Healthy Living in the North

Don’t put your bikes away – Fall GoByBike is here!

Fall biking gear, like pants, a high-visibility vest, helmet, and gloves, are pictured.

Warm layers and reflective gear are key to safe and warm fall biking.

I don’t know about you, but I didn’t get out on my bike as much as I wanted to this summer! I’m chalking it up to rainy weather, dog-mom responsibilities, and general summer season busyness. I’m thankful for Bike to Work & School week – it helped me get a few more rides in at the beginning of the season!

Now that fall is here, I find myself itching to pull my bike out again. The crisp, cool air mixed with the blue skies, sunshine, and gorgeous colours of fall make being on two wheels an absolute joy. In fact, when I put it that way, fall might actually be my favourite cycling season!

Lucky for us, the GoByBike BC Society is giving us yet another reason to continue riding. Fall GoByBike weeks, the new sister event to Bike to Work & School Week that takes place in the spring, run province-wide from October 21 to November 3.

Using your bike instead of your vehicle to get around is an excellent way to:

  • Fit some physical activity into your day
  • Clear your head
  • Arrive at your destination more energized and focused
  • Do your part for the environment

Full disclosure: I’m well aware that for many of us in the North, it could be full-on winter during part of the Fall GoByBike weeks. Also full disclosure: I personally do not consider myself a winter rider, so I’m crossing my fingers that the “white stuff” holds off ! That being said, winter riding (with either studded or fat tires) is becoming an increasingly popular activity, so why not register and log a few rides?

Once again, registered participants who log at least one ride will be eligible to enter to win the grand prize of a trip for two to cycle the Baltics (not in winter conditions!). That’s pretty motivating, isn’t it?!?

Are you or have your ever been a winter rider? If so, what are some of the “must haves” to make your ride safe and enjoyable?

Gloria Fox

About Gloria Fox

Gloria Fox is the Regional Physical Activity Lead for Northern Health’s Population Health team. She is a graduate of the University of Alberta’s faculty of PE & Recreation, and until beginning this role has spent most of her career working as a Recreation Therapist with NH. She has a passion for helping others pursue an optimal leisure lifestyle and quality of life at all stages of their lives. In order to maintain her own health (and sanity), Gloria enjoys many outdoor activities, including hiking, camping, canoeing, and cycling, to name a few. She is a self-proclaimed foodie and her life’s ambition is to see as much of the world as possible.

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Regional Spirit of Healthy Kids program launches October 1

Prince George Cougar hockey players interact with school kids as part of the Spirit of Healthy Kids program.

Using local hockey players as role models, the Spirit of Healthy Kids program helps kids to be as active, kind, and as healthy as they can be. (photo credit: Prince George Cougars)

“Dad! I met the Hockey Cougars! I could win a chance to meet the whole team! I need to read and exercise every day!

These words, from a young participant in the Spirit of Healthy Kids program, sum up what makes the program successful and important: the program gives kids positive role models to look up to and rewards them for making healthy choices, and it can have a tremendous impact on their lives. Up until recently, Spirit of Healthy Kids was only available in Prince George, but now it’s going regional, to communities throughout Northern BC!

Program now available to all of Northern BC

The first ever intake for the Spirit of Healthy Kids Regional Program will be open from October 1 to October 31, 2019. Here’s how it works:

  • Interested schools in Northern BC can apply, and six schools will be selected to participate in the challenge, based on healthy kids’ projects they want to accomplish (see Criteria).
  • Students will view a video that has health, wellness, and philanthropic messages from the PG Cougars, then record their healthy activities in tracking sheets for the next two weeks.
  • At the end of the challenge, the school with the highest level of participation will receive a $5,000 grant from the program to complete a project in their school that will help students make the best possible choices every day.
  • The other competing schools will each receive a $1,000 grant.
  • Kids from schools that weren’t selected can still complete activity forms and enter a random draw for a $500 grant.

While this funding is important, the real win is getting kids to be active, kind, and as healthy as they can be. It’s no secret that building healthy habits in kids leads to healthy habits in adults. By supporting schools to encourage these habits in their students, the Prince George Cougars, the Spirit of the North Healthcare Foundation, and Northern Health aim to build a happier and healthier Northern BC for years, and generations, to come.

Spirit of Healthy Kids background

In 2015, the Prince George Cougars wanted to give back to the community. They introduced Read to Succeed, a program focused on getting elementary school children to spend more time reading and being physically active. The program was a hit and, in 2016, a new partnership between the Cougars, the Spirit of the North Healthcare Foundation, and Northern Health came together, and the Spirit of Healthy Kids program was born.

This new program built on the foundation of Read to Succeed, adding new areas of focus including philanthropy, smoke and vape reduction, and injury prevention, among others. Since the program began, over 4,100 children have participated and read their way to rewards, like enjoying Cougars hockey games.

For more information

Visit the Spirit of Healthy Kids program for more information, and application details and forms.

Andrew Steele

About Andrew Steele

Andrew Steele is the Coordinator of Community Funding Programs for Northern Health. He is passionate about community development, and believes that healthy communities are the result of many people working together toward common goals. Outside work, Andrew loves mountain biking, teaching Ride classes at The Movement, and enjoying art, culture and food with friends and family.

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Northern Health staff Ride to Conquer Cancer

Did you know that approximately 1 in 2 Canadians will develop cancer in their lifetime and that 1 in 4 will die of the disease? With these statistics in mind, you might think: what can I do about it? How can I help? What can I do to prevent this disease from starting in the first place?

For many BC cyclists, the Ride to Conquer Cancer is the answer to these questions. It’s about doing something to raise money, find wellness, and kick cancer’s butt!

The Ride to Conquer Cancer

The Ride to Conquer Cancer is a two-day cycling and fundraising event that benefits the BC Cancer Foundation and supports leading clinicians, scientists, and researchers. It spans over 200 kilometres with participants riding from Cloverdale to Hope! This year’s event took place from August 24-25, and included the Wheelin’ Warriors of the North – a team that takes part every year, and is largely made up of Northern Health (NH) staff and health care workers!

To women take a selfie, wearing their bike outfits.

Brittany (left) is an RN at the BC Cancer Centre for the North and Christine (right) is a lab technician at UHNBC. It was the first year riding in the Ride to Conquer Cancer for both of them!

Healthcare workers come together to fight cancer

Christine Plouffe (Dufresne) is a lab technician at the University Hospital of Northern BC (UHNBC). This was her first year riding:

“I joined to ride for my family, friends old and new, co-workers, high-school teachers, and classmates, as well as their families who are currently fighting, who have won [or lost] their fight … with cancer. I’m riding for all of you because I can!”

Brittany Schultz, another first year rider, is a registered nurse (RN) at the BC Cancer Centre for the North:

“I joined the team to ride this year for a few reasons. The first reason is that I’ve had several family members and close friends diagnosed with cancer, some who have sadly been defeated by this horrible disease. The second reason is that over the past four years of working at BC Cancer, I’ve been nothing short of amazed by numerous patients and their families that battle cancer with tremendous courage and strength. I see them from the day of diagnosis to the end of treatment, and I’m astounded by their resilience day after day. I want to ride to raise money towards an improved future for this disease, for my friends, family and anybody else facing cancer. The third reason I will ride is for a personal challenge, and for the chance to get to know the incredible team of Wheelin’ Warriors.”

Haylee, her mom, and dad celebrate finishing the 2019 Ride to Conquer Cancer in their bike outfits with helmets on, and arms raised.

Haylee (left) and her parents at the 2019 Ride to Conquer Cancer finish line.

As for me, this year was my fourth Ride to Conquer Cancer and it was special because I got to ride with both of my parents. It was my dad’s first time riding and he loved it!

