Healthy Living in the North

Clearing a path to the future: IMAGINE funding for Pidherny Recreation Site

There’s just something about the sound of tires rolling over dirt. It’s a hum, an almost sub-aural vibration, and at its best it moves through the rider’s body like a wave, washing away the mental cobwebs of a digital world and sweeping all consciousness into a singular, focused state.

man on mountain bike biking down a trailMaybe it’s this sensory gift that inspires mountain bikers to volunteer their time and energy to create and maintain the trails that provide it. But it was those volunteers themselves that inspired the Prince George Cycling Club to apply for IMAGINE Community Grant funding to purchase tools to support their efforts.

Pidherny Recreation Site is a popular trail network in Prince George that features a wide variety of trails catering to riders of all interests and abilities. The varied terrain of the rec site makes it an ideal location for trail development, and through careful planning and skillful execution, the site has evolved from a relatively small number of user-built trails into a vibrant, multi-use community recreation area. While mountain bikers are the primary user group on the trails, many local residents also enjoy walking there in the summer and snow-shoeing in the winter months. And with interest in the sport surging in the community, the future looks bright.

“We have seen tremendous growth in participation in mountain biking in Prince George over the past few seasons,” says Prince George Cycling Club Mountain Director Josh Staub. “As a non-profit organization, we rely on funding from grants like IMAGINE to provide safe and accessible trails for riders. The tools purchased with this grant will help ensure that the Pidherny Recreation Site remains safe and sustainable for years to come.”

Similar to a bike, community improvements like the Pidherny Rec Site keep on rolling. As interest in an activity grows, demand for infrastructure increases. As that infrastructure is developed, more people are attracted to the activity and the cycle is renewed by the increased demand for new options. Pidherny Rec Site is a perfect example of a community driven effort that not only contributes to the health and well-being of participants, but also draws them together. The IMAGINE Community Grant program is proud to support efforts like this throughout the Northern Health region, investing in the people and organizations who take action to make our communities healthier places for all!

For more information regarding IMAGINE Community Grants, and applying, visit the IMAGINE homepage , or email Imagine.Grants@northernhealth.ca with any questions.

Andrew Steele

About Andrew Steele

Andrew Steele is a 33-year-old HR Assistant living in Prince George, BC. He enjoys biking, paddling, and almost any outdoor activity you can name. When not on his bike, he enjoys spending time with his wife and daughter, listening to and playing music, reading and writing.

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IMAGINE grants: Why not your community?

When we invest in healthy communities, we all win!

Did you know that IMAGINE grant applications are being accepted right now until September 30th? That means you could receive up to $5,000 to put towards a healthy initiative in your community!

imagine stone.Do you have a community idea that dabbles in one of the following areas?

  • Healthy eating and food security
  • Physical activity and active living
  • Injury prevention
  • Tobacco-free communities
  • Positive mental health
  • Prevention of substance harms
  • Healthy early childhood development
  • Healthy aging
  • Healthy School Action

If yes, then fill out an application today! If you’d like to check out our past grants, have a look at our IMAGINE Grant Map!

If you’re curious on what makes a successful grant application, check  out IMAGINE Community Grants: Key factors for success in community! or Writing a grant application – anyone can do it! These two articles can help you kick start your idea, and give you the inside track to writing an awesome application!

Let’s make this IMAGINE granting season the busiest yet. After all, why not you, and why not your community?

Happy granting!

IMAGINE Community Grants provide funding to community organizations, service agencies, First Nations bands and organizations, schools, municipalities, regional districts, not-for-profits, and other partners with projects that make northern communities healthier. We are looking for applications that will support our efforts to prevent chronic disease and injury, and improve overall well-being in our communities.

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IMAGINE Grants: Agwiiyeet’inim̓ ahl g̱ahlgim̓ – We pass it on to our children

When Liza Haldane, LELP Coordinator, applied for an IMAGINE grant on behalf of the Lisims Early Learning Partnership, she wanted to honour the early learning table’s goals of celebrating their pre- and postnatal families by hosting an event that also raised awareness of the gaps in services for vulnerable members of the Nisga’a Nation: Lax̱galts’ap, Gingolx, Gitlax̱t’aamiks and Gitwinksihlkw (northwest of Terrace). For a goal like this to be achieved, she recognized that including the traditional and cultural values of the Nisga’a region would be very important. The relationships between generations and families would also have to be considered in the planning process and the event would have to carefully balance different traditions alongside the needed pre- and postnatal services. With all that in mind, project “Agwiiyeet’inim̓ ahl g̱ahlgim̓ – We pass it on to our children” was born!

