Healthy Living in the North

Telehealth: bridging the gap between physicians and patients

Dr. Abdulla smile in front of medical equipment.

Dr. Abdulla, one call away from a patient appointment. (photo credit: Prince George Citizen)

Telehealth is seeing growing usage in Northern Health, and patients and physicians are seeing the benefits.

“I had a lady sitting on her patio drinking coffee in Quesnel, and I did a followup with her [from Prince George],” said Dr. Abdulla. “That’s the ideal situation. She doesn’t have to drive an hour and 20 minutes each way for a seven-minute appointment.”

Dr. Abdulla is a urