Healthy Living in the North

Dietitian pro-tips: The 4th edition

A child and an adult man stirring food in a bowl together.

2019 has been a big year for dietitians, with the release of the new Canada’s Food Guide; we recently shared what Northern Health dietitians had to say about this new and improved guide.

During this Nutrition Month, the blog has featured the work of a few local dietitians, including Amelia and Allie. Others have been sharing their knowledge about food and nutrition.

For the last few years, on Dietitians Day, our amazing team has shared tips on food, nutrition, and healthy eating in a “pro-tips” blog post. This year, we are doing it again, but with a twist! Part of eating is done with our eyes, so why not share photos that bring our tips to life? “See” what our dietitian team members have to say!

Lise Luppens (Terrace)

Cook together with family or friends! Even toddlers and preschoolers can get involved. Learn more about building healthy relationships in the kitchen.

A jar of overnight oats.

Hannah Zmudzinski (Dietetic Student)

Mornings can be hectic! Planning meals ahead of time can help simplify your day. Try making breakfast the night before with these delicious overnight oats:

Ingredients:

  • 1/3 cup quick oats
  • 1 tbsp chia seeds
  • Pinch of cinnamon
  • 4-5 mint leaves, chopped
  • 1 cup chocolate soy beverage or milk
  • Top with fresh or frozen berries

Instructions:

  • Mix contents into container and chill in fridge overnight.
  • Next day, you can enjoy the oats at home, or wherever your morning takes you!
A woman holding a glass of green onions regrowing in water.

Hannah Wilkie (Fort St. John)

Re-grow veggies from veggie scraps! For example, you can re-use the bottoms of green onions by placing the roots in a glass with a small amount of water. Watch them re-grow before your eyes. Just be sure to change the water frequently!

 

Two children sitting on the counter with muffin tins.

 

Dena Ferretti (Terrace)

Dietitians also have picky eaters; even when both parents are dietitians! Shocking, I know. In our house both our children have very different palettes. My daughter loves black olive pizza and my son loves Thai sweet and spicy sauce with his rice. What helps us navigate the waters of “I don’t like that” or “I won’t eat that” is involving them in cooking. Remember, food is completely new to children and it may take 20 or more exposures to a new food before they adopt it. Those exposures can include something as simple as seeing the food, touching the food or smelling the food – we haven’t even begun to talk about bringing that food to their mouth. Be patient and try to have fun with your children around food.

Apple slices with peanut butter on one of them.

Robyn Turner (Vanderhoof)

Healthy eating doesn’t need to be complicated. Pair simple foods from two or three food groups from Canada’s Food Guide to make fast, portable, and tasty snacks. One of my favourites is a classic: apple with peanut butter!

 

A hand holding a button that says Dieting with a line through it.

 

Flo Sheppard (Terrace)

Ditch dieting. Instead, build a healthy relationship with food and your body. Feed yourself faithfully with foods you enjoy and that make you feel good. Listen to your body to know what and how much to eat to feel satisfied. Take care of, and appreciate, your body for all it can do.

A woman holding a pot of ingredients to make tortillas.

Emilia Moulechkova (Terrace)

A playful approach to food can go a long way to support healthy eating. Build variety into your diet by trying a new food, recipe, or method of cooking. Here I am on my 30th birthday having fun making homemade corn tortilla for the very first time. We served them family style and let everyone choose from a variety of toppings such as lettuce, onions, red pepper, refried beans, ground beef, and salsa. Yum!

 

People enjoying a workplace potluck.

Laurel Burton (Prince George)

Healthy eating is much more than food and nutrients; it’s also about fostering social connection and creating a sense of community. Looking for more ways to eat with others? Take a cooking class with a loved one, or plan a monthly dinner date with friends. At my workplace we try to come together every few months to share food. After all, nothing invites variety quite like a potluck!

Looking for more RD tips? Check out our previous posts!

Nutrition Month Eating Together contest

During Nutrition Month throughout March, we want to see how you eat together! Organize a date to eat together, show us, and be entered to win an Instant Pot! This could mean grabbing a coffee and scone with a colleague, organizing a lunch date with a friend, having a potluck with family – whatever this means to you! Set a date, eat together, and show us to win! See our Eating Together contest page for complete details.

Laurel Burton

About Laurel Burton

Laurel Burton is part of Northern Health’s team of population health dietitians, and is the food security lead for the vast region that comprises northern BC. Laurel is a big proponent of taking a multi-dimensional approach to health. Her work focuses on the social determinants of health and how they affect overall well-being, both at the individual and population level. Laurel has supported food security work in a variety of geographical regions, and has worked with groups across the lifecycle, within BC, and internationally, to support community and regional food systems development, for the aim of optimizing health. In her spare time, Laurel loves a good book, a hike in the woods with friends, or spending time at home baking sourdough bread, surrounded by her many, many houseplants.