A family hugging and smiling together.The goals of the project and event included:

  1. Honour the families who are expecting or who have newborn infants, and celebrate newborns in a traditional ceremony.
  2. Raise community awareness of the importance of supporting families who are expecting and who have newborn infants.
  3. Work together and practice Nisga’a law of Sayt-k’ilim-goot (one heart; to be united) by sharing services and resources for the betterment of Nisga’a families.
  4. Register families for existing programs and services.

How it happened:

Part of raising community awareness for supporting new or expecting families was done by welcoming entire families and the community to the event. This meant, during the event, families were circled and a prayer was said, making a commitment to support these families in raising their children.

At the event, prenatal families were invited to the front of the hall, honoured with a poem, and given a canvas painting to acknowledge their commitment to bringing a baby into this world. Families with newborns had the opportunity to have their questions answered, via a customized questionnaire that was provided. The babies were welcomed into their community with a beautiful house crest blanket, adorned upon them by their Wilp family members (members of a Wilp are all descendants of a common female ancestor). The total number of babies: 23 altogether!

A creative drawing of a pregnant woman.In order to share existing resources and programs, LELP partners, including early learning centers, public health nurses, community health representatives, Success By Six, and village governments, worked together and were united in delivering the ceremonies. Having partners experience and share equal time in the ceremonies helped balance tradition and incorporate wellness. After the ceremony, registration forms were made available and parents registered their children for the Imagination Library (books to kids program). Service providers spoke during the post-ceremony meal, promoting Dax̱gadim Anluuhlkw (translates to Strong Nest, which is a delivery and development strong start program), Welcome Baby Bags, and other relevant services.

“These events were so emotional. To see two to three generations of families proudly welcoming their babies into the community evoked emotions of happiness, pride, and so much love! At the end, we encircled the families in a community prayer, holding them up with words of strength and encouragement – it was very spiritual and moving.

A Chief got up and spoke at the end of the Laxgalt’sap/Gingolx event – he was full of gratitude and blessings for the ceremony. He said after tonight, he was once again filled with hope for our community, our culture and traditions. It brought many of us to tears.”

-Liza Haldane

What’s next?

As a result of this successful event and the sparked interest in traditional child rearing, organizers delivered a “Yask” workshop (rights of passage) for pre- and postnatal families and are working together to deliver another set of welcome baby ceremonies. These workshops will eventually rotate into smaller communities. The plan is to deliver ceremonies annually!

What is a Northern Health IMAGINE grant?

IMAGINE Community Grants provide funding to community organizations, service agencies, First Nations bands and organizations, schools, municipalities, regional districts, not-for-profits, and other partners with projects that make northern communities healthier. We look for applicants that will support our efforts to prevent chronic disease and injury, and improve overall well-being in our communities.

 

 

 

 

 

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IMAGINE Community Grants: Key factors for success in community!

With the first IMAGINE Community Grants call open and in full swing, one question that I have frequently been asked from groups is: “What are you looking for in a project idea?”

That’s the great thing about the IMAGINE program: they are YOUR ideas! It’s true, as a health authority, we want to support projects with a focus to improve health and wellness in community, so we do have some criteria around our chronic disease and injury prevention priorities. But, how it will take shape, and what activities will work best for your community, is up to YOU!

It’s referenced in our application guide, and is worth mentioning that we do give preference to the projects that have considered some key factors to planning their project for long term success. To touch on a few of those factors, we are looking for projects that will:

Support partnerships and build relationships

  • The project will bring different groups in the community to connect and work together to achieve common goals.

Identify a community need

  • The project will address something that is missing in their community and that will benefit the residents to improve their health and wellness.

Build capacity

  • The project will develop and strengthen skills and resources within the community.

