspirational.”

The sign is intended to recognize and acknowledge Indigenous peoples in health care facilities and to acknowledge the traditional territory of the Lheidli T’enneh. It’s also an opportunity to offer a learning experience to non-Indigenous peoples entering the hospital.

The welcome sign was officially unveiled on February 23, 2018.

Over a year later, the sign has had a tremendous impact on patients and health care providers alike. Shortly after the unveiling, the PG and Area AHIC voted to purchase additional signs to be distributed in health care facilities across the city.

For patients who access multiple health care facilities in Prince George, the signs acknowledge Lheidli T’enneh territory, provide continuity, and prioritize cultural safety.

Here are some of the locations where you can find a welcome sign, along with community members’ thoughts about the impact they’ve had on each facility:

Positive Living North

“When I go to a location that has one of the welcome signs, I immediately feel more comfortable walking in as a stranger to provide presentations.” – Kyla Turner

The Welcome Sign hangs on a white wall that also features Northern BC locations written in an inter-linking pattern.

The Welcome Sign hangs at the BC Cancer Centre for the North.

BC Cancer Prince George Centre for the North

“The welcome sign helps to set the tone when you walk into the facility and shows that cultural safety is a priority. The sign also provides a sense of continuity of care as BC Cancer Centre is linked to the University Hospital of Northern BC, where the larger presentation of this artwork originates.” – Carolyn Jacob, practice leader, patient and family counselling, and Laura Nordin, Indigenous cancer care counsellor.

Aboriginal Housing Society

“The sign is a symbol of our relationship, acknowledging Lheidli T’enneh traditional territory, and that we are thankful as visitors that we can live in and do our work on Lheidli T’enneh territory.” – Christos Vardacostas

Two women are posing with the Welcome Sign.

Erin Anderlini and Maria Rossi pose with the welcome sign at Prince George Native Friendship Centre.

Prince George Native Friendship Centre

“This sign is very meaningful to us, as it represents our working relationship with Lheidli T’enneh, which, for me, has been fostered by being part of the AHIC.” – Erin Anderini

PG Divisions of Family Practice & Blue Pine Primary Health Care Clinic

“We have had many comments on how beautiful the ‘Welcome’ picture is. When I think of the meaning it brings to our clinic, the theme of beauty comes to mind. We are fortunate to walk on the land of the Lheidli T’enneh. The welcome is a reminder to be mindful and respectful of the people and land of this territory.” – Submitted as a group quote.

Foundry Prince George

“The sign speaks to the importance of holding, in the work that we do, the history of this community and honoring territory. It brings forward agendas that bring healing. There is also a continuity from the bigger sign in the hospital – and people recognize that.” – Toni Carlton

Shelby Petersen

About Shelby Petersen

Shelby is the Web Services Coordinator with Indigenous Health. Shelby has over five years of experience working in content development and digital marketing. After graduating with a degree in Political Science from UNBC, Shelby moved to Vancouver where she pursued a career in digital marketing. Most recently, Shelby was the Senior Content Developer and Project Manager with a digital advertising agency in Vancouver, British Columbia. Born and raised in Prince George, Shelby is thrilled to be back in the community and spending time outside enjoying everything that the North has to offer.

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Foodie Friday: Supporting culturally safe environments with traditional First Nations foods

As a member of the Aboriginal Health team at Northern Health, it’s really important to me to support culturally safe health care environments. When health care settings are inclusive of Indigenous cultures and traditions, they become more culturally safe for Indigenous people. That is why I was excited to learn how Northern Health staff are making traditional First Nations foods available to patients and residents!

Cook with Hugwiljum (fish soup)

Offering traditional First Nations foods in health care environments is an important step in creating an inclusive, welcoming, and culturally safe health system for Indigenous peoples.

In Hazelton, cooks Anita Lattie and Armin Wesley are excited to make traditional First Nations foods available to residents and patients at Wrinch Memorial Hospital. Both Armin and Anita are Gitxsan; Anita is from Gitanmaax and Armin is from Sik-E-Dakh.

“When patients and residents see foods they are familiar with, they enjoy it more,” said Anita about the response to the menu additions.

“I have been waiting for this,” said a resident about the Hugwiljum fish soup and bannock he was eating for lunch.

The process of adding new foods to the Northern Health menu repertoire involves putting the recipe in a consistent format, testing it with ten people, and then submitting it for approval and further testing. Support services coordinator Deana Hawkins explained to me that once the recipes are approved, they are added to the core menu across Northern Health so other sites can also serve them.

In the northwest, Mills Memorial Hospital, Terraceview Lodge, and Kitimat General Hospital now offer the Hugwiljum fish soup and bannock. Anita has just finished testing a salmon patty recipe to send for approval this week. “All the staff in the Wrinch Memorial kitchen are Aboriginal and it makes us feel good about our jobs to be able to do this,” said Armin. According to BC Stats, in Hazelton, 56.5% of the urban population is Aboriginal.

