Healthy Living in the North

Preventing child falls in the home and at play

Children play on a net at a playground.

Summer is a great time of year to think about how to prevent child falls in the home and outdoors.

Did you know that falls are the leading cause of injury in BC children from birth to 14 years old?

I’m a parent and a nurse. Like all parents and caregivers, I want to keep my kids safe while allowing them to have fun and be physically active. I’m always amazed by how quickly children’s skills and abilities can change as they develop from one stage to the next. You can never be sure what they might get up to next!

Falls are a normal part of child development

Children are naturally curious, and they learn by playing and exploring in their environments. Falls and tumbles are a normal part of child development, and many falls result in no more than a minor scrape or bruise. Still, each year, more than 140,000 children are seen in emergency departments across Canada for more serious fall-related injuries.

Preventing serious fall-related injuries

Summer is a great time to think about how to prevent child falls in the home and outdoors. As temperatures rise, many of us open our windows to let in the warm, fresh air. For children under five years old, injuries often happen in the home and involve a fall from furniture, stairs, or a window.

Creating a child-friendly home

Children have large heads compared to the rest of their body. This affects their balance and puts them at risk of getting a head injury from a fall.

For information on how to create a child-friendly home, check out Home safety: Around the house from Parachute. There’s also information about head injuries on the Northern Health’s concussion page.

A child's feet are near the edge of a platform on a playground.

Each year, more than 140,000 children are seen in emergency departments across Canada for serious fall-related injuries.

Don’t let a preventable injury ruin your family’s outdoor summer fun

The sunny weather also draws families outdoors to enjoy activities such as biking, swimming, or going to the playground. Don’t let a preventable injury ruin your family’s outdoor summer fun! Parachute is a great online resource for injury prevention information.

Here are some easy precautions that Parachute suggests parents and caregivers take to prevent serious falls and help kids stay safe:

  • Use window stops and keep balcony doors locked.
  • Use stair gates in your home.
  • Place all furniture away from windows and balcony door handles.
  • Make sure playground equipment has barriers, is properly anchored and in good condition, and has a deep, soft surface.
  • Practise active supervision while still giving your child the chance to explore and develop.

More information

Dana Vigneault

About Dana Vigneault

Dana has worked in Public Health since 2007. She joined the Population Health team in 2018, as a Regional Nursing Lead for Injury Prevention. She is excited to be engaged in upstream initiatives, focused on preventing injuries and promoting healthy communities. Dana lives in Terrace with her husband and two children and enjoys spending time in the garden, at the lake and in the mountains.

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Lisa Davison: Community Health Star

The Northern Health Community Health Stars program shines a light on community members across Northern BC who are doing exceptional work, on their own time, to promote health and wellness in their community. One such person is Lisa Davison, a trail blazer in Prince George for the sport of badminton! Here’s her story.

Lisa tosses a birdie in a gymnasium as a group of young students watches.

Coach Lisa working with students.

Congratulations! You were nominated to be a Community Health Star by Vanessa Carlson! What’s your connection with Vanessa?

Vanessa is a past player in PG’s annual event, and now a friend, who lived in Watson Lake! For about six or seven years, her father would have her and her brother, Jason, come down to our camps and tournaments. I was in contact with the Carlsons on and off during those years, and eventually her father asked me to lead a camp in the Yukon to help them prep for the 2011 Western Canada Summer Games. They flew me up and we held a camp for a week, it was really special.

After that, I saw her and the Yukon team in Kamloops, where I was actually the manager for the BC team. It was pretty funny to see their team (one I had just trained and gotten close with) play, as I managed the BC team. The camaraderie was really great.

Why do you think Vanessa nominated you? What does it feel like to get that sort of recognition from a peer?

It feels amazing to be nominated, especially by Vanessa because she and her family are such amazing people – they’re a really neat bunch.

We keep in touch on Facebook but honestly, this is sort of out of the blue! Vanessa has always been very appreciative of me trying to grow the sport, [telling me], “You’re such an amazing supporter of badminton, way to go!” I’ve always enjoyed hearing that, because I know she’s being sincere, and it’s gratifying to be recognized for something that I’ve put a lot of time and effort into. She was one of the first people to connect with me after I broke the news that I had decided to hang up my high school coaching hat after 16 years, and she was one of the first to congratulate me on winning the Sport BC Community Sport Hero Award.