As an example, a great project that makes me think of these points took place in Mackenzie, where the Mackenzie Gets Healthy Committee applied to purchase floor curling equipment for the community to address the imminent demolition of their aging ice curling rink. The group wanted to ensure that people in the community were still able to participate in this fun and accessible recreational activity in the absence of the facility.

Throughout the project, PE teachers at Mackenzie Secondary School partnered to use the equipment for their students, and the Mackenzie Public Library benefitted by using the equipment at the library. They even held Olympic-themed activities during the recent 2018 Olympic Games!

The community recreation centre is currently undergoing renovations which will include future space to offer floor curling and keep the activity going in community.

The floor curling equipment has provided an additional opportunity for residents to be active.  The equipment has also exposed many students in our community to this sport for the first time.” – Joan Atkinson, Mackenzie Gets Healthy.

Another great idea that had strong key factors took place in Chetwynd. The Chetwynd Communications Society’s main goal for their project, Healthy Living Initiative Plans and Programs in Chetwynd, was to focus on bringing new resources and options for activity to the community by supporting the training and certification of their own community champions. Those that were interested in receiving certification had to apply to the group, and then agree to provide free lessons in community for at least nine months.

Dance instructors teaching dance to crowd.

IMAGINE grants bring everyone together!

The project was very successful and saw a number of people apply for the opportunity. The group focused on choosing a handful of applicants that would support and engage in the community area broadly, including in a school setting and within First Nations and Métis communities. One of the successful applicants even included an RCMP Constable!

The celebration of the initiative and promotion of the successful participants took place at the Chetwynd’s Canada Day 150 Celebration, where over 1000 people were in attendance and participated in Zumba activities.

Our volunteers are committed to delivering planned and ad hoc Zumba classes and being videotaped doing these activities… the Zumba Program has caught on because it is entertaining, involves the entire family and has volunteers who are friendly, eager and willing to give of themselves. 2018 will see at least an additional 1000 persons participating in our dance program.”- Leo Sabulsky, Chetwynd Communications Society.

Those are just two examples of how IMAGINE funds have supported great community-led work across our region. Can you believe there are another 820 projects that Northern Health has supported in offering this program to communities since 2009? So many communities and so many amazing examples of what a community can accomplish! What is your project idea?  Share it with us today!

little kids dancing with facepaint on.IMAGINE Community Grants provide funding to community organizations, service agencies, First Nations bands and organizations, schools, municipalities, regional districts, not-for-profits, and other partners with projects that make northern communities healthier. We are looking for applications that will support our efforts to prevent chronic disease and injury, and improve overall well-being in our communities. The deadline for the next cycle of IMAGINE Community Grants is March 31, 2018.

 

 

 

Mandy Levesque

About Mandy Levesque

Mandy Levesque is Northern Health’s Lead, Healthy Community Development, Integrated Community Granting. Born and raised in northern Manitoba, Mandy and her family moved to Prince George in 2013. Mandy has a background in public health and health promotion and is a graduate of the University of Saskatchewan. She is passionate about innovation and quality, empowering northern populations, and promoting health and wellness across communities. In her spare time, Mandy enjoys spending time with her family and stays active by taking in the exciting activities, trails, and events northern B.C. has to offer.

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IMAGINE Community Grants:  We have a map for that!

The first cycle of IMAGINE Community Grants for 2018 has recently launched and I have already been fielding a number of calls and inquiries from community about a variety of project ideas.  The passion and excitement that people have about these ideas, and the plans to put these ideas to action, gets me very excited! I am really looking forward to receiving applications from across our entire health region.

map with imagine grants

Click here to see some of the past IMAGINE grants!

Northern Health has been providing this funding opportunity to communities since 2008/2009, and we have made many improvements to the process over the past decade. Our goal has been to make the opportunity accessible for all, and make the application and evaluation process as easy as possible for community groups. In 2016, we introduced our IMAGINE Google Map as a way for applicants to see what projects have been funded in their community or area. It also allows for groups to get ideas from across the entire region and learn about initiatives that could be replicated or modified to improve health and wellness in their own community. Through the map, we are able to share a brief description of the project and photos- so you can actually see the great work that has happened as a result of the IMAGINE seed funding.