In Prince Rupert, dietitian Arlene Carlson works with Elders at the Gitmaxmak’ay Nisga’a Society and Friendship House to organize traditional feasts twice a year for residents of Acropolis Manor, the local long term care facility. The feasts include locally prepared, seasonal foods such as fish chowder, moose soup, and kelp on roe. Local First Nations cultural entertainment is a highlight of the feasts. “These feasts are really popular with First Nations and non-First Nations residents alike,” said Arlene. This work has helped create a policy within our organization of bringing in food for social functions and cultural events. Other policies are in place to support families to bring in food for their loved ones in long term care.

On Haida Gwaii, traditional foods are offered in both hospitals. In the south, the Haida Gwaii Hospital and Health Centre – Xaayda Gwaay Ngaaysdll Naay serves local fish regularly on the menu and the Meals on Wheels program brings traditional food to Elders in the hospital on a weekly basis. In Masset, Northern Haida Gwaii Hospital & Health Centre residents are offered a special occasion meal once per month. Meals feature local and traditional ingredients such as fish, clams, deer, and locally grown vegetables. On Haida Gwaii, Shelly Crack and Tessie Harris are part of a national movement to incorporate sustainable food into the health care system; including more traditional foods.

Cultural safety is a priority for Northern Health. In July 2015, all BC Health Authority CEOs signed a declaration demonstrating their commitment to advancing cultural humility and cultural safety with their organizations. The goal of cultural safety is for all people to feel respected and safe when they interact with the health system. Culturally safe health services are free of racism and discrimination. People are supported to draw strengths from their identity, culture, and community. One of the features of a culturally safe health system is ensuring physical environments reflect local Indigenous communities and cultures.

Offering traditional First Nations foods in health care environments is an important step in creating an inclusive, welcoming and culturally safe health system for Indigenous peoples.

Hugwiljum (fish soup)

Makes 4-5 portions

Ingredients

  • 2 cups potatoes
  • 1 medium onion (diced)
  • 3 salmon loins
  • 1 tbsp curry
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 litre water

Instructions

  1. Bring all ingredients to boil. Reduce heat and simmer until potatoes are tender and salmon cooked.

 

Victoria Carter

About Victoria Carter

Victoria works in Northern Health's Aboriginal health program as the lead for engagement and integration. She is an adopted member of the Nisga’a nation and was given the name “Nox Aama Goot” which means “mother of good heart.” In her work she sees herself as an ally working together with Aboriginal people across the north to improve access to quality health care. She keeps herself well by honouring the mental, emotional, physical and spiritual aspects of her life through spending time with her friends and family, being in nature and working on her own personal growth.

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Orange Shirt Day

Two women dressed in orange

Marking Orange Shirt Day in Kitsumkalum.

I was honoured to be invited to Kitsumkalum’s Orange Shirt Day by Charlene Webb, the community health director. Although I got to wear a beautiful locally designed orange shirt, enjoy yummy orange food, and visit with many people, this event has a sad undertone.

What is Orange Shirt Day?

September 29th is Orange Shirt Day – a day of remembrance and recognition of residential school survivors and those who did not survive.

It is a day each year to acknowledge the harm done by the residential school system to children’s self-esteem and well-being and to remember that every child matters. Orange Shirt Day grew out of Phyllis’ story. In 1973, when she was 6 years old, Phyllis attended the Mission school. On her first day of school, her clothes (including a special, brand new, shiny orange shirt) were taken from her and replaced with a uniform. Orange Shirt Day is an annual opportunity to engage in a discussion on all aspects of the residential school system.

Residential schools

September is when children go back to school and it is therefore timely to remember the Indigenous children in Canada who were taken from their families and travelled long distances to attend residential schools. Instead of being nurtured and supported, many suffered emotional, physical, and sexual abuse there.

Residential schools are a dark part of Canadian history that make me very sad. As a 6th generation Canadian white woman with First Nations children, I have struggled with this part of Canada’s history. I first learned about residential schools when I was pregnant with my first child. I was devastated that such a thing could happen. As a parent, I cannot imagine a more heart wrenching and devastating experience than having my children forcibly removed and taken far away where I cannot protect them or care for them.

Woman wearing "Every Child Matters" shirt

Orange Shirt Day is a day each year to acknowledge the harm done by the residential school system to children’s self-esteem and well-being and to remember that every child matters.

Learning more

As hard as it is, we need to acknowledge that this tragedy occurred and learn more about it so that it never happens again. I encourage you to explore several resources:

Cultural humility

Part of healing from this difficult history in Canada involves all of us developing our cultural humility – our ability to be respectful, self-aware, and lifelong learners when it comes to the experiences of others.

I encourage you to join me and participate in the First Nations Health Authority social media campaign to engage all of us in advancing cultural safety and humility in the health system. In my daily life, I strive to do my part to help create an environment in Northern Health where people feel safe from racism and discrimination. Make a pledge today and share it on social media. Together we can make a difference.

Victoria Carter

About Victoria Carter

Victoria works in Northern Health's Aboriginal health program as the lead for engagement and integration. She is an adopted member of the Nisga’a nation and was given the name “Nox Aama Goot” which means “mother of good heart.” In her work she sees herself as an ally working together with Aboriginal people across the north to improve access to quality health care. She keeps herself well by honouring the mental, emotional, physical and spiritual aspects of her life through spending time with her friends and family, being in nature and working on her own personal growth.

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