Learn more

These are just a few of the people who made up the team. To learn more about the Ride to Conquer Cancer or the Wheelin’ Warriors of the North, please visit:

Haylee Seiter

About Haylee Seiter

Haylee is a communications advisor for Public and Population Health. She grew up in Prince George and is proud to call Northern BC home. During university she found her passion for health promotions by volunteering with the Canadian Cancer Society and became interested in marketing through the UNBC JDC West team. When she's not dreaming up communications strategies, she can be found cycling with the Wheelin Warriors or spending time with family and friends. (NH Blog Admin)

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Prince Rupert staff blaze the (Kaien Island) trail

Three Prince Rupert staff who took part in a trail run are pictured wearing running gear.

Left to right: LPN Bailey, RN Miranda Jaques, and Staffing Clerk Jessica Lindstrom.

What did you get up to this summer? Did you get a chance to get outside and enjoy beautiful Northern BC? For some Prince Rupert staff, summer plans included running in the Kaien Trails’ Trailblazer Run on August 24, 2019.

Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) Bailey, Registered Nurse (RN) Miranda Jaques, and Staffing Clerk Jessica Lindstrom all participated in the inaugural trail run, which took place on the recently restored Kaien Island Trail Network in beautiful Prince Rupert.

Good exercise? Check. Breathtaking views? Check. Supporting an awesome community event? Check!

Way to go, ladies!

To learn more about the Kaien Island Trail Network and the race, check out the video below or visit: kaientrails.ca/trailblazer.

Haylee Seiter

About Haylee Seiter

Haylee is a communications advisor for Public and Population Health. She grew up in Prince George and is proud to call Northern BC home. During university she found her passion for health promotions by volunteering with the Canadian Cancer Society and became interested in marketing through the UNBC JDC West team. When she's not dreaming up communications strategies, she can be found cycling with the Wheelin Warriors or spending time with family and friends. (NH Blog Admin)

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Wellness in the workplace: Taking the stairs is a marathon

Tanya Carter is pictured on top of a mountain in the snow. In the distance is a snowy mountain range.

Tanya Carter – conqueror of HR administrative tasks, stairs, and the Sugarbowl Mountain hike (pictured).

A couple months ago, I started a new job with Northern Health. It brought me from the fourth floor of our office building to the seventh. My new desk is near the elevator, and I noticed a lot of my floor-mates bypass the elevator doors and opt to take the stairs instead.

I also noticed that there were some gummy treats in the reception area, with a sign that said “Fuel for the stair climbers.” Naturally, I stole one of the gummies and asked, “What do you mean by stair climbers?” Tanya Carter, one of our fantastic Administrative Assistants in Human Resources, then proceeded to tell me about the stair-climbing challenge she organized.

How does the challenge work?

Basically, you’re encouraged to take the stairs instead of the elevator, and to keep track of your steps. Your steps are then entered into a spreadsheet and you can track how far you’ve gone with your stair climbing:

  • 1 mile =2,000 steps
  • 5 km = 6,200 steps
  • 10 km = 12,400 steps
  • Half marathon = 26,200 steps
  • Marathon = 52,400 steps

I thought this was a really cool idea, and after a little bit of peer pressure, I signed myself up for the 10 km. Tanya is really encouraging to those of us in the stair-climbing challenge and an advocate for fitness overall. She and I chatted about physical activity and wellness in the workplace.

A sign is pictured on the door to the seventh floor from the staircase. It says "Way to go! You made it!"

The “congrats” message that stair climbers see everyday.

Tanya, what made you want to start doing the stair-climbing challenge?

“The very first day I came to work here, I took the elevator. I thought, “what am I doing taking the elevator?” After that first day, I promised myself that I’d take the stairs and continue taking them. That was the only day that I’ve used the elevator.

“Usually when I start something, I jokingly (but kind of truthfully) want everybody else to do what I’m doing. Right off the bat, I looked forward to seeing how everybody would react to a stairs challenge. I started the challenge as a fun contest and I kind of warned everybody that I would be starting it, and some people started training for it like they would a marathon.