When you do a lot of volunteer work, you do it for the love of the sport, the kids, and to grow the game. And then, when you feel like “Ahh, I’m going to turn it in…” something amazing happens. A kid sees the light at the end of the tunnel, or you get a Vanessa that says, “Good job!” It keeps sparking you.

On a podium, several people high-five, while two young women hold a plaque.

Lisa and others celebrate a victory.

How did you get into badminton?

Well, that’s a funny story… I was in grade 9 at Kelly Road Secondary School in Prince George, and in the fall my friends kept disappearing after classes. When I asked them what they were up to, they told me that they were playing badminton, and that there was a tournament coming up at the end of the month and, “You should come play.”

I actually had never played badminton before – not even in the backyard! I wound up playing in the tournament and absolutely loved it. So from grade 10 and on, that was it. I was all in on badminton.

What made you want to coach and where did you start?

I was working at Prince George Secondary School in 1993, and I got a phone call from a parent [of a student] who lived in Fort St. John. She mentioned that she’d heard I might be interested in coaching badminton. At that point, I had helped out in some P.E. classes, had some drop-in after school practices here and there, so somewhere someone had made the connection between me and badminton, but I had never coached anyone. I informed the caller that I had no coaching certificates, but I’d give it a try. I had some skills that I could pass on, but I recognized that there was a lot more I had to learn from a coaching perspective.

That student was the start of my coaching life, and I knew that to help him more, I had to learn more. I took communication courses at the college, gradually started setting up classes, and my coaching career grew from there!

How did you start the North Central Badminton Academy in Prince George?

Some years into coaching high school, I started to notice that players quit after they graduated, because there was nowhere to continue competing. In 2000, I started coaching at Heather Park Middle School and some of the grade 8s were able to participate in the high school season at Kelly Road. It was noticeable that many kids were disappointed there was no badminton after the high school season. They had nowhere to practice or continue competing.

I had no idea what to do or how to do it, so I called Badminton BC, and told them that I wanted to start something. After that call, I began to organize visits from high level coaches that lived elsewhere, put on tournaments, and train groups of students. The North Central Badminton Academy was born and I have been happy to see it grow ever since.

Vanessa mentioned that you’ve developed a program that caters to all members of the community, regardless of experience/fitness levels and age. Tell us about that.

There are so many facets to badminton, and it plays into how someone can organize players and create a program that everyone has a place in. There’s the hand-eye component, the physical component, the game sense, and, of course, their age!

I found I had to create beginner programs, intermediate programs, high performance or development squad programs, but also programs for girls and ladies only, and para-athletes. I really enjoy the long term athlete development, and when you have each of these programs running, you get to see players grow, which is awesome.

Any plans for the immediate future?

I would love to take a group to Denmark. There’s amazing badminton over there, and it would be my total coup de grace as I slow things down!

Prince George is also hosting the 2020 Canadian Masters Badminton Championship, which will be great for the sport in Northern BC. I’m not very good at staying stagnant, there’s always pieces in motion! 

Congratulations Lisa!

Thank you Lisa! For all the countless hours of volunteering, and the energy you’ve put into growing the sport of badminton, Northern Health recognizes your efforts and commends you for getting the north moving with the sport of badminton. You truly are a Community Health Star!

To nominate a Community Health Star in your community, visit the Northern Health Community Health Stars page today!

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Sedentary Behaviours – They’re not all created equal!

The sun sets over water in the distance. The sky is blue and gold punctuated by clouds. In the foreground, a silhouette watches the beautiful scene.

Some sedentary behaviours are good for your well-being, like taking in a soothing sunset.

The new smoking.” Sedentary time (time spent in a sitting or lying position while expending very little energy) has come under fire for its negative health effects lately. While there are certainly significant health risks associated with time spent being sedentary, calling it “the new smoking” is a bit of a scare tactic – smoking is still riskier.

At this point, you might be starting to doubt my intentions. After all, my job is to promote increased physical activity and decreased sedentary behaviour in the name of better health. Fear not! I’ll get there yet.

