Healthy Living in the North

Our People: Spotlight on Kyle Smith, Audiologist, Fort St. John

Kyle standing on a riverbank.

Kyle Smith, Audiologist in Fort St. John.

For Kyle Smith, it was his interest in language and communication that led him to a career in audiology. Growing up off the grid, he developed a love for the outdoors which made his move to Fort St. John with his fiancée a great fit! Before choosing audiology as a career, he completed a culinary degree and was a tree planter and self-professed “ski bum” before he decided to go back to school for creative writing. This ultimately led him to audiology.

May is Speech and Hearing Month, so I spoke with Kyle to learn a little more about him and what it’s like working as an audiologist!

In your own words, what does an audiologist do?

Audiology is a big field! It involves communication and hearing health, as well as balance. It includes what you might typically picture an audiologist doing — things like hearing tests and helping people with hearing devices. But it also includes things you might not picture, like occupational noise testing: walking around with a sound level meter and determining whether there’s a dangerous amount of sound or not. I’m part of a community health team in Fort St. John. Along with hearing tests, I also help little kids learn to use their ears. That could mean teaching families about communication strategies, or using hearing aids, or helping make homes and schools hearing-friendly places. Basically, I work on the hearing or input side of speech and language development.

Audiologists also help adults with balance disorders — these can be complicated to test! There’s a complex interaction between our inner ear, eyes, and the mechanical receptors in our feet and leg muscles. They work as a team to tell us if we’re standing upright or not. When these aren’t in balance with each other, people can get queasy and lose their balance.

Can you tell me about your career so far?

I’m pretty new to my role. I started in October 2018. Since I started school six years ago, the field has already changed in huge ways. There are little computers in hearing aids themselves. If you think about the advances in smart phones and cameras and how far that technology has come — hearing aids are similar. You can get hearing aids that are controlled by apps. From what I understand, the next generation may even connect to the internet!

How are speech and hearing related?

They’re very connected — basically they’re two sides of the same coin. We don’t learn speech on our own. Hearing our guardians’ voices as babies, we eventually make sense of the “blurbs” they’re saying as syllables and words and then sentences. We need practice to get good at it. It’s the turn taking and the conversation when we’re communicating that counts towards learning language. If someone isn’t getting input, they won’t understand that sounds have meaning and are connected to people moving their faces around. There are little cues — for example if someone is missing their “f’s” and “s’s,” that may indicate hearing loss, as in they may not have ever heard the sound to know it.

What kind of education is needed to be an audiologist?

In Canada, you need a master’s degree. I did a Master of Science in Audiology and Speech Sciences at the University of British Columbia. It takes a four year undergraduate degree and volunteer work to get in. The master’s program is about two to three years long — it depends if you do a thesis or go on to complete a doctorate afterwards. After school, you don’t stop learning! I’m going to a conference in May. Things are always changing and updating in the field, especially with the technology.

What does a regular day look like for you?

Every day looks a bit different which is one of the things I enjoy about my job! A lot of my day involves patient care. I mostly see kids aged nine months to 19. I try and determine what they can hear, and if they’re having difficulties, then I figure out where the break down is and how to fix it, so to speak. For some kids, I’m trying to figure out how they can hear better in the classroom or in daily life. I get to work with new and cool technology. There are some fun gadgets like bone conduction hearing aids; they vibrate the skull so that sound can be interpreted that way, rather than through the outer ear.

What’s your favourite or most rewarding part of your role?

I love those “Youtube moments” when a baby hears their parent’s voice for the first time. I also love being at the intersection of health care and cool new gadgets — I get to troubleshoot problems and fix things in real time which I enjoy. I also love helping kids access the sounds and conversation around them so they can keep up with their hearing peers. Hearing loss can really isolate us from people.

What sort of collaboration is there in the audiology field?