“When the stair-climbing challenge first started, I let everyone know that they didn’t have to do all the stairs right away. They could take the elevator to the fourth floor and then walk up to the seventh, and that’s how some people have started doing it. Just like in a real marathon, you don’t just go and do 42 kms, you start with 15 minutes and work your way up.”

How do you promote wellness in the workplace?

“That’s just who I am! I like to encourage people in a positive and healthy way. I believe that when you’re healthy, you have more confidence. You don’t have to be a certain size to be strong and healthy. Most recently, I suggested to my desk mates [that they] start an Ice Man team because they’re already starting to run a little bit.”

If someone can’t do stairs at work, how can they get some activity in during the day?

“If you aren’t working, take the stairs when you can, even for an appointment. Parking your car further away can also help get some activity in. Going for a walk is also great. [You can] encourage others to get away from their desks and go for a quick, ten-minute walk.”

Do you have any tips or tricks to stay motivated?

“For sure having a goal and just getting started. The hardest part can be getting started, and once you get going and you are in a routine, it’s the routine that keeps you going.

“[It also helps to have] someone to answer to … a partner or some friends to do an activity with. When someone is waiting for you, it makes you more inclined to be there.

“Another tip is [don’t keep] it to yourself! When you’ve actually admitted it, it makes it real and you don’t want to let people down. I have a saying, it’s not my own but I use it often, and it’s, ‘I never regret going for a run, for a bike ride, or going to cross fit – I regret not going.’ If I stay in bed and skip my run, I get up thinking I wish I would have done it.”

Outside of the workplace, what is your favorite activity to stay active?

“I like long-distance running and cross fit/strength training.”

Thanks to Tanya, I’m getting more activity in my daily routine and the 126 stairs I take to get to my desk are getting a little bit easier… just don’t call me until I’ve managed to catch my breath.

Sanja Knezevic

About Sanja Knezevic

Sanja is a communications advisor with Northern Health’s medical affairs department and is based in Prince George. She moved to Canada in 1995 from former Yugoslavia to Fort Nelson where she lived for a few years before moving to Prince George in 2000. Sanja enjoys photography, curling up with a good book, cooking and spending time with her friends and family.

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Why did you become a researcher? Learn about Chelsea Pelletier’s desire to increase physical activity for all Northerners

Chelsea presenting her work on the 2018 Physical Activity Summit at a Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research event.

Chelsea presenting her work on the 2018 Physical Activity Summit at a Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research event.

I’ve always been curious about researchers at post-secondary institutions. What made them want to get into research, and what continues to drive them? Through my role at Northern Health, I’ve been fortunate to meet multiple researchers at the University of Northern British Columbia (UNBC).

To appease my curiosity, I approached Chelsea Pelletier, Assistant Professor in the School of Health Sciences and an avid researcher at UNBC, to learn about her path to becoming a researcher and her current projects.

“During my undergraduate studies in Kinesiology at Acadia University in Nova Scotia, I was unsure what I wanted to do after graduation,” says Chelsea. “In my fourth year, I did an honours project that involved a research component. I thoroughly enjoyed the process and learning about research. My mentor encouraged me to pursue additional education and a career in research. It’s led me to where I am today.”

After graduation, Chelsea moved to Ontario where she furthered her education with McMaster University’s Master’s and Doctoral (PhD) programs in Kinesiology.

“I was interested in exercise and physical activity to manage or prevent chronic disease. My Master’s and PhD programs were an opportunity to connect with people in those fields and learn more.

“I did a post-doctoral fellowship at the Toronto Rehabilitation Institute. They help people to overcome the challenges of injury, illness, or age-related health conditions to live active, healthy lives. My supervisor ran a program for chronic disease and exercise; I learned a lot about how to work with people and community members. It inspired me to continue on this path for my research.”

In 2015, Chelsea took her talents west to Prince George to begin her career as a professor and researcher.

“Since I started at UNBC, I’ve been able to grow my research in areas that matter to communities. I spend a lot of time not only talking to community members, but listening to them. I try to let the community drive the research rather than my own interests.”