The World Health Organization (WHO) recently released guidelines on physical activity, sedentary behaviour and sleep for children under five years of age:

This is really exciting because the WHO took the evidence used in the development of the Canadian 24-Hour Movement Guidelines for the Early Years (0-4), reviewed more evidence, and reinforced these main messages:

  • Kids need to get a good amount and variety of physical activity each day.
    • For those under one year, being active several times a day including floor-based play and tummy time.
    • For kids between one to two years of age, at least three hours at any intensity throughout the day.
    • For kids between three to four years of age, at least three hours, including at least one hour of higher intensity activity throughout the day.
  • Kids need to get enough – and good quality – sleep!
    • For those under one year, the recommendation is 12-17 hours including naps.
    • For ages one to two, 11-14 hours.
    • For ages three to four, 10-13 hours.
  • Kids need to spend less (or limited) time being restrained and sitting in front of screens.
    • Translation? Not being stuck in a stroller or car seat for more than one hour at a time. Screen time isn’t recommended for children under two years, and it’s recommended to limit sedentary screen time to no more than one hour for kids aged between two and four.

Here’s what I really appreciate about this last part, and what I think actually applies to all ages: the recommendation is to replace restrained and sedentary screen time with more physical activity, while still ensuring a good quality sleep. However, it doesn’t tell us to avoid all sedentary time completely. In fact, this concept recognizes that there are a number of sedentary activities (particularly in the early, developmental years, but also for all ages) that are very valuable from a holistic wellness perspective.

For children, these higher quality sedentary activities include quiet play, reading, creative storytelling and interacting with caregivers, etc. For adults, things like reading a book, creating something, making music, or working on a puzzle can contribute to our overall wellness by expanding our minds and focusing on something positive.

So, what I’m saying is this: yes, for the sake of our health, we need to sit less and move more. However, not all sedentary behaviours are terrible or need to be eliminated completely. Generally, the sedentary behaviours that we, as a society, need to get a handle on are the ones involving staring at screens and numbing our brains. This is not to say that we should never watch TV or movies, or scroll through social media; we just need to be mindful of it, and try to swap out some of these activities in favour of moving our bodies more. We need to recognize the difference between those sedentary activities that leave you feeling sluggish and dull versus those that leave you inspired and peaceful. Do less of what dulls you, and more of what inspires you, for a balanced, healthy life!

Gloria Fox

About Gloria Fox

Gloria Fox is the Regional Physical Activity Lead for Northern Health’s Population Health team. She is a graduate of the University of Alberta’s faculty of PE & Recreation, and until beginning this role has spent most of her career working as a Recreation Therapist with NH. She has a passion for helping others pursue an optimal leisure lifestyle and quality of life at all stages of their lives. In order to maintain her own health (and sanity), Gloria enjoys many outdoor activities, including hiking, camping, canoeing, and cycling, to name a few. She is a self-proclaimed foodie and her life’s ambition is to see as much of the world as possible.

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Meet our Northern biking champions: Anna from Mackenzie

A woman standing astride her bike on the side of the road. The bike is towing a child trailer with a child wearing a helmet sitting side.

Anna is sporting her studded winter bike tires and chariot, which help her and her daughter get around town safely.

For Bike to Work & School Week (May 27-June 2), we are featuring a number of community members who are champions for cycling, whether it be to work, school, or commuting around town.

Today we’ll meet Anna Kandola, a Dietitian and Kinesiologist in Mackenzie.

Why do you bike to work and what do you like most about it?

We decided it would be a good option instead of having a second car – better for health, finances and the environment. It wakes me up and gives me more energy through the day to have had a bit of activity in the morning!

What do you think your community needs in order to make it easier for more people to bike to work OR school?

More bike racks available in the winter.

Any biking tips you’d like to share?

I have studded tires for winter riding which seem to help a lot. The chariot makes it so we can transport our daughter easily, so I can’t use her as an excuse not to bike.

***

A big thank you to Anna for sharing some ideas on how to make biking an easier option year-round!

Are you a winter cyclist? Please share your tips and tricks with us for staying safe, warm, and dry on two wheels!

 

Gloria Fox

About Gloria Fox

Gloria Fox is the Regional Physical Activity Lead for Northern Health’s Population Health team. She is a graduate of the University of Alberta’s faculty of PE & Recreation, and until beginning this role has spent most of her career working as a Recreation Therapist with NH. She has a passion for helping others pursue an optimal leisure lifestyle and quality of life at all stages of their lives. In order to maintain her own health (and sanity), Gloria enjoys many outdoor activities, including hiking, camping, canoeing, and cycling, to name a few. She is a self-proclaimed foodie and her life’s ambition is to see as much of the world as possible.

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Meet our Northern biking champions: Mattie from Mackenzie

A young girl, wearing a black and pink hoodie, poses with her red bike and helmet.