A very useful function with the Google map is the ability to search topics or places. I recommend using this function if you want to look for a specific type of project.  Are you looking for ideas for an injury prevention project? Or healthy eating? Or maybe you want to see what has been supported in a specific community? I encourage interested applicants to check out the map and see what ideas are out there and maybe even try to take them to the next level!

What idea can you take and expand on for your own community?

IMAGINE Community Grants provide funding to community organizations, service agencies, First Nations bands and organizations, schools, municipalities, regional districts, not-for-profits, and other partners with projects that make northern communities healthier. We are looking for applications that will support our efforts to prevent chronic disease and injury, and improve overall well-being in our communities. The deadline for the next cycle of IMAGINE Community Grants is March 31, 2018.

 

 

Mandy Levesque

About Mandy Levesque

Mandy Levesque is Northern Health’s Lead, Healthy Community Development, Integrated Community Granting. Born and raised in northern Manitoba, Mandy and her family moved to Prince George in 2013. Mandy has a background in public health and health promotion and is a graduate of the University of Saskatchewan. She is passionate about innovation and quality, empowering northern populations, and promoting health and wellness across communities. In her spare time, Mandy enjoys spending time with her family and stays active by taking in the exciting activities, trails, and events northern B.C. has to offer.

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IMAGINE Community Grants: An opportunity to connect with your community

With the launch of the final cycle of 2017 IMAGINE Community Grants, this time of year has me waiting in anticipation to see what exciting ideas will be submitted, and reflecting on some of my favorites from past cycles.

Don’t get me wrong- all projects selected for grant support are excellent ideas, and we love the work the groups and organizations do to promote healthier communities. The things they can accomplish with just a bit of seed money is truly amazing! However, there are a few that just stick with you because they’re a bit different from the rest.

One such project that comes to my mind when thinking about IMAGINE came to us from Kispiox last fall. In this application, a local youth basketball team asked for supplies to provide weekly visits to Elders in their own homes throughout the winter, where they would chop and stack wood, and shovel their driveways and walkways for them. The youth and their chaperones engaged in physical activity to support the Elders, but the main focus of the project was creating those inter-generational linkages that promote and support social connectedness and positive mental wellness. A true benefit for everyone in the community!

IMAGINE grants believing in our project gave us the confidence to start connecting with our community. It gave our children self-esteem and filled their hearts with how good it feels to give back to the community without expecting anything in return. The feedback and support we received from our community members was unreal. It was the perfect time to share with a boys under 12 basketball team, (it’s) such an important and tender age to have such an experience.” – Serita Pottinger, IMAGINE Grant Applicant

elders, imagine granting

The Elders were very appreciative.

The original application request was to purchase gloves, axes, and snow shovels for the project. To incorporate an injury prevention lens, we proposed that they also purchase safety glasses to protect the youth and the group agreed with the recommendation. Now that they have the supplies, the group plans to continue this work for years to come.

imagine granting, helping elders

These kids sure know how to help!

For me, this project is a great example of prevention in action, and shows how a small amount of grant funding can improve and impact the health of an entire community. The IMAGINE Community Grants is just one of many ways that Northern Health demonstrates how we care for communities and can support others with the same goal.

IMAGINE Community Grants provide funding to community organizations, service agencies, First Nations bands and organizations, schools, municipalities, regional districts, not-for-profits, and other partners with projects that make northern communities healthier. We are looking for applications that will support our efforts to prevent chronic disease and injury, and improve overall well-being in our communities. The deadline for the next cycle of IMAGINE Community Grants is November 30, 2017.

 

Mandy Levesque

About Mandy Levesque

Mandy Levesque is Northern Health’s Lead, Healthy Community Development, Integrated Community Granting. Born and raised in northern Manitoba, Mandy and her family moved to Prince George in 2013. Mandy has a background in public health and health promotion and is a graduate of the University of Saskatchewan. She is passionate about innovation and quality, empowering northern populations, and promoting health and wellness across communities. In her spare time, Mandy enjoys spending time with her family and stays active by taking in the exciting activities, trails, and events northern B.C. has to offer.

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HIV/AIDS awareness through the arts: An IMAGINE grant project in action

Northern Health’s IMAGINE Community Grants provide funding to a variety of groups with projects that make northern communities healthier. Our hope is that these innovative projects inspire healthy community actions where you live! Check out the story below and read more IMAGINE Community Grant stories.