Chelsea and her two small dogs sit on a log on a sunny day.

Relaxing after a walk with dogs Blossom (L) and Cohen (R) in Salmon Valley.

Chelsea’s research mainly focuses on factors that shape physical activity for communities, understanding how to work with partners, and adding physical activity to people’s lives.

“Physical activity is an important part of being healthy. It decreases stress, improves self-esteem, gives you energy, and makes you stronger. It helps prevent chronic diseases such as obesity, heart disease, type 2 diabetes, and strokes. As we age, it becomes even more important to live an active life.”

She’s also working on a few special projects including a cardiac rehab study in Terrace, and a study with the BC Wildfire Service to learn about the impacts wildfires have on firefighters and command-centre staff.

As Chelsea’s career progresses, she continues to work with community members and partner organizations to focus on items that matter to them. All of these have an end goal of improving physical activity in the North and creating healthier communities.

Tamara Reichert

About Tamara Reichert

Tamara is the communications advisor for the innovation and development commons at Northern Health where she works on a number of projects with the research, quality improvement, clinical simulation, and education teams. Born and raised in Prince George, Tamara grew up on a ranch where she rode horses, played with farm animals, built forts, and raided the family garden. She enjoys spending time travelling, hiking, cooking, reading, and cheering for her favourite sports teams.

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Sometimes you walk, sometimes you run, sometimes… you bounce!

Four women standing in workout attire in front of an inflatable part of the Bounce Run.

We did it! (L-R) Desa, Sandy, Bonnie and I took on the challenge of the 5K Mega Bounce Run, and what fun we had!

Have you ever watched people do crazy and fun things for physical activity and think, “Man, that would be so fun, I should do that!”… and then you chicken out? You chicken out because you think you can’t do it, because you might look or feel silly, or you’re not in good enough shape to do the whole thing? Me too!

That’s always me – or I should say, that was always me. But no more. When my good friend asked me and a few other women about the 5K Mega Bounce Run, I knew that I had to do it, and I wasn’t going to chicken out this time!

Up until the morning of this amazing 5K of bouncing, sliding, climbing, rolling, and oh so much laughing with three awesome women, I’ll admit, I was trying to find a way out. Thankfully, their enthusiasm and good nature convinced me to power through my cold feet, and I did.

Lorrelle and her friends running through an inflatable obstacle course at the Mega Bounce Run.

Lorrelle and her friends participating at the Mega Bounce Run.

Good exercise was just an added bonus. For me, this was about doing something new and fun as a team of women who work together every day. Busy as we are in our work and personal lives, we took the time to hang out and go crazy for two hours on a beautiful Saturday morning! (It took some more serious athletes much less time.) We stuck together, cheered each other on, and lifted each other up (literally, at times).

Sometimes getting out of your comfort zone is the best way to find out if you enjoy something new, especially when it comes to getting active! I know now that I’ll be looking for more goofy 5Ks to conquer with my pals.

Activities like this are contagious! Now, as my friend did for me, I’m encouraging our fellow employees to join our team of “Northern Stars” to come out and bounce through a 5K with us.

Thank you to my friend Desa for introducing me to this new addiction, and to Bonnie and Sandy for making it happen. Our team is looking for competition next year. Are you up for something new?

Until then…smile and bounce on.

Lorrelle Hall

About Lorrelle Hall

Born and raised in Prince George BC, Lorrelle loves her hometown and is proud to be a PG girl, through and through! She and husband Lyn have raised twin daughters, and love being active in the community. Lorrelle works as an Executive Assistant to the Northern Health Communications team, and works closely with the Hospital Auxiliaries and Foundations. When not at work, she loves to spend time with husband, their families and friends! She loves to volunteer, and travel wherever the sun is shining and most of all hanging out with her grand fur baby Arlo!

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Youth speak out about mental health

One of the graphics used during the Youth Mental Health campaign. This one says, "How do you take care of your mental health?" There is a silhouette of the side view of a head with a plant growing in it.