I’d like to give a shout out to the BC Early Hearing Program. They’re a global leader in the detection of hearing loss in newborns, with amazing follow through to coordinating medical or technological interventions when needed. In a recent national survey on early hearing detection and intervention, all the different provincial programs were ranked and BC was a shining star!

I work closely with the BC Early Hearing Program, mostly with kids aged nine months to five years. If they’ve had hearing loss, we work in tandem to coordinate services, whether that’s getting funding for devices or using a team approach to get a speech pathologist, or sign language instruction for deaf infants born to hearing parents, if they choose that route.

How are kids screened for hearing loss?

Just about every newborn baby is screened at birth. If there’s risk factors identified, then they’re followed up and checked on. When kids are school-aged, they do a Kindergarten screening and language assessment. There’s more information on the NH Hearing Program website.

How can someone see an audiologist?

Seeing a public health audiologist requires a referral. These can come from a variety of sources depending on the concerns and the community:

  • Registered nurses and allied health professionals
  • Doctors and medical specialists
  • Child development centres
  • Teachers of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing in the school districts

Learn more

Haylee Seiter

About Haylee Seiter

Haylee is a communications advisor for Public and Population Health. She grew up in Prince George and is proud to call Northern BC home. During university she found her passion for health promotions by volunteering with the Canadian Cancer Society and became interested in marketing through the UNBC JDC West team. When she's not dreaming up communications strategies, she can be found cycling with the Wheelin Warriors or spending time with family and friends. (NH Blog Admin)

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What brought you to the North? A Q & A with Shannon McRae, Nurse Practitioner

Shannon posing at UNBC.

Shannon at UNBC in Prince George for the Nurse Practitioner Face-to-Face Gathering in April 2018. “It was a great opportunity to connect with my colleagues from across the region,” she says.

Shannon McRae, a family Nurse Practitioner (NP), is a relatively new graduate, having been an NP for over a year. She works in Fort St. John in a private family practice with a team of physicians.

What do you like about being an NP?

I initially went to school to be a registered nurse, then worked in the emergency department for seven years. You don’t spend a lot of time there getting to know your patients — you treat the ailment that brought them in, then send them home. I wanted the opportunity to be more involved in the long-term care of patients.

As an NP, I get to spend more time with patients, getting to know them and helping keep them healthy. It lets you have an impact in their lives, and you feel like you’re improving the overall health of the community.

Shannon standing on a cliff above the river with a fishing pole.

Shannon fishing in the Besa River in Redfern-Keily Provincial Park, a remote area north of Fort St John that can only be reached on horseback or by using all-terrain vehicles.

What made you choose Fort St. John?

I’m from Fort St. John and I grew up here. I enjoy the size of the community and the type of lifestyle you have living here.

You have quick access to lots of outdoor activities including camping, hiking, cross-country skiing, and river boating. Our airport has multiple flight options so if you like to travel, you can easily get to your destination. Plus, my commute to work is only five minutes!

What do you like about working in Fort St. John?

I’m fortunate to work with a great group of health care providers!

Our physicians are really supportive, and they’re a great group of people. I enjoy working with our interprofessional team too – it’s a group of nurses, dietitians, social workers, and mental health professionals.

Tamara Reichert

About Tamara Reichert

Tamara is the communications advisor for the innovation and development commons at Northern Health where she works on a number of projects with the research, quality improvement, clinical simulation, and education teams. Born and raised in Prince George, Tamara grew up on a ranch where she rode horses, played with farm animals, built forts, and raided the family garden. She enjoys spending time travelling, hiking, cooking, reading, and cheering for her favourite sports teams.

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Fort St. John Hospital and other NH facilities win outstanding awards in lab services

The lab technologist team standing with the certificate awards.
Medical Lab Technologists Matthew Coburn, Laurel Coburn (related by marriage), and Carlee Bryson with Fort St. John Hospital’s three awards.

Congratulations to Fort St. John Hospital staff for recently receiving three outstanding achievement awards from the BC Provincial Blood Coordinating Office.