They say a picture is worth a thousand words. After seeing the amazing entries in the art and slogan contest that formed part of the Learning HIV/AIDS Awareness through the Arts / Multicultural Festival, I can’t argue with that!

To get people talking about HIV/AIDS, the Dze L K’ant Friendship Centre Society came up with a unique, three-part project that was supported by an IMAGINE grant. The project included:

  1. An art / slogan contest for HIV/AIDS awareness.
  2. A series of monthly, free workshops on a variety of art topics where participants could get HIV/AIDS information as well as art supplies.
  3. An art gala and multicultural festival to bring the community together and to display the many messages and creations that were submitted.

Throughout the project, the organizers shared information about HIV/AIDS, testing locations, and community resources.

Why an art-based project?

“Art in its many forms – paintings, music, dance, and more – has always been a means for people of all backgrounds to gather and break down barriers and inhibitions,” shared Patricia Kolida, project organizer. “This project has given the opportunity for HIV/AIDS awareness and cultural inclusiveness for the whole community.”

I could tell you all about the entries, the creative slogans, and the powerful messages, but that would miss the point entirely, wouldn’t it? So, without further ado, here are a few of my favourite submissions:

Colourful poster reading: HIV comes in many colours. Be HIV aware.

Poster with drawing of light bulb reads: Bring HIV to light. Don't be in dark.

Flowers growing out of pot with text reading: Bring AIDS awareness to life and save a life. Be safe.

Poster with text: Respect, love, peace, courage

First Nations art

Poster with text: "HIV awareness. Please protect yourself ... talk to someone!

Poster with red ribbon and text: "Be HIV aware. Get tested."

Colourful poster with text: "Beware of HIV. It affects everyone. Don't discriminate. Be part of solution, not the discrimination.

How did it go?

According to Patricia, “It was a joy to see our clients within the community engage in the many HIV/AIDS awareness art workshops to produce their messages of HIV/AIDS awareness. The clients felt proud of their accomplishments, which were on display at our art gala. The evening was rich with multicultural entertainment showcasing traditional and modern performances. Speeches were given with message that HIV/AIDS affects all cultures, races, ages, and genders.”

What creative ideas do you have to promote healthy outcomes in your community? Apply for an IMAGINE grant today!


IMAGINE Community Grants provide funding to community organizations, service agencies, First Nations bands and organizations, schools, municipalities, regional districts, not-for-profits, and other partners with projects that make northern communities healthier. We are looking for applications that will support our efforts to prevent chronic disease and injury, and improve overall well-being in our communities. At the time of this story’s publication, the deadline for the next cycle of IMAGINE Community Grants is March 31, 2017.

Vince Terstappen

About Vince Terstappen

Vince Terstappen is a Project Assistant with the health promotions team at Northern Health. He has an undergraduate and graduate degree in the area of community health and is passionate about upstream population health issues. Born and raised in Calgary, Vince lived, studied, and worked in Saskatoon, Victoria, and Vancouver before moving to Vanderhoof in 2012. When not cooking or baking, he enjoys speedskating, gardening, playing soccer, attending local community events, and Skyping with his old community health classmates who are scattered across the world. Vince works with Northern Health program areas to share healthy living stories and tips through the blog and moderates all comments for the Northern Health Matters blog. (Vince no longer works with Northern Health, we wish him all the best.)

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Writing a grant application – anyone can do it!

Group of young people with archery equipment

The Eagle Eye Archers in Prince Rupert are one group that benefited from an IMAGINE grant. Take steps to make sure that your grant application hits the mark!

For many people, even the thought of writing a grant proposal or application is intimidating. Rest assured that by keeping a few key tips in mind, anyone can do it!

Most grant programs get more applications than there are funds available. Whether you are applying for one of Northern Health’s grants (IMAGINE Community Grant applications are now open!) or are looking into a different grant program, follow these tips to ensure that your application stands out above the rest!

1. Know your project plan

  • Read the application beforehand and ensure that you are able to answer all questions and sections fully. Your enthusiasm for your project should come through.