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Celebrating the work of dietitians in the north: Dietitians Day 2018

Did you know that March 14th is National Dietitians Day in Canada? On this day, we celebrate registered dietitians (RDs) as healthcare professionals who support health through food and nutrition. It’s an opportunity to pause and reflect on the contributions of the approximately 35 passionate, knowledgeable, and dedicated RDs that work all throughout Northern Health. In particular, I started to think about those dietitians that have served in the north for many years and how things have changed over the years.

Linda’s story

 I first met Linda McMynn in the fall of 1996. She interviewed (and subsequently hired) me via videoconference for a job at Mills Memorial Hospital in Terrace. It was my first experience with videoconference, a very new technology at the time. Linda’s willingness and courage to use this brand new technology really speaks to her openness to seek out new challenges. Linda was the first dietitian to work in Terrace, moving here in the 1970s:

I got to write my own job description and develop the job the way I wanted. I felt very isolated in the beginning, but the job turned out to be a huge opportunity. I was able to explore and work in many areas of the profession that I wouldn’t have if I’d stayed in Vancouver.”

Working in the north helped shape Linda’s preferences and career path. She says that during her training, she enjoyed clinical work, but intensely disliked food service and administrative dietetics. However, in the past two decades with Northern Health, Linda has immersed herself in the food service world. She pioneered the development of high quality food service practices and policies that have improved food service in all Northern Health facilities.

Two dietitians cooking pasta together.

Left: Linda McMynn and Right: Flo Sheppard; circa 2010 in Smithers at a Northwest Dietitian gathering, making pasta.

When I asked Linda what she believed to be at the core of her work as a dietitian, she was quick to say ‘food first’:

The best way to ensure good nutrition is by preparing, eating, and enjoying good food  . . . ideally with others.”

Certainly, I recall her efforts to make this real for the residents of Terraceview Lodge, a residential living facility in Terrace. I’ve always been struck by how deeply Linda cares about the people she serves. Certainly, many dietitians, including myself, prefer to be working behind the scenes to make things better, like Linda.

Wendy’s story

 Wendy Marion-Orienti is a dietitian based out of Smithers. Like most northern dietitians, she is a generalist, working across the spectrum of care: health promotion and prevention, treatment, and long-term care. She is best known for her expertise in person-centred care, especially with clients with diabetes and disordered eating. When I first met Wendy in 1996, I was struck by her passion for food and her focus on providing whole-person care.

Two dietitians standing together on rock over looking valley near Smithers, BC.

Left: Wendy Marion-Orienti and Right: Shelly Crack; taken near Smithers circa 2010.

Wendy didn’t start out wanting to be a dietitian. Initially she was enrolled in a degree in interior design at the University of Saskatchewan. The program had set courses for the first two years. While taking a required nutrition course, she was struck by the professor’s impassioned description of nutrition and its ability to make a profound difference at the local, national, and global level. It was this discovery that motivated Wendy to switch career paths. Her upbringing on a mixed farm in Saskatchewan, where “we ate what we grew and very few foods were purchased (sometimes macaroni)” is what “planted [her] in nutrition,” so this switch to a career as a dietitian was an easy one.

When asked what she loves most about her work, Wendy said:

I feel privileged to have the opportunity to build meaningful relationships with clients, families, colleagues, and community . . . to walk with them, and to support them in making informed choices about their health.”

 I, along with many other dietitian colleagues, have been on the receiving end of Wendy’s warm and nurturing support and friendship.

Reflections of nutrition: then and now

Collectively, Linda and Wendy have offered almost 100 years of quality service to northern BC.  When asked about changes in the nutrition landscape, both of them reflected on how the field of nutrition has continued to grow.

Linda noted that there has been a growth in the interest in food and nutrition:

When I first started working as a dietitian, nutrition was not a frequent topic of discussion in the media. I don’t remember there being the prevalence of food fads, supplements, and diets being promoted. There wasn’t much interest in where our food comes from. Now there is so much more interest in all aspects of food.”

 Wendy agreed. She reflected that, throughout the years, there are cycles of food fads – the “miracle” food was once broccoli, then kale, cauliflower, and coconut, to name a few. In truth, there are no magic foods, rather the wisdom of variety and balance prevail.

