Healthy Living in the North

Local physician recognized for an innovative workplace culture

Garry Knoll standing in front of a lake in the woods.

Dr. Garry Knoll was recently recognized by the BC Patient Safety & Quality Council with the Quality Culture Trailblazer Award.

Local Prince George family physician Dr. Garry Knoll was recently honoured by the BC Patient Safety & Quality Council, winning an award for Quality Culture Trailblazer. Dr. Knoll is the President, Board Chair, and Physician Lead of the Prince George Division of Family Practice, and has been a family physician for over 35 years. He was recognized for creating a culture of quality improvement where staff are empowered and encouraged to innovate.

He has transformed care in Prince George by helping implement a renowned practice coaching program, championing team-based care and primary care homes, and supporting physician recruitment and retention. He is a leader, role model and mentor to many, caring for his patients in the hospital, visiting long-term care patients, and providing palliative care in his practice and at the Prince George Hospice House.

Dr. Knoll mentors new family physicians in Prince George through his role as a clinical assistant professor with the UBC Family Medicine Residency Program, where he is known for emphasizing the importance of person-centred care, and by recruiting them to join his practice.

Although he is nearing retirement, Dr. Knoll continues to work tirelessly to improve care practices, ensuring the legacy of his work will inspire health care providers in years to come. He will receive his award February 2019 during a reception at the Quality Forum 2019 in Vancouver.

Tamara Reichert

About Tamara Reichert

Tamara is the communications advisor for the innovation and development commons at Northern Health where she works on a number of projects with the research, quality improvement, clinical simulation, and education teams. Born and raised in Prince George, Tamara grew up on a ranch where she rode horses, played with farm animals, built forts, and raided the family garden. She enjoys spending time travelling, hiking, cooking, reading, and cheering for her favourite sports teams.

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Tumbler Ridge physician makes 33rd appearance in long-running journal feature

Canadian Journal of Rural Medicine cover, in which Dr. Helm has an article.Dr. Charles Helm, who practices in Tumbler Ridge in Northern BC, is the author of “Country Cardiograms case 64” in the Canadian Journal of Rural Medicine’s Fall 2018 issue. The recurring feature presents an electrocardiogram and invites readers to make a diagnosis, letting readers pit their skills against those of the physician author. This is Dr. Helm’s 33rd publication under “Country Cardiograms” — congratulations to Dr. Helm!

Anne Scott

About Anne Scott

Anne is a communications officer at Northern Health; she lives in Prince George with her husband Andrew Watkinson. Her current health goals are to do a pull-up and more than one consecutive “real” push-up. She also dreams of becoming a master’s level competitive sprinter and finding a publisher for her children’s book on colourblindness. Anne enjoys cycling, cross-country skiing, reading, writing, sugar-free chocolate, and napping -- sometimes all on the same day!

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Tales from the Man Cave: “Man Maintenace,” because men need tune-ups too

A man is seeing his family physician.

Regular “man maintenance” can help you live a healthier life.

Every day, we seem to hear the same general suggestions about how to live healthy – don’t smoke, moderate your drinking, avoid drug use, eat healthy and live actively. But maybe, as we men age, we should add “get it checked out” and “talk to someone” to that list.

We think it’s common sense to see your family doctor if your health is distressing you, but common sense isn’t always common, especially when it comes to guys and their health. Remember, health is one of those things you might not think of until it’s too late. However, with a few well informed truths perhaps you can avoid some of the nasty issues that are out there, waiting in the wings.

“Getting it checked out.”

For young men, one step towards avoiding testicular cancer is a self-exam; however, your GP is your best bet if you aren’t sure and is definitely your next step if you think there may be an issue. As for us older fellas, in each successive decade of life there are other tests and checkups we should have done, like blood pressure, cholesterol, and the less pleasant prostate and colorectal screening. Once again, your GP is the best person to talk to about what’s right for you.

“Talk to someone.”

Stress is unavoidable in modern life – pressure at work, trouble with relationships, and our own expectations can all lead to increased levels of stress. What is a guy to do?

Well, let me suggest that any time is a good time to talk to someone about stress.

A few words with your significant other or a close friend may be all you need. However, if it persists or even worsens, then you may need to see a health care provider. Stress can affect your sleep, appetite, concentration, mood, and more.  These things can actually lead to the early development of disease and they are signs that it is time to see a professional. To say that managing stress is important is an understatement!

What are some things that can reduce stress and help us deal with it in healthy ways? That everyday advice we mentioned is a start: healthy diet, be physically active for 150 minutes a week, don’t smoke. Also, remember to be social, make sure you have a healthy work and life balance, get enough sleep, and practise relaxation. I find relaxation tapes help and information on mindfulness is plentiful on the web as well. All of these things will help you take small steps towards a healthier life.

What do you do to reduce stress in your life?

Jim Coyle

About Jim Coyle

Jim is a tobacco reduction coordinator with the men’s health program, and has a background in psychiatry and care of the elderly. In former times, Jim was director of care at Simon Fraser Lodge and clinical coordinator at the Brain Injury Group. He came to Canada from Glasgow, Scotland 20 years ago and, when not at work, Jim plays in the band Out of Alba and spends time with his family.

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