2. Know your audience

  • Who will be able to participate in this project and the activities? Northern Health grants are keen to support projects that reduce health inequities and help those who are disadvantaged or vulnerable to improve their access to supports and resources for better health.

3. Confirm your timelines

  • Many grant programs have multiple cycles per year as well as deadlines for project completion and evaluation. Does your project start date fit within this timeline or should you wait for a future cycle?

4. List key project partners

  • Strong partnerships = strong projects! Working with other groups builds capacity and can be a great opportunity to learn from one another. Partnerships also help to ensure sustainability. Having more people involved can help to grow the project and increases its chance of lasting.
  • When listing partners, you should be able to explain their roles and responsibilities in the project.

5. Describe and connect project goals and activities

  • Be very specific about what you want to achieve in your community through your project. What is the ultimate goal(s)? What will success look like?
  • You should be able to directly connect your planned activities to these goals.

6. Explain the benefit to community

  • Applications should describe why a project is needed in your community. What sets your project apart from others in the community?

7. Have a clear budget

  • Remember to include all of the costs that will be associated with your project activities. Ensure that the total cost of the project is explained, specify the amount being requested from the grant, and identify where any other sources of funding will be coming from.
  • Confirming fundraising efforts or that other sources of funding have been explored shows community engagement and motivation for the project to succeed. Don’t forget to identify in-kind or free supports.
  • Ensure that the funding you are requesting fits the grant criteria. For example, if wages aren’t eligible for coverage under the grant criteria, don’t request them in your application.

8. Describe the future plans to keep the project going

  • We want to support projects that are thinking about sustainability from the beginning and we are less likely to support a one-time event or activity. Provide details on how the project will continue to grow in your community. Use a grant like our IMAGINE grant as the seed to get you started!

9. Get letters of support from partners and community members

  • Letters of support from project partners, additional funders, or people who will benefit from the project in the community are a great help! They show engagement and investment.
  • One or two letters are enough, but they should be specific to the project.

10. Choose an exciting project name

  • Choose a name for your project that will grab people’s attention – whether that’s the person reading the application or someone who wants to learn more about your project in the community. Be unique but keep it simple!

11. Learn from others


A version of this article first appeared in the winter 2016 issue of Healthier You magazine.

Mandy Levesque

About Mandy Levesque

Mandy Levesque is Northern Health’s Lead, Healthy Community Development, Integrated Community Granting. Born and raised in northern Manitoba, Mandy and her family moved to Prince George in 2013. Mandy has a background in public health and health promotion and is a graduate of the University of Saskatchewan. She is passionate about innovation and quality, empowering northern populations, and promoting health and wellness across communities. In her spare time, Mandy enjoys spending time with her family and stays active by taking in the exciting activities, trails, and events northern B.C. has to offer.

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Growing local food in Fort Nelson

Northern Health’s IMAGINE Community Grants provide funding to a variety of groups with projects that make northern communities healthier. Our hope is that these innovative projects inspire healthy community actions where you live! Check out the story below and read more IMAGINE Community Grant stories.


Greenhouse

The sun shines on a greenhouse built for youth and family programs in Fort Nelson. The greenhouse was funded by an IMAGINE grant.

Sometimes when groups are looking at the healthy eating and food security needs in their community, the idea of applying for “seed funding” from the IMAGINE Community Grants program is taken very literally. Other times, especially in a region where the growing season is “short in days but long in daylight hours,” those seeds need just a little more help.

That’s what the Northern Rockies Regional Municipality was proposing with their Youth Sustainability Greenhouse Project, which got an IMAGINE grant in the spring of 2016. As the Regional Municipality looked for ways to involve more youth and families in local food production in Fort Nelson (they had already put in a few raised garden beds in 2015), building a greenhouse was an excellent way to address a need, promote healthy outcomes, and create a project that would last.

Youth working in a greenhouse

Young people in the Summer Fun Program planted, cared for, and harvested vegetables from seed.