We asked youth how they take care of their mental health, and they gave us thoughtful, practical, and useful tips.

We asked — you delivered! During our recent Youth Mental Health campaign (held on Northern Health’s Facebook and Instagram accounts), youth and those who care for them followed along and engaged with energy and enthusiasm. We want to share some of the great ways people are taking care of their mental health. Thanks to all who participated!

Your comments – here’s what you said about how you take care of your mental health:

Communicating

“Communicating how I’m feeling – the good, the not so good, and the downright difficult.”

“Journaling, talking, finding a therapist, daily logs.”

“Reaching out when I know it’s necessary, so I don’t stagnate in a depressed state.”

“Talk to someone – so I don’t feel alone.”

“Express myself and my emotions.”

Goal-setting and planning ahead

“Meet your obligations – regardless of how you feel.”

“I always make it to work and school on time every day. Seems small, but it makes me feel like I’m accomplishing something small every day.”

“Keeping a list of daily to-do tasks (and check them off): showers, medication, guitar, stretching.”

“Plan what I’m going to do after class, and build a routine that works for you!”

Connecting – to people, culture, nature, and animals

“Spend time with goofy people in my life, or people who are generally happy makes me feel better in the long run too.”

“Spending time with dogs — walking them brings them joy which makes me feel good. The exercise also boosts my mood even though it’s not something I like doing.”

“Keep family and friends around who I can talk with honestly and will be open with me. FaceTime, call, visit – connect however you like, but please reach out.”

“Connect to culture, pray or help those in need.”

“Having an amazing social support network that I am an equally supportive person to my friends too.”

Self-Care  

“Not put everyone else before myself. No matter how much you love your peers, you are your number one priority.”

“Make a conscious effort not to isolate.”

“Listen to your mind, body, and heart – if you feel overwhelmed or stressed, respect that or take a break if things are frustrating.”

“Look at my scars and credit myself for what I have gone through and survived. I didn’t give up and it was the best decision I ever made because I would have missed out on the best year of my life so far.”

“Validate my own feelings. What I’m feeling in the moment doesn’t define the entirety of my life or being. It’s not realistic to be happy all the time.”

“SLEEP!”

Invite activity into your day!

“Going to the gym. Exercise keeps me focused, happy and healthy. When I have a stressful day or feel pressure from university, I head to the gym to sweat it out.”

“Stretching, yoga, meditation, team sports – it all helps.”

“Listen to calming music, practice gratitude, draw, read, write, go for a drive, take a bath.”

“Get a new hobby.”

“Cleaning and organizing (a drawer, bathroom, inside of car).”

Treatment/Recovery Work

“Visiting my psychiatrist, therapist, clinician regularly.”

“Mood tracking and keeping thoughts positive.”

“Sticking to my recovery plan (medication regime, activity, sleep, social connections).”

“Taking my medication at a designated time every day to make sure I don’t forget.”

“Keep a journal or notebook so I can keep track of symptoms and possible triggers.”

“Be aware of mood and warning signs of relapse so I am able to take a step back and use some of my tools before it gets worse.”

Other bits of wisdom:

“Different things work for different people.”

“Remember that other people care.”

“Spend time with people who uplift you.”

“Over the years, I’ve tried everything to “fix” myself. I have changed my perspective and realized I don’t need fixing. I was just sick, but not in a way that is easy to diagnose or explain to a friend. After I accepted my mental illness, I retried some of the strategies such as journaling, being more active whether that be walking my dog or going to the gym, eating better and sticking to a routine.”

“Limit screen time.”

The campaign’s toolkit can be found on our website.

Stacie Weich

About Stacie Weich

Stacie Weich is the Regional Mental Wellness and Prevention of Substance Harms Lead for Northern Health’s Population Health team. A passion for people and wellness has driven her to pursue a career in mental health and substance use. The first 10 years of her career were spent at a non-profit in Quesnel. Shen then moved to Prince George to join Northern Health in 2008. Stacie has fulfilled many roles under the mental health and substance use umbrella since then (EPI, ED, NYTC, COAST, AADP, YCOS). In her off time Stacie enjoys spending time with her husband, two daughters, and two dogs, and other family and friends in beautiful northern BC!

