Healthy Living in the North

Foodie Friday: sharing a meal with others – a true holiday gift

Season’s Eatings! With the holidays just around the corner, I start to grow homesick for my home on the East Coast. I often catch myself daydreaming about my family’s long dining room table with the bright red tablecloth and the people I love gathered around it. More than just a big Christmas dinner and devouring turkey with all the fixings takes place there – a lot of important family traditions happen around that dining room table. It’s those traditions that mean the most to me. I’m grateful for my family and that I’m able to spend the holiday season with them. Not every family or every year will be the same. Sometimes people celebrate with chosen family, with friends or coworkers, or choose to take time alone and reflect on the passing year.

The benefits of preparing and sharing a meal with others are a true holiday gift.

When we think about eating during the holidays, it’s easy to dwell on the large portions, decadent options, and seemingly endless buffets. I encourage you to take holiday eats off the “naughty list,” listen to your body, and take the time to enjoy each morsel. The benefits of preparing and sharing a meal with others are a true holiday gift. For all the years I worried about the contents of the holiday meals or spent my time anxiously trying to make the perfect dish, I barely remember a single meal I ate in great detail. What does last, for me, are the memories, traditions, and the sense of family around that long red table.

One thing that’s always on the table is my mom’s homemade cranberry sauce. She makes it every year to share with family and neighbours and I want to share the recipe with you!

Cranberry Orange Sauce

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1 cup orange juice
  • Zest of one orange
  • 1 12-ounce pack fresh cranberries

Instructions:

  1. Combine juice and sugar to a saucepan and heat until dissolved.
  2. Add cranberries and zest, simmer for 10 minutes, until all berries burst. Stir occasionally.
  3. Cover and cool completely.
Amelia Gallant

About Amelia Gallant

Amelia is a Primary Care Dietitian living and working in Fort St. John. Born and raised near St. John's, Newfoundland, she made her cross-country journey to northern BC in 2017 and is delighted to see comforts of home in the kindness of the people she meets and their love of the outdoors - even in the long and snowy winters. Forever a foodie, Amelia's the one at your dinner table trying to snap the perfect picture, or trying to replicate the latest food trends in her kitchen. As a dietitian, she hopes to simplify the mixed nutrition messaging and help people re-learn to enjoy their eating experience while supporting their healthy living goals.

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Foodie Friday: Tried and true family recipes

Recipe card for salmon loaf

Marianne’s mom’s well-used recipe card is a copy of her own mother’s recipe. What tried and true recipes have your family passed down?

I am an avid cookbook collector. It all started when I was 12 and my parents gave me a cream cheese cookbook for Christmas and it just kept growing from there! My culinary library has expanded to include pretty much any cuisine, cooking technique, or food you can think of. And while I love to experiment with these recipes, I still have a special place in my heart for those tried and true family recipes handed down to me from my parents and grandparents.

I have many fond memories that involve food and family. Memories like spending afternoons stuffing and folding perogies with Grandma and Grandpa Bloudoff in their little East Vancouver kitchen, enjoying them for lunch along with my grandpa’s Doukhobor borscht, then taking home bags of those perogies and jars full of soup. Or all the canning and preserves that my mom, my uncle, and my grandpa would make – peaches, apricots, and cherries from the Okanagan, green beans grown in my uncle’s garden, and the best sweet pickle mix you have ever tasted. And I can’t forget all of the side dishes that make it into every family holiday meal!

I’m grateful for all of the recipes and cooking skills that were passed on to me. Sharing food traditions is a huge part of forming connections with family, friends, and culture. It’s also an important part of healthy eating and having a healthy relationship with food. It’s something that I draw from not only in my own personal life, but also as a dietitian.

One of my favourite family recipes comes from my mom’s mom – salmon loaf. When my mom was a kid, they would make salmon loaf from salmon that my grandpa had caught and canned himself. I now make it with canned salmon from the store because I am no fisherwoman. It makes a great, easy weeknight meal paired with some steamed rice and your favourite vegetables. Try it out instead of meatloaf one night – it might just become a new family tradition for you, too.

Salmon loaf on a plate

Try Marianne’s family’s tried and true salmon loaf recipe with some rice and veggies for an easy and delicious weeknight meal!

Salmon Loaf

Serves 4 – 6

Ingredients

  • 2 cans (213 g) salmon (sockeye, pink, or other)
  • 6 – 7 soda crackers, crumbled
  • 1 tsp lemon juice
  • 3 tbsp milk
  • 1 tbsp melted butter
  • pepper to taste
  • 2 eggs

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees F.
  2. Mix all ingredients, except eggs.
  3. Beat eggs until fluffy, then fold into mixture.
  4. Spread mixture into small loaf pan.
  5. Bake for 45 minutes, or until golden and crispy on top.

Tip: Canned sockeye salmon is great in this recipe, but can be expensive. Choose canned pink salmon for a more budget-friendly – but equally delicious – version.

Tip: Add fresh or dried herbs like dill, parsley, or basil, or some chopped green onion to change up the flavour.

Marianne Bloudoff

About Marianne Bloudoff

Born and raised in BC, Marianne moved from Vancouver to Prince George in January 2014. She is a Registered Dietitian with Northern Health's population health team. Her passion for food and nutrition lured her away from her previous career in Fisheries Management. Now, instead of counting fish, she finds herself educating people on their health benefits. In her spare time, Marianne can be found experimenting in the kitchen and writing about it on her food blog, as well as exploring everything northern B.C. has to offer.

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