“The achievements are a testament to the donors of British Columbia, that our labs in Northern Health are great stewards, for their selfless act in helping others through their donation of blood products,” says Julius Valido, Quality Resource Technologist at the University Hospital of Northern BC (UHNBC) in Prince George.

The recognition is related to the hospital’s efficient usage of blood products, donor red cells, and IV immune globulin (IVIG).

“It is also a recognition that Northern Health is motivated to reduce the unnecessary cost to healthcare,” says Julius, “and to the public sector by diminishing inventory wastage and transportation of products to and from the suppliers and within lab sites.”

The three outstanding achievement awards are:

  • Award for Outstanding Achievement in 0% Red Cell Outdate Rate: The lab used all donor red cells before they expired. Red cells have an average shelf-life of 45 days.
  • Award for Outstanding 0% Expiry Rate of all Factor products: The lab used all blood products and derivatives, such as coagulation factors, before they expired.
  • Award for Outstanding 0% IVIG Discard and Outdate Rate: The lab used all IV immune globulin (IVIG) before its expiration date. IVIG is produced from healthy human blood to help fight infections for patients with a weakened immune system; and it’s very expensive, at $65 per gram. Some patients need 1000-2000 grams. The lab not only used the product before the expiration date, but it also handled it with care during shipping and receiving, and placed it in temperature controlled storage before being used for various approved conditions other than weakened immune systems.

Several other Northern Health facilities won awards and honourable mentions (see below). Keep an eye out for a full story in the upcoming Northern Way magazine. We’ll take an in-depth look at what these awards mean to Northern Health patients and how the lab teams achieved these amazing results.

Congratulations to everyone!

Honourable Mention for Achievement of a Red Cell Outdate Rate Below 1%

  • Prince Rupert Regional Hospital
  • University Hospital of Northern BC

Award for Outstanding 0% Expiry Rate of all Factor Products

  • Bulkley Valley District Hospital
  • Dawson Creek and District Hospital
  • Fort St. John Hospital
  • G.R. Baker Memorial Hospital
  • Mills Memorial Hospital
  • Prince Rupert Regional Hospital
  • University Hospital of Northern BC

Award for Outstanding 0% IVIG Discard and Outdate Rate

  • Bulkley Valley & District Hospital
  • Fort St. John Hospital
  • G.R. Baker Memorial Hospital
  • Haida Gwaii Hospital and Health Centre
  • Mills Memorial Hospital
  • Prince Rupert Regional Hospital
  • St. John Hospital
  • Stuart Lake Hospital
  • Wrinch Memorial Hospital
Brandan Spyker

About Brandan Spyker

Brandan works in digital communications at NH. He helps manage our staff Intranet but also creates graphics, monitors social media and shoots video for NH. Born and raised in Prince George, Brandan started out in TV broadcasting as a technical director before making the jump into healthcare. Outside of work he enjoys spending quality time and travelling with his wife, daughter and son. He’s a techie/nerd. He likes learning about all the new tech and he's a big Star Wars fan. He also enjoys watching and playing sports.

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Northern Health MRI Improvements: Rikki Furmanek

“We also are able to accommodate surrounding areas such as Fort Nelson, Chetwynd, Taylor – people don’t have to travel very far, especially in the wintertime, so that’s great.”

In this video, Rikki Furmanek, Northern Health X-ray Technician, mentions the benefits that a new MRI machine brings to her hometown, Fort St. John, and what it does for the Northeast!

You can also see how the MRI machine was installed, which includes a big lift through a window at the hospital.

Thanks to additional provincial investments in MRI services across the province, Northern Health is expected to increase the number of MRIs performed by 70% over last year, and an additional 102 MRI hours of operation have been added (between the Fort St. John, Prince George, and Terrace MRI locations).

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Northern Health MRI Improvements: Shyr Chui and Danita Braun

“Fifteen minutes later I got a call from the MRI booking office, and they told me they wanted me in the next day in the evening… and I was dumbfounded, because I was expecting it to be a 6 week wait for this appointment!”