Mattie would like to thank her mom for lending out her bike until Mattie can get a new one…”Thanks, Mom!”

For Bike to Work & School Week (May 27-June 2), we are featuring a number of community members who are champions for cycling, whether it be to work, school, or commuting around town.

Today we’ll meet Mattie Ludvigson, a grade 7 student at Mackenzie Secondary School.

Why do you bike to school?

I used to walk because I lived so close to the elementary school. Now that I go to the high school, I bike because it’s a bit further away, and biking takes less time. Plus, I know some short cuts!!

What do you like most about biking?

I like that I can meet up with friends and bike with them!

What do you think your community needs in order to make it easier for more people to bike to work or school?

Something to encourage them more (both adults and kids)… maybe a reward of some type given out randomly?!

Any bike tips you’d like to share?

The best place to ride your bike is when you are out camping… you must ALWAYS remember to pack your bike… then go make your own trails!

***

Thanks, Mattie, for sharing your reasons and motivation for riding your bike!

What kind of incentives do you think would work to get more people riding in your community? We’d love to hear from you!

Gloria Fox

About Gloria Fox

Gloria Fox is the Regional Physical Activity Lead for Northern Health’s Population Health team. She is a graduate of the University of Alberta’s faculty of PE & Recreation, and until beginning this role has spent most of her career working as a Recreation Therapist with NH. She has a passion for helping others pursue an optimal leisure lifestyle and quality of life at all stages of their lives. In order to maintain her own health (and sanity), Gloria enjoys many outdoor activities, including hiking, camping, canoeing, and cycling, to name a few. She is a self-proclaimed foodie and her life’s ambition is to see as much of the world as possible.

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Meet our Northern biking champions: Esther from Mackenzie!

Two youth posing with their bikes.

Esther says that “biking is a healthy activity…it’s good for ALL of your body,” and her friend & biking buddy Charlotte agrees!

For Bike to Work & School Week (May 27-June 2, 2019), we are featuring a number of community members who are champions for cycling, whether it be to work, school, or commuting around town.

Today we’ll meet Esther McIntyre, a grade 6 student at Morfee Elementary.

Why do you bike to school and what do you like best about biking?

It’s the fastest way to get to school! I think it’s a safer form of transportation than driving (beyond the fact that I’m in grade 6 and can’t drive!). Visibility is better – both people being able to see YOU biking with your helmet on, and you can see everything that’s going on around you when you are biking, more than you would see in a car.

What do you think your community needs in order to make it easier for more people to bike to work OR school?

We could use a few more bike racks in town, and some more sidewalks for the young bikers to bike on safely.

What type of bike do you ride?

My mom’s as I grew out of mine. I’d like to get a mountain bike.

Any biking tips you’d like to share?

An important thing for safe biking is to be aware of your strengths and limitations, and it’s good to know what gears you feel comfortable riding in.

***

A big thank you to Esther for sharing some really helpful insights, and a shout out to Moe Hopkins, NH Support Worker, for connecting with Esther!

If you haven’t participated in Bike to Work & School Week before, why not make this your year? We’d love to hear about your experiences riding in your home community.

Gloria Fox

About Gloria Fox

Gloria Fox is the Regional Physical Activity Lead for Northern Health’s Population Health team. She is a graduate of the University of Alberta’s faculty of PE & Recreation, and until beginning this role has spent most of her career working as a Recreation Therapist with NH. She has a passion for helping others pursue an optimal leisure lifestyle and quality of life at all stages of their lives. In order to maintain her own health (and sanity), Gloria enjoys many outdoor activities, including hiking, camping, canoeing, and cycling, to name a few. She is a self-proclaimed foodie and her life’s ambition is to see as much of the world as possible.

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Meet our Northern biking champions: Barb from Mackenzie!

Barb Paterson, smiling in a yellow reflective biking jacket, and riding a bike.

Barb is a champion for students by assisting with the Bike to School events at Morfee Elementary School. Learn more about bike to school and work week at www.biketowork.ca

For Bike to Work & School Week (May 27-June 2), we will be featuring a number of community members who are champions for cycling, whether it be to work, school, or commuting around town.

Today we’ll meet Barb Paterson, a retired nurse from Mackenzie.

Why do you ride?

I love to bike. I am retired but have always liked biking, so I try to bike as often as I can. I like biking because I love how you can go anywhere, and I like the exercise.

What do you think your community needs in order to make it easier for more people to bike to work OR school?