Wendy also appreciates the ever-expanding variety of foods that can be enjoyed. She remembers when yogurt and granola were rare, found only in health food stores. Now, an increasing number of people enjoy diverse eating patterns that incorporate foods from a variety of cultures and those locally grown or produced. Wendy incorporates influences from Korea, China, and Thailand into her cooking, as a result of travel to these countries. However, she occasionally enjoys a traditional meal of roast beef, Yorkshire pudding, potatoes, and fresh greens from the garden, which is a meal from her youth. Although the foods we eat and our understanding of healthy eating has grown over time, the basic understanding that food means more than nutrients, is key. Food celebrates who we are and where we come from.

This year’s Dietitians Day, I’d like to honour the RDs that have come before me, those I work with now, and those who will come next. I feel honoured to share in the work that dietitians do. RDs have a strong scientific knowledge base, and promote person-centered health, not only through food and nutrition, but also through their passion, commitment, and advocacy for the health and wellness of the communities they serve.

Do you have a story about how a dietitian has made a difference for you?  If so, we’d love to hear about it. Happy Dietitians Day!

Flo Sheppard

About Flo Sheppard

Flo has worked in northern BC for over 20 years in a variety of roles. Currently, she is the Chief Population Health Dietitian and Team Lead for the Population Health Nutrition Team. She takes a realistic, supportive, and non-judgemental approach to healthy eating in recognition that there are many things that influence how we care for ourselves. In her spare time, you are likely to find Flo cooking, reading, volunteering, or enjoying the outdoors.

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2nd annual Dietitians Day pro tips!

Group photo

Northern Health dietitians from Haida Gwaii to Fort St. John gather together!

With Nutrition Month in full swing, it’s time to celebrate the people who bring credible, evidence-based nutrition information to the public: today is Dietitians Day!

Registered dietitians (RDs) are university-trained food and nutrition experts who work in a variety of settings like health care, the community, with business, and in private practice. We translate scientific research into practical solutions for individuals, families, and communities. We love to share our tips on healthy eating while celebrating the social and cultural roles that food plays in our lives!

Did you know that registered dietitians are the only regulated nutrition professionals in British Columbia? This means we are accountable to our regulatory college (College of Dietitians of BC), where we are required to follow professional codes of conduct and ensure our training is kept up to date. The regulatory college is there to protect the public and is your point of contact if you have questions or concerns around an RD’s conduct.

In what is quickly becoming a yearly tradition for Dietitians Day at Northern Health, I’ve once again reached out to my fellow Northern Health dietitians (and a few of our dietetic interns) to share their “Pro Tips” for Nutrition Month. Check them out below and if you are hungry for more, be sure to follow Northern Health on Twitter for nutrition information all month long. Happy Dietitians Day!

What’s your Dietitians Day pro tip?

  • Emilia (Terrace): Enjoy family meals often. People who eat together, eat better!
  • Kelly (dietetic intern, Prince George): Try roasting your veggies. It’s an easy way to bring out their natural sweetness!
  • Lise (Terrace): Jazz up your water! Try cucumber, berries, or mint. Kids can help too!
  • Emilia (Terrace): Make your own take-out. Try pizza or taco night & let everyone pick their own veggie toppings!
  • Marianne (Prince George): Be passionate about food. Grow, cook, or taste something new!
  • Flo (Terrace): Diets don’t work. Eat & enjoy a variety of foods for health & pleasure.
  • Laurel (dietetic intern, Terrace): All foods fit! Eat for your physical, mental, and spiritual health.
  • Tamara (Prince George): Get the kids involved. Let them choose a new recipe & make it together.
  • Olivia (Prince George): Bored with plain water? Try flavoured herbal teas – they are good hot or cold!
  • Flo (Terrace): Behaviour determines health, not weight. Eat intuitively, move joyfully & love your body today.
  • Darcie (Prince George): Dietitians are passionate about food & nutrition! We help translate nutrition science for everyday life.
  • Marianne (Prince George): Enjoy regular meals & snacks. Feed yourself – provide, don’t deprive!

Looking for more information on registered dietitians? Check out Dietitians of Canada.

Marianne Bloudoff

About Marianne Bloudoff

Born and raised in BC, Marianne moved from Vancouver to Prince George in January 2014. She is a Registered Dietitian with Northern Health's population health team. Her passion for food and nutrition lured her away from her previous career in Fisheries Management. Now, instead of counting fish, she finds herself educating people on their health benefits. In her spare time, Marianne can be found experimenting in the kitchen and writing about it on her food blog, as well as exploring everything northern B.C. has to offer.

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