In this video, we hear from patient Danita Braun, who was thrilled to hear the wait time of her MRI appointment was drastically cut down. Getting the MRI done sooner also meant a change in her care plan which she was thrilled to hear!

Also featured, Shyr Chui, Northern Health Radiologist, mentions how scanning hours have also changed, adding evening times and weekends!

Thanks to additional provincial investments in MRI services across the province, Northern Health is expected to increase the number of MRIs performed by 70% over last year, and an additional 102 MRI hours of operation have been added (between the Fort St. John, Prince George, and Terrace MRI locations).

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Northern Health MRI Improvements: Marina Downs and Margaret Kostyshyn

“This has increased patient happiness, and the morale of our technologists.”

In this video, Marina Downs, Northern Health Diagnostic Imaging Manager, speaks on how the addition of the MRI machine in Terrace has reduced patient wait times and travel, directly affecting the experience of both staff and patients.

Margeret Kostyshyn, a recent UHNBC patient, mentions how her MRI experience was “very positive,” and how the reassuring staff took away her initial fears of the process.

Thanks to additional provincial investments in MRI services across the province, Northern Health is expected to increase the number of MRIs performed by 70% over last year, and an additional 102 MRI hours of operation have been added (between the Fort St. John, Prince George, and Terrace MRI locations).

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Northern Health MRI Improvements: Ken Winnig and Karen Eldridge

“About a year ago, we were only able to do about 7,500 MRIs. Today, we’re on target to do over 13,000.”

There’s some pretty exciting MRI news circulating throughout the North! Since the installation of the two new machines in Terrace and Fort St. John, and a new replacement unit in Prince George, the northern region has seen some pretty incredible results.

In this video, Ken Winnig, Northern Health Regional Director of Diagnostic Services, explains the benefits of the new machines. Additionally, hear from Karen Eldridge, a recent patient, who’s been positively impacted!

Thanks to additional provincial investments in MRI services across the province, Northern Health is expected to increase the number of MRIs performed by 70% over last year, and an additional 102 MRI hours of operation have been added (between the Fort St. John, Prince George, and Terrace MRI locations).

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Garry’s story: Coordinated team care + courage add up to a remarkable recipe for change

Headshot of Garry McPhee.

Garry McPhee, 50, is a member of the Tahltan First Nation in Northern British Columbia, which includes the communities of Telegraph Creek and Dease Lake. The Fort St. John resident had struggled with alcohol addiction, and also suffers from seizures. For much of the past 20 years, Garry has been homeless.

In June 2016, Northern Health’s Intensive Case Management Team (ICMT) became involved in Garry’s care. This story describes how the team was able to help Garry tap into his own inner strength and courage, and support him to abstinence, dignity, and independence.

The Intensive Case Management Team gets involved

The ICMT is a multidisciplinary team whose goal is to improve its clients’ health and social functioning. The team works with people who struggle with both substance use and mental illness. They provide case management and support navigating health and social services. The team also plays an important role in advocating with community services to ensure quality care for their clients. The team is made up of substance use specialists, life skills workers, and nurses.

The ICMT became part of Garry’s life in June 2016.

“Before:” A dangerous situation

At this point, Garry’s life was chaotic and his health was poor. He was drinking, his seizures became unmanageable, and he was in danger of becoming homeless again. During a 6-month period, Garry spent over 60 days in hospital due to his deteriorating health.

During the 113 days he wasn’t in hospital, Garry visited Emergency 190 times — an average of 1.6 times per day – often arriving by ambulance or RCMP. Fort St. John paramedics, emergency room staff, and RCMP officers all knew him on a first-name basis.

When ICMT became involved, Garry was living at the Northern Centre of Hope in Fort St. John, using his income assistance cheque to pay for room and board. Garry was soon housed in the Supportive Recovery Bed program, a housing program for homeless people who are struggling with substance use.