We just need to keep working with the GoByBike [Society] and grow the profile of biking in town. It seems to be increasing the number of kids on bicycles in Mackenzie!

What do you ride?

I ride a custom built Santa Cruz that Phil Evanson in Prince George creatively built by mixing and matching bike parts and components. I love it. He rounded up everything I wanted in a bike and put it together for me.

Any biking tips you’d like to share?

It amazes me how often I see parents cycling with their children, where the kids have helmets on but not the adults! Parents: protect YOUR brains too and set a good example for your children by wearing your helmet when you’re biking!

***

Shout out to Moe Hopkins, NH Support Worker & Community Champion herself, for seeking out and interviewing Barb!

It’s not too late to participate in Bike to Work & School week – register now and log at least one ride to be eligible to win the grand prize of a cycling adventure for two in Italy!

Gloria Fox

About Gloria Fox

Gloria Fox is the Regional Physical Activity Lead for Northern Health’s Population Health team. She is a graduate of the University of Alberta’s faculty of PE & Recreation, and until beginning this role has spent most of her career working as a Recreation Therapist with NH. She has a passion for helping others pursue an optimal leisure lifestyle and quality of life at all stages of their lives. In order to maintain her own health (and sanity), Gloria enjoys many outdoor activities, including hiking, camping, canoeing, and cycling, to name a few. She is a self-proclaimed foodie and her life’s ambition is to see as much of the world as possible.

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IMAGINE grant: Discover Daycare

The outdoor play equipment and safety surface at the Discovery Childcare Centre.

It’s no secret that active outdoor play is important for children. In a recent paper on the benefits of outdoor active play, the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario and their partners state that kids who are outside move more and sit less, which contributes to a wide variety of health benefits.

The importance of outdoor play was clear to the Discovery Childcare Centre in Prince Rupert, but they just didn’t have the equipment to support that active play outdoors. And so, when the Board of Directors for the centre identified a new playground as a priority, they turned to the IMAGINE Community Grants program to help make the vision a reality.

More of the outdoor play equipment at the Discovery Childcare Centre.

Through years of focused effort, the daycare fundraised almost $40,000 to put toward the purchase and installation of new playground equipment for the 32 kids in their care. Their efforts took dedication and commitment, and in fall 2017 they were very close to achieving their goal!

However, one key piece remained: site preparation, including the purchase and installation of Playfall Tile, a rubberized safety surface manufactured from recycled tires that would cushion the inevitable falls of the hundreds of children who would enjoy the equipment over the years.  The quote for this work came in at roughly $5,000, and so the Board approved the submission of an application for an IMAGINE grant. The application was approved in spring 2018 and work began in June.

After its completion in August 2018, the new playground was an immediate hit with the kids attending the centre. Having a safe place to play outside, and the right equipment for that play, made a big difference for everyone. The centre has already observed that there is room for more growth in the future, with a key focus being the development of a garden area near the playground that will let kids learn about planting, growing, and eating fresh food. IMAGINE is proud to have contributed to this amazing project, and look forward to hearing about the centre’s successes in the future!

The IMAGINE Grant spring cycle is now accepting applications! Get yours in today!

Andrew Steele

About Andrew Steele

Andrew Steele is the Coordinator of Community Funding Programs for Northern Health. He is passionate about community development, and believes that healthy communities are the result of many people working together toward common goals. Outside work, Andrew loves mountain biking, teaching Ride classes at The Movement, and enjoying art, culture and food with friends and family.

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IMAGINE Grant: Trail Blazers

Riding a bike is one of those experiences that most people associate with being a kid, but the truth is many kids don’t get the chance to have that experience. The cost of buying a bike is a major barrier for some families, and additional costs like helmets and maintenance can put the activity out of reach. Many students at Westwood Elementary School in Prince George are among those not fortunate enough to own a bike, and this motivated a teacher, Tanja Wilson, to apply for an IMAGINE Community Grant to start the Trail Blazers program at the school.

Westwood school kids on bikes.

“I saw the need for some of our youth to be able to enjoy bike riding, and I wanted to incorporate it into an after school program so that everyone could join,” says Wilson. “I wanted to help kids learn not only how to ride a bike, but also safety rules and basic bike fixes such as how to put a chain back on, and how to lower a seat.” 

With funding in place, Tanja first set out to purchase the equipment: 25 bikes, 25 helmets, and 25 sets of pads, in sizes to accommodate students of all ages. She then arranged lessons about bike safety and maintenance for the kids, including hand signals, crossing roads, and how to replace a broken chain. Once this was completed, it was ride time.