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Preventing child falls in the home and at play

Children play on a net at a playground.

Summer is a great time of year to think about how to prevent child falls in the home and outdoors.

Did you know that falls are the leading cause of injury in BC children from birth to 14 years old?

I’m a parent and a nurse. Like all parents and caregivers, I want to keep my kids safe while allowing them to have fun and be physically active. I’m always amazed by how quickly children’s skills and abilities can change as they develop from one stage to the next. You can never be sure what they might get up to next!

Falls are a normal part of child development

Children are naturally curious, and they learn by playing and exploring in their environments. Falls and tumbles are a normal part of child development, and many falls result in no more than a minor scrape or bruise. Still, each year, more than 140,000 children are seen in emergency departments across Canada for more serious fall-related injuries.

Preventing serious fall-related injuries

Summer is a great time to think about how to prevent child falls in the home and outdoors. As temperatures rise, many of us open our windows to let in the warm, fresh air. For children under five years old, injuries often happen in the home and involve a fall from furniture, stairs, or a window.

Creating a child-friendly home

Children have large heads compared to the rest of their body. This affects their balance and puts them at risk of getting a head injury from a fall.

For information on how to create a child-friendly home, check out Home safety: Around the house from Parachute. There’s also information about head injuries on the Northern Health’s concussion page.

A child's feet are near the edge of a platform on a playground.

Each year, more than 140,000 children are seen in emergency departments across Canada for serious fall-related injuries.

Don’t let a preventable injury ruin your family’s outdoor summer fun

The sunny weather also draws families outdoors to enjoy activities such as biking, swimming, or going to the playground. Don’t let a preventable injury ruin your family’s outdoor summer fun! Parachute is a great online resource for injury prevention information.

Here are some easy precautions that Parachute suggests parents and caregivers take to prevent serious falls and help kids stay safe:

  • Use window stops and keep balcony doors locked.
  • Use stair gates in your home.
  • Place all furniture away from windows and balcony door handles.
  • Make sure playground equipment has barriers, is properly anchored and in good condition, and has a deep, soft surface.
  • Practise active supervision while still giving your child the chance to explore and develop.

More information

Dana Vigneault

About Dana Vigneault

Dana has worked in Public Health since 2007. She joined the Population Health team in 2018, as a Regional Nursing Lead for Injury Prevention. She is excited to be engaged in upstream initiatives, focused on preventing injuries and promoting healthy communities. Dana lives in Terrace with her husband and two children and enjoys spending time in the garden, at the lake and in the mountains.

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Lisa Davison: Community Health Star

The Northern Health Community Health Stars program shines a light on community members across Northern BC who are doing exceptional work, on their own time, to promote health and wellness in their community. One such person is Lisa Davison, a trail blazer in Prince George for the sport of badminton! Here’s her story.

Lisa tosses a birdie in a gymnasium as a group of young students watches.

Coach Lisa working with students.

Congratulations! You were nominated to be a Community Health Star by Vanessa Carlson! What’s your connection with Vanessa?

Vanessa is a past player in PG’s annual event, and now a friend, who lived in Watson Lake! For about six or seven years, her father would have her and her brother, Jason, come down to our camps and tournaments. I was in contact with the Carlsons on and off during those years, and eventually her father asked me to lead a camp in the Yukon to help them prep for the 2011 Western Canada Summer Games. They flew me up and we held a camp for a week, it was really special.

After that, I saw her and the Yukon team in Kamloops, where I was actually the manager for the BC team. It was pretty funny to see their team (one I had just trained and gotten close with) play, as I managed the BC team. The camaraderie was really great.

Why do you think Vanessa nominated you? What does it feel like to get that sort of recognition from a peer?

It feels amazing to be nominated, especially by Vanessa because she and her family are such amazing people – they’re a really neat bunch.

We keep in touch on Facebook but honestly, this is sort of out of the blue! Vanessa has always been very appreciative of me trying to grow the sport, [telling me], “You’re such an amazing supporter of badminton, way to go!” I’ve always enjoyed hearing that, because I know she’s being sincere, and it’s gratifying to be recognized for something that I’ve put a lot of time and effort into. She was one of the first people to connect with me after I broke the news that I had decided to hang up my high school coaching hat after 16 years, and she was one of the first to congratulate me on winning the Sport BC Community Sport Hero Award.

When you do a lot of volunteer work, you do it for the love of the sport, the kids, and to grow the game. And then, when you feel like “Ahh, I’m going to turn it in…” something amazing happens. A kid sees the light at the end of the tunnel, or you get a Vanessa that says, “Good job!” It keeps sparking you.

On a podium, several people high-five, while two young women hold a plaque.

Lisa and others celebrate a victory.

How did you get into badminton?

Well, that’s a funny story… I was in grade 9 at Kelly Road Secondary School in Prince George, and in the fall my friends kept disappearing after classes. When I asked them what they were up to, they told me that they were playing badminton, and that there was a tournament coming up at the end of the month and, “You should come play.”

I actually had never played badminton before – not even in the backyard! I wound up playing in the tournament and absolutely loved it. So from grade 10 and on, that was it. I was all in on badminton.

What made you want to coach and where did you start?

I was working at Prince George Secondary School in 1993, and I got a phone call from a parent [of a student] who lived in Fort St. John. She mentioned that she’d heard I might be interested in coaching badminton. At that point, I had helped out in some P.E. classes, had some drop-in after school practices here and there, so somewhere someone had made the connection between me and badminton, but I had never coached anyone. I informed the caller that I had no coaching certificates, but I’d give it a try. I had some skills that I could pass on, but I recognized that there was a lot more I had to learn from a coaching perspective.

That student was the start of my coaching life, and I knew that to help him more, I had to learn more. I took communication courses at the college, gradually started setting up classes, and my coaching career grew from there!

How did you start the North Central Badminton Academy in Prince George?

Some years into coaching high school, I started to notice that players quit after they graduated, because there was nowhere to continue competing. In 2000, I started coaching at Heather Park Middle School and some of the grade 8s were able to participate in the high school season at Kelly Road. It was noticeable that many kids were disappointed there was no badminton after the high school season. They had nowhere to practice or continue competing.

I had no idea what to do or how to do it, so I called Badminton BC, and told them that I wanted to start something. After that call, I began to organize visits from high level coaches that lived elsewhere, put on tournaments, and train groups of students. The North Central Badminton Academy was born and I have been happy to see it grow ever since.

Vanessa mentioned that you’ve developed a program that caters to all members of the community, regardless of experience/fitness levels and age. Tell us about that.

There are so many facets to badminton, and it plays into how someone can organize players and create a program that everyone has a place in. There’s the hand-eye component, the physical component, the game sense, and, of course, their age!

I found I had to create beginner programs, intermediate programs, high performance or development squad programs, but also programs for girls and ladies only, and para-athletes. I really enjoy the long term athlete development, and when you have each of these programs running, you get to see players grow, which is awesome.

Any plans for the immediate future?

I would love to take a group to Denmark. There’s amazing badminton over there, and it would be my total coup de grace as I slow things down!

Prince George is also hosting the 2020 Canadian Masters Badminton Championship, which will be great for the sport in Northern BC. I’m not very good at staying stagnant, there’s always pieces in motion! 

Congratulations Lisa!

Thank you Lisa! For all the countless hours of volunteering, and the energy you’ve put into growing the sport of badminton, Northern Health recognizes your efforts and commends you for getting the north moving with the sport of badminton. You truly are a Community Health Star!

To nominate a Community Health Star in your community, visit the Northern Health Community Health Stars page today!

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