In the past Garry had tried residential treatment, but due to a negative experience, he was wary of attending again. He rarely saw his family doctor.

Building trust and setting the stage for change

When the ICMT started working with Garry, their first priority was to build a trusting relationship: they met him regularly, whether at the Northern Centre of Hope, the hospital, or on the street. With his participation, Garry and the team created a patient-centred plan to enhance his quality of care.

Sometimes their interactions with Garry would just be to say “Hi!” and ask about his day. At other times, the ICMT had a more varied role:

  • Helping Garry learn about being safe and healthy, despite his alcohol use.
  • Helping him manage his medications.
  • Attending medical appointments with him.
  • Arranging ongoing physical and mental health assessments.
  • Coordinating his care, including social services.
  • Ensuring he attended for regular lab work.

Together with emergency department staff, the ICMT team developed an emergency department care plan for Garry. This was to make sure that when Garry was in hospital, he’d get the best care possible.

The team also met often with Northern Centre of Hope staff to give them support around working with Garry, and to make sure he could keep his housing with them.

As well, ICMT encouraged Garry to:

  • See his family doctor regularly, and follow up with lab work when needed.
  • Visit community psychiatric services.

ICMT also collaborated with Garry’s family doctor and psychiatrist to ensure he was receiving the best care.

During ICMT’s involvement, there were significant changes. Garry had only 135 visits to the emergency department and spent only 20 days in hospital — a 29% reduction in emergency department visits, and a 67% reduction in hospital days.  

ICMT also helped Garry apply for BC’s Persons with Disabilities program (PWD). He successfully joined the program, giving him a more secure source of income.

Throughout, ICMT always respected Garry’s dignity and his right to make his own decisions. Garry was always the one in charge of any changes that were made.

Tragedy brings a fresh challenge

Garry is the oldest of five children, and he and his younger brother were very close. They lived together at the Northern Centre of Hope and spent most of their time together. The brothers were always looking out for each other.

But in July 2017, Garry’s brother passed away. This was a very difficult time for Garry and he thought about moving back to the Yukon, even though he knew that he would likely return to drinking. ICMT checked in with Garry regularly to offer any support they could.

Garry had been undecided about residential treatment for his alcohol use. His experience at the previous treatment centre wasn’t positive, and he had been worried about leaving his brother and mother behind in Fort St. John.

But after his brother died, Garry’s feelings changed. When he was offered a spot in a residential program in Prince George, he took the brave step of deciding to go. ICMT worked with the treatment centre in advance to make sure that Garry would have the best possible chance for success.

Before attending treatment, Garry stayed in the Prince George Detox Centre. There he attended recovery groups, met the staff, and heard other clients’ stories about recovery. After hearing many positive reviews, he was excited about going to the treatment centre. After he completed detox, Garry attended residential treatment for 42 days.

“After:” A new life of abstinence and dignity

Since finishing treatment and returning home to Fort St. John, Garry’s life has been a catalogue of independence, self-care, and confidence. It’s a stunning contrast to his old life. His experience is a testament to the support from the ICMT staff, and proof of this man’s courage and strength in making real change:

  • Garry has abstained from alcohol, and he’s been attending AA meetings. Instead of drinking, he spends time with friends at the Northern Centre of Hope or cooks meals with them, which they eat together while watching sports.
  • He attended the treatment centre’s refresher program in June 2018, and may attend again in June 2019.
  • He regularly visits the hospital to see his mother in Peace Villa or to say a quick “Hi and thank you” to emergency room staff.
  • He has been arranging his own medical appointments without ICMT’s help.
  • He’s currently renting a room in the high barrier housing program at the Northern Centre of Hope.
  • Garry is a caring and responsible pet owner, ensuring his 15+ goldfish are always fed and happy.
  • And, finally, Garry volunteers weekly at the Salvation Army clothing store in Fort St. John.

This inspiring story shows the massive difference that coordinated team care can make to a person’s life and health. It’s also a deeply humbling story that reminds all of us that it’s never too late for change.