The greenhouse they built, which was used by young people in the local Summer Fun Program, served two primary purposes, according to project coordinator Krista Vandersteen:

  1. Local food: “Youth in the program planted, cared for and harvested vegetables from both the garden and the greenhouse. Participants planted various vegetables from seed, including carrots, spinach, lettuce, peas, beans, squash, tomatoes, garlic, and green onion … The greenhouse allowed the participants to actively grow vegetables that they could not in the adjacent garden.”
  2. Education: “Once per week, the Northern Rockies Sustainability Coordinator visited the program to teach participants different lessons regarding food growth and [food] security. The children also learned about healthy eating and why vegetables are important in their diet. 135 youth participated throughout the summer, learning about multiple topics such as composting 101, using a rain barrel, and the importance of bees … Parents enjoyed that the program contained a practical educational component that their children may not be receiving in school.”

Now that the greenhouse has been funded and built with the support of an IMAGINE grant, the new gardening and education parts of the Summer Fun Program will be continuing annually.

The bumper crop that resulted from the greenhouse and the talented young gardeners also created the chance for a unique partnership. “When the project ended,” said Vandersteen, “the Northern Rockies Regional Municipality was left with extra produce that had not been eaten or used in programming. An effort was made to reach out to the local food bank as perishable food is often difficult to acquire.” Now, the project organizers are working with the local food bank to set up a partnership for next year. “As extra produce is harvested throughout the growing season,” said Vandersteen, “it will be donated to the food bank. The partnership will help to ensure no produce is wasted, and is going to people in need.”

It’s clear that in Fort Nelson, the IMAGINE Community Grant seed funding has grown into something pretty impressive!


IMAGINE Community Grants provide funding to community organizations, service agencies, First Nations bands and organizations, schools, municipalities, regional districts, not-for-profits, and other partners with projects that make northern communities healthier. We are looking for applications that will support our efforts to prevent chronic disease and injury, and improve overall well-being in our communities. At the time of this story’s publication, the deadline for the next cycle of IMAGINE Community Grants is March 31, 2017.

Vince Terstappen

About Vince Terstappen

Vince Terstappen is a Project Assistant with the health promotions team at Northern Health. He has an undergraduate and graduate degree in the area of community health and is passionate about upstream population health issues. Born and raised in Calgary, Vince lived, studied, and worked in Saskatoon, Victoria, and Vancouver before moving to Vanderhoof in 2012. When not cooking or baking, he enjoys speedskating, gardening, playing soccer, attending local community events, and Skyping with his old community health classmates who are scattered across the world. Vince works with Northern Health program areas to share healthy living stories and tips through the blog and moderates all comments for the Northern Health Matters blog. (Vince no longer works with Northern Health, we wish him all the best.)

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New issue of Healthier You: Community grants in action!

Magazine cover

The winter issue of Healthier You magazine is all about community grants in action.

What does it mean to support “healthy people in healthy communities”? That’s one of the questions that the latest issue of Healthier You magazine sets out to answer!

I really enjoyed reading through this issue and learning about the different ways that communities are taking actions that promote health and prevent disease.

Curious about what that means?

Take a look through the issue and you’ll find:

  • A local approach to preventing injury and promoting active transportation (Village of Queen Charlotte’s Bike Repair and Safety Program).
  • The Food Secure Kids program in the northeast challenging you to learn about food security through the experiences of students who are enjoying the taste of a carrot that they planted and grew themselves.
  • Local ideas that support healthier early years through Children First funded programs in Mackenzie & area, Prince George, Quesnel, and the Robson & Canoe Valleys.

Once these projects and others get you inspired to connect into healthy community projects where you live, don’t miss the issue’s handy information on:

Take a look through these stories online or look for a hard copy of the magazine in local doctors’ offices, clinics, and Northern Health facilities near you! All past issues of Healthier You are also available online.

Vince Terstappen

About Vince Terstappen

Vince Terstappen is a Project Assistant with the health promotions team at Northern Health. He has an undergraduate and graduate degree in the area of community health and is passionate about upstream population health issues. Born and raised in Calgary, Vince lived, studied, and worked in Saskatoon, Victoria, and Vancouver before moving to Vanderhoof in 2012. When not cooking or baking, he enjoys speedskating, gardening, playing soccer, attending local community events, and Skyping with his old community health classmates who are scattered across the world. Vince works with Northern Health program areas to share healthy living stories and tips through the blog and moderates all comments for the Northern Health Matters blog. (Vince no longer works with Northern Health, we wish him all the best.)

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