Healthy Living in the North

First Nations communities explore and celebrate cultural models of mental wellness

When I heard the Terrace, Kitimat and Area Indigenous Health Improvement Committee (IHIC)-previously known as the Aboriginal Health Improvement Committee (AHIC)- members were coming together to share examples of how their communities had embraced culture as a means of improving mental wellness, I was excited. Who wouldn’t want to be part of a cultural experience that shows off community strengths and traditional values? I knew this was going to be a memorable event for myself and all who attended – and guess what? I was not let down!

Indigenous gathering at Kitselas

Over 60 people from First Nations communities in the Northwest, came together to share how their communities had embraced culture as a means of improving mental wellness.

On June 8th, 2017, Kitselas First Nation hosted a “Celebration of Successes” event showcasing three First Nations community projects that explore mental wellness from a community and cultural perspective.

Coming together

Over 60 people from Kitselas, the Terrace/Kitimat and Area Indigenous Health Improvement Committee (IHIC), and its member communities, attended the celebration in Kulspai. The event started off with a welcome to the Tsimshian territory from elder Edward Innes and a welcome from former councillor Lynn Wright-Parker. Jennifer Brady-Giles, the Kitselas Home and Community Health Nurse facilitated the day.

Indigenous people conducting a welcome.

The event started off with a welcome to the Tsimshian territory.

Jonathan Cooper, the Northern Health Kitimat Health Services Administrator and Terrace/Kitimat and Area IHIC Chair, and I, Victoria Carter, Northern Health Lead for Engagement and Integration with Indigenous Health, gave an overview of the IHIC and its work. Communities shared their projects and attendees were even entertained by the Kitselas drummers, who performed some songs and a wonderful lunch was served that all participants shared in!

Curious about what community projects were shared? The projects came from the Kitselas First Nation, Nisga’a Valley Health Authority, and the Gitxsan West communities. Here’s what they did:

Kitselas First Nation

Kitselas showcased their youth wellness video which highlighted the current youth activities in Kitselas and their future vision.

 

Nisga’a Valley Health Authority

The Nisga’a Valley Health Authority showcased their family conference which focuses on integrating culture into health and wellness services by incorporating traditional teachings and events.

Gitxsan West

Gitxsan West communities showcased their project of reigniting Gitxsan culture within mental health.  In this project, knowledge holders from the communities came together to identify and document Gitxsan traditional mental wellness and will begin to strategize how best to reignite these practices.

Sharing success

Traditional knowledge holders met to share and to strategize how this information will be used.  Many at the celebration spoke up to praise the projects, to share their own stories, to show support of the initiatives, and to offer words of encouragement for these innovative approaches to wellness. Appreciation in the room grew as ideas of cultural renewal and its healing power were shared.

Sponsorship of the event and projects were supplied by the Terrace/Kitimat and Area IHIC. Curious what an Indigenous Health Improvement Committee (IHIC)/Aboriginal Health Improvement Committee (AHIC) is? There are eight AHICs/IHICs across the north made up of leads from Indigenous communities, Northern Health, the First Nations Health Authority, and other sectors. AHICs/IHICs identify health challenges facing Indigenous people in the area and work collaboratively towards solutions.

At this event, Kitselas, Nisga’a Valley Health Authority, and the Gitxsan West communities shared their projects and how they have benefited their communities.  It was a great opportunity to learn about how the Terrace/Kitimat and Area IHIC, and health leads from Indigenous communities and groups like Northern Health and the First Nations Health Authority, are collaborating to address community needs and suggestions in innovative ways.

Thanks go to Kitselas for hosting this amazing event!

Victoria Carter

About Victoria Carter

Victoria works in Northern Health's Aboriginal health program as the lead for engagement and integration. She is an adopted member of the Nisga’a nation and was given the name “Nox Aama Goot” which means “mother of good heart.” In her work she sees herself as an ally working together with Aboriginal people across the north to improve access to quality health care. She keeps herself well by honouring the mental, emotional, physical and spiritual aspects of her life through spending time with her friends and family, being in nature and working on her own personal growth.

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A Healthier You (November 2014)

A Healthier You; magazine; youth

A Healthier You (November 2014)

Where does the time go?! We are already at our 12th edition of A Healthier You! Brought to you by Northern Health and Glacier Media, the magazine is produced four times a year. Articles are written by northerners for northerners and cover a broad range of topics.

Have you ever thought that today’s youth are unengaged or less healthy? Well, this issue proves you wrong! All around northern B.C., youth are engaged and taking on great tasks to make their communities healthier places to live. For example, check out Myles Matilla’s great work promoting youth mental wellness and mindcheck.ca. We also highlight ways to get kids engaged in their personal health and wellness, including healthy meal preparation, physical activity, and more!

In addition to the Northern Health and Prince George Citizen staff, we want to thank the YMCA of Northern BC, First Nations Health Authority, and the Dr. REM Lee Hospital Foundation for their contributions to this edition.

Read the magazine today!

Chelan Zirul

About Chelan Zirul

Chelan Zirul is the Regional Manager for Health Promotions and Community Engagement for Northern Health. As a graduate from UNBC, she did her Master's of Arts in Natural Resources and Environmental Studies. She explored regional development decision-making and is an advocate for policy that is appropriate for the needs of northerners. This, combined with her personal interest in health and wellness, drew her to work in health communications. Born in northern B.C., she takes advantage of the access to outdoor living. She enjoys hunting and exploring the backcountry with her dog and husband and enjoys finding ways to use local foods.

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