Northern Health thanks the Intensive Case Management Team for their outstanding work with Garry, and most importantly, we thank Garry for sharing this uplifting story – we know it will inspire many others.

Bailee Denicola

About Bailee Denicola

Bailee is a communications advisor in the Primary Care Department and was born and raised in Prince George. She graduated from UNBC with an anthropology degree and loves exploring cultures and learning about people. When not at work, Bailee can be found hanging out with her dogs, building her house with her husband, or travelling the world.

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Sharing stories: “What matters to you?” events help improve health care

Andrea Goodine, NE Quality Improvement Coach, and Edwina Nearhood, Patient Partner, celebrating What Matters to You Day.

Andrea Goodine, NE Quality Improvement Coach, and Edwina Nearhood, Patient Partner, celebrating What Matters to You Day in Fort St John.

Asking patients “What matters to you?” can lead to valuable feedback that helps improve health care.

When Edwina Nearwood, a patient partner with Patient Voices Network (PVN), heard about the “What matters to you?” initiative put on by the BC Patient Safety & Quality Council (BCPSQC), she knew it was the perfect opportunity for patients and care providers to share their stories.

In the words of the BCPSQC, “when providers have a conversation about what really matters to the people they care for, it helps them ensure that care is aligned with patient preferences and provide more patient- and family-centred care.”

With the support and guidance of Northern Health Quality Improvement leads and former PVN Engagement Leader Anthony Gagne, Edwina arranged an event at the Fort St. John Hospital in June 2017.

“People came to the hospital specifically to share their stories,” she says. “They wanted Northern Health to learn from their experiences and update practice.”

The event was attended by many patients and care providers, who talked about what was important to them, as well as any concerns they had.

Northern Health leaders in Fort St. John were extremely receptive to the feedback, and created an action plan with quality improvement initiatives. One example of improved service was a better system of prioritization in the radiology department that resulted in more timely service to patients.

Viva Swanson, Patient Partner, and Andrea Goodine, NE Quality Improvement Coach, with a cart full of swag for What Matters to You Day.

Viva Swanson, Patient Partner, and Andrea Goodine, NE Quality Improvement Coach, preparing for What Matters to You Day in Fort St John.

Continuing the success from 2017, Edwina and other patient partners, including Viva Swanson, hosted their own “What matters to you?” event in Fort St. John in June 2018.  Once again, the response from patients and care providers was very positive.

“Patients, residents, family, visitors, staff, and physicians were quite curious and interested in hearing the story behind it,” says Swanson. “The branding of the campaign inspired people to ask what was going on and the ‘why’ behind it.”

Patient partners are tremendously important in improving the way Northern Health delivers care. Events such as “What matters to you?” open the dialogue and improve communication between health care providers and patients.

While Edwina has already had great success in hosting these events, she knows there’s still room to grow. Her goals are to collaborate with doctors and other health care providers to grow “What matters to you?” conversations to the point where they become second nature.

For more information on “What matters to you?”, visit the BC Patient Safety & Quality Council website at www.bcpsqc.ca.

Tamara Reichert

About Tamara Reichert

Tamara is the communications advisor for the innovation and development commons at Northern Health where she works on a number of projects with the research, quality improvement, clinical simulation, and education teams. Born and raised in Prince George, Tamara grew up on a ranch where she rode horses, played with farm animals, built forts, and raided the family garden. She enjoys spending time travelling, hiking, cooking, reading, and cheering for her favourite sports teams.

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Overcoming challenges for physical activity

Crystal, outside physical activity.

Crystal, showing dedication and braving the Dawson Creek winter elements to fit some physical activity into her work day.

Fourteen years ago I was diagnosed with an autoimmune disorder that drastically turned my world upside down. Being active was something that was always important to me and now, at the age of only 20 years old, I was faced with learning how to live with a disease that affected my ability to perform even the simplest of everyday activities.