“It was FANTASTIC!! Not only did the students enjoy it, their parents did as well.”

The program ran twice a week for primary students and twice for intermediates. The route between Westwood Elementary and nearby Ginters Park quickly became a fan favourite. At the park, the kids explored trails and were able to enjoy a healthy snack before riding back to school!

The program was a hit, seeing huge growth in participation over time and giving many students the opportunity to engage in fun, healthy, and safe physical activity with their friends.

All kids should have the chance to play, but sometimes barriers they can’t control get in the way. By supporting projects like Trail Blazers, the IMAGINE Community Grants program helps break these barriers down, one ride at a time. The Spring 2019 IMAGINE intake opens to applications on March 1, 2019, with applications due March 31. For more information, visit the IMAGINE Community Grants web page.

Andrew Steele

About Andrew Steele

Andrew Steele is the Coordinator of Community Funding Programs for Northern Health. He is passionate about community development, and believes that healthy communities are the result of many people working together toward common goals. Outside work, Andrew loves mountain biking, teaching Ride classes at The Movement, and enjoying art, culture and food with friends and family.

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Adulting 101: Running safely in winter

Haylee in her winter running gear.

What comes next after learning to “adult” and walk safely? Why, running of course! Until recently I would’ve never considered going for a run at night in the winter. Why would I leave my warm house to gallivant in the snow and ice? One of my goals is to do a triathlon so I decided I needed to break it down and work on one piece of it: you guessed it – running!

So there I found myself: running outside in the winter. I realized that contrary to my old beliefs, life and being physically active doesn’t stop because it’s winter! I’ll admit the cold and darkness didn’t encourage me to jump out the door, but I do know I felt really good once I was out there. In fact, there was a whole group of us that felt pretty darn good in the snow! I decided to join one of my local running groups, the PG Road Runners, for a Wednesday night group run and even made some friends while tromping through the slush. Other perks: I learned snow is weirdly satisfying to crunch under my feet and I got a much needed dose of vitamin N (nature!) from being outside! Plus, it was fun to try something new and I felt so good after!

Are you interested in taking the icy plunge and running outside this winter? Here are five things I recommend for winter running.

Five tips for winter running:

A selection of gear for winter running.
  1. Stay safe and wear reflective gear! Making sure you’re seen is really important when out running in the dark. Nearly half of all crashes with pedestrians happen in the fall and winter due to the dark and low visibility! Leave the all-black clothing at home and stay safe by wearing bright, reflective gear!
  2. Get a grip. My biggest worry about running in the winter was slipping and falling. I’d heard that wearing ice grippers over your running shoes could help, and when I showed up to my running group, everyone was wearing them! I tried running in them and felt much more sure-footed. That said, you still need to be very careful and watch your step! I thought they might be uncomfortable but they were barely noticeable for me. If you do get a pair, I’d recommend them for walking too!
  3. Light your way. I didn’t have a headlamp for my first winter night run and I wish I did! I thought the street lamps would do the trick but I didn’t account for the dark spots between the street lamps. Oops. I picked one up for my next night run and it made a huge difference being able to see where I was stepping. If you do decide to invest, you could use it for other winter activities like snowshoeing!
  4. Don’t get cold feet. Thanks to the freeze and thaw weather in Prince George lately, I ran through a lot of slush puddles. My feet were wet but they stayed warm thanks to my wool socks. Unlike cotton, wool helps trap heat and keep it close to your body so you stay warm. I’d highly recommend a pair.   
  5. Dress lighter than the weather feels – I learned this the hard way. It gets hot when running! I didn’t check the weather before my first run, dressed too warm and overheated halfway through. Make sure you check the weather before you go and then choose your layers accordingly.   

As an amateur runner I’m probably just skimming the surface when it comes to advice. Are you part of a running group? Do you have any winter running tips? Leave your comments below! Stay safe and happy running!

Haylee Seiter

About Haylee Seiter

Haylee is a communications advisor for Public and Population Health. She grew up in Prince George and is proud to call Northern BC home. During university she found her passion for health promotions by volunteering with the Canadian Cancer Society and became interested in marketing through the UNBC JDC West team. When she's not dreaming up communications strategies, she can be found cycling with the Wheelin Warriors or spending time with family and friends. (NH Blog Admin)

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