Healthy Living in the North

Foodie Friday: Game On….the hunter’s twist on the classic Beef Bourguignon

Hunting season is upon us. If you asked me 10 years ago if I would be excited about a freezer full of game meat, my answer would have been a resounding “NO.”

I’m not generally a big fan of red meat and therefore my imagination regarding what to do with it was pretty limited (tacos or spaghetti anyone??). However my husband, an enthusiastic hunter, has managed to gradually increase my eagerness towards that freezer full of meat. For one thing, it’s a real cost saver not having to purchase meat at the supermarket. I estimate that I save anywhere from $500-700 per year, not to mention the health benefits. Game meat is far leaner than domesticated livestock and you don’t have to worry about hormones, steroid, or antibiotic use when harvesting your meat from the great outdoors. If you are passionate about eating local and organic, this is one way to do exactly that in the north all year round.

Beef Bourguignon or Beef Burgundy is a French stew of beef braised in red wine and beef broth and usually flavoured with herbs, garlic, pearl onions, and mushrooms. So far so good right?! For this twist on the classic I used elk because, well, I have it….lots of it. Wild game tends to be a lot drier due to the lower fat content so cooking it ‘low and slow’ can keep it from turning into an old boot.

This recipe is comfort food at its best, which is great timing as the weather turns colder. I serve mine over creamy mashed potatoes, but you could also substitute rice, quinoa, or spaghetti squash, or just serve with warm biscuits.

plate of stew on table with table settings

Wild game tends to be a lot drier due to the lower fat content so be sure to cook it ‘low and slow’.

 

Elk Burgundy

Ingredients:

  • 2 pounds elk stew meat
  • 6 slices bacon, chopped
  • 2 cups dry red wine
  • 1 cup brandy
  • 2 ½ cups low sodium beef broth
  • 2 Tbsp tomato paste
  • 1 large yellow onion, chopped
  • 4 Tbsp flour
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 3 sprigs of fresh thyme
  • 1 cup pearl onions
  • 1 lb mushrooms, sliced
  • 2 Tbsp butter
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Instructions:

  1. Preheat oven to 450°
  2. Heat Dutch oven pot over medium-high heat and cook bacon until lightly browned.
  3. Remove and drain on a paper towel. Leave bacon drippings in the pot.
  4. Sear cubed meat in bacon drippings in two batches. Remove meat and set aside.
  5. Add chopped onion and garlic and sauté until translucent.
  6. Add meat back to Dutch oven with onions. Sprinkle flour over meat and stir to coat. Place in oven, uncovered for 5 minutes. Stir meat again and return to oven for 5 more minutes.
  7. Remove from oven and reduce oven temperature to 350° Add cooked bacon, wine, brandy, tomato paste, beef broth, the bay leaf and thyme into the meat mixture. Stir to combine. Put on lid and return to oven for 2-3 hours until meat is tender.
  8. One hour prior to serving, melt butter in skillet and sauté mushrooms until browned. Add mushrooms and the pearl onions to the meat mixture and return the covered Dutch oven to the onion for the remaining hour.
  9. Remove from the oven and season with salt and pepper to taste. Remove the bay leaf and thyme sprigs and serve.

Recipe adapted from: Nevada Foodies

Carmen Maddigan

About Carmen Maddigan

Born and raised in Fort St John, Carmen returned home in 2007, after completing her internship in Prince George. She has since, filled a variety of different roles as a dietitian for Northern Health and currently works at Fort St John Hospital providing outpatient nutrition counselling. In her spare time, Carmen can be found testing out a variety of healthy and tasty meal ideas. She also enjoys running, camping, and playing outside in the sun or snow with her family.

Share

Foodie Friday: With gratitude to the hunters and the snow…

Moose in snow

Have you tried wild game before? Registered dietitian Victoria was hesitant at first but now has trouble going back to beef!

Winter is here and I am pretty excited. I love the first snowfall! Letting those first snowflakes settle on my face is one of my favorite winter moments. It’s a great time for families and friends to get out and have some fun together walking or playing in the snow.

After one of those outdoor winter adventures, it’s sure nice to come home to a hot meal. This is where a crock pot comes in handy! The recipe I’m sharing today is moose meat spaghetti sauce made in a crock pot so all you have to do is cook the pasta when you get home. Sound good? Of course, if you don’t have moose meat, you can always substitute ground beef.

I know many Indigenous people and northerners who hunt or have someone who hunts for them. I had the good fortune last year to be given some moose meat from a friend. I learned a lot from him about the best way to cook the meat and make sure it is safe to eat.

The First Nations Traditional Foods Fact Sheets from the First Nations Health Authority are a great resource on traditional foods such as moose. They provide nutritional information as well as traditional harvesting and food use. Moose meat is an excellent source of protein and B vitamins (riboflavin and niacin), and a good source of iron. It’s also low in saturated fat compared to modern domestic animals like beef.

I’ll admit that at first, my daughters and I were hesitant to try moose meat because we had not had it before. But after a few meals, we found it hard to go back to beef! Moose meat is a healthy and delicious northern food. I hope you enjoy winter and this great tasting crock pot moose meat spaghetti!

Crock pot moose spaghetti

Serves 4

Ingredients

  • 500 g ground moose meat
  • 2 tbsp oil
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1- 28 oz can of tomato sauce
  • 1- 6 oz can of tomato paste
  • 1 tsp dried basil
  • 2 tsp dried oregano
  • Other vegetables such as mushrooms or zucchini (optional)
  • 1 package spaghetti or other pasta noodles

Instructions

  1. Fry the ground moose meat in a frying pan with the oil until fully cooked. Put into crock pot.
  2. Add the rest of the ingredients except the noodles. Cook on high for 4 hours or low for 8 hours.
  3. When you are ready to eat, in separate pot, boil water, add the noodles, and cook as per the package directions. Drain. Serve with the sauce on top.

Serving suggestion:

  • If you like, you can garnish with parmesan cheese and serve with a tossed salad. A dessert such as frozen berries is a nice addition.
Victoria Carter

About Victoria Carter

Victoria works in Northern Health's Aboriginal health program as the lead for engagement and integration. She is an adopted member of the Nisga’a nation and was given the name “Nox Aama Goot” which means “mother of good heart.” In her work she sees herself as an ally working together with Aboriginal people across the north to improve access to quality health care. She keeps herself well by honouring the mental, emotional, physical and spiritual aspects of her life through spending time with her friends and family, being in nature and working on her own personal growth.

Share

Mother Nature’s wonderful benefits

Woman with hunting rifle standing on ridge overlooking fall scenery.

For Laurel, there’s nothing better than disconnecting from the everyday world and heading out to hunt, fish, camp, or explore northern B.C.’s beautiful wilderness. There are so many health benefits!

Growing up in a family that camped, hunted and fished, the outdoor lifestyle has very much become a part of who I am. For me, I cannot think of anything more therapeutic than disconnecting from the everyday world and taking in the wonderful benefits that Mother Nature has to offer.

On any given weekend when I’m free, you will most likely find me in the bush hunting or on a river or lake fishing. There is nothing better than eating organic foods and it is even more satisfying when you harvest that food yourself! Spending the day in the bush not only has the potential to provide food for the freezer but has many health benefits that go along with it. It is not unusual to spend hours hiking or walking when you’re hunting (and that’s just the easy part! The real work doesn’t begin until you have shot your animal!). Not only am I doing something that I love, but I am getting exercise while doing it – it’s a win-win!

Woman holding fish in river.

Food doesn’t get much fresher or more local & organic than fish or game you’ve caught or hunted yourself!

There are so many benefits to spending your free time outdoors (in my case, hunting and fishing) and being active:

  • Fresh air. This is #1 for me!
  • Organic food. It doesn’t get much more organic than something you’ve hunted yourself!
  • Vitamin D. Soak up that sunshine!
  • Quality time with loved ones. To my little family, hunting is who we are, and as hunters, we often associate time in the bush with people we care about.
  • Better mental health. Goodbye, stress!
Lakes and fall colours

The photography opportunities in northern B.C. are endless, as Laurel’s beautiful shot of Butler Ridge Provincial Park near Hudson’s Hope demonstrates!

As a bonus, the photography opportunities are endless! Northern B.C. is home to some of the most beautiful outdoor scenery and wildlife in the province. With moose, deer, elk, bear and numerous other animals living at your doorstep, it’s not uncommon to see these spectacular animals while going about your everyday life. We “northerners” often take these amazing sights for granted.

I always try to be grateful for everything in life, but when I’m on the river, in the bush or at the top of a mountain, breathing in that fresh, outdoor air and having monster bull elk come towards me, it’s an extra reminder of how blessed I am to be a hunter!

Are you a hunter or an outdoor enthusiast? What outdoor activities do you take part in to help maintain a happy and healthy lifestyle?

Laurel Traue

About Laurel Traue

Laurel Traue is the Regional Administrative Support for Public Health. She was born and raised in the Cariboo and loves being able to call this beautiful part of B.C. home. Laurel's passion is her family, and she loves to connect with them while spending time in the great outdoors. In her spare time, Laurel enjoys hunting, fishing, camping, hiking, spending time on the river, exploring new parts of the beautiful North and travelling!

Share