Working at Northern Health has been a good fit for me, but especially in managing my health. I have enough flexibility in the job that on good days I could be out in the field working and on bad days I could stay in the office. As time went on, I noticed that I started to spend more time in the office. As a result, I walked less and sat much more. Something needed to change.

In 2009 I made a life change. I stepped outside of my personal comfort zone and signed up for a 12 week boot camp at the local gym. I still remember that first day. I was so self-conscious about being weak and poorly conditioned. But, instead of giving up, I kept with it. I also hired a personal trainer. It was a learning experience for both of us as we figured out how I could modify the movements.

At Northern Health we are beginning to walk the walk and be the face of health within our communities and, as we have learned the last few weeks, workplaces are great locations to promote healthy living and integrate physical activity into daily life. I decided that I wanted to use what I had learned over the years and share it with my co-workers, so I created a contest.

In the winter of 2013, the Dawson Creek and Fort St. John health units challenged the Smithers and Terrace health units in the first ever internal Workplace Wellness “Healthier You Challenge.” This challenge was a fun, in-house 12-week pilot project designed around the Northern Health position papers. The focus of the challenge was to educate and engage staff on incorporating healthy lifestyle behaviours into their everyday routines.

Between the four health units, over 100 staff committed to the challenge. Each week I sent out a new worksheet that explained the week’s challenge. The “weekly” challenges were designed to get you moving and start thinking about healthy food choices.

The physical activity component was based on the key message that every move counts. This theme was carried over from week to week. Anytime an employee participated in any form of physical activity for 10 minutes or more, they logged that into their worksheet and gained points for their team. Participants also gained points for every kilometre travelled and/or steps that they took for the day. I got lots of motivation from B.C.’s Physical Activity Line.

The food challenges were based on Canada’s Food Guide and provincial initiatives. These changed week to week. Examples included eating vegetables and fruit, and reducing the amount of trans fat and high sodium foods that were consumed.

One of the big successes of the challenge was the creation of the “Break Challenge.” During the challenge, employees were encouraged to participate in some sort of physical activity for 15 minutes while at work. Each day a group of staff from the Dawson Creek Health Unit could be found outside walking around on their coffee breaks. It was common on the really cold days to find staff lunging, frog jumping, or walking in the hallways. At the end of Week 1, employees had participated in 342 physical activity breaks, 306 hours of physical activity, and had walked 2097 kms.

At the end of the challenge I surveyed participants, asking them what they liked best about the challenge and what changes they had made in their workplace as a result of the challenge. Some of the comments were:

  • Breaking down the challenge week by week made it feel more manageable and seem less daunting. I also liked the fact there was a different challenge each week.
  • For me the best part of the challenge was the joining of the individuals in our health unit to challenge each other in a supportive environment.
  • Able to critically look at the everyday and identify small opportunities for positive change vs. drastic and likely short lived changes.

This is the challenge that I developed for my fellow co-workers. It was fun and really got people engaged. For more information on some of the weekly challenges, or to find out which health unit won bragging rights, make sure to keep an eye for my future updates on the Northern Health blog. Alternatively, if you are looking for a workplace wellness program that your workplace can join, we encourage you to look at the Canadian Cancer Society’s Wellness Fits program.

Crystal Brown

About Crystal Brown

Accepting a position as an Environmental Health Officer with Northern Health, Crystal Brown moved from Nova Scotia to Dawson Creek in 2004. Since then, Crystal has developed an interest in health promotion and how our built environments impact our health. As the B.C. Branch President-Elect since 2011, Crystal works provincially and nationally with the Canadian Institute of Public Health Inspectors to promote the mission statement and maintain the integrity of public health. In this, she also participates in initiatives that will help to strengthen and advance the profession. To stay active, Crystal attends a morning outdoor boot camp, runs and walks her dogs. In August, Crystal participated and completed her first ever Emperor's Challenge in Tumbler Ridge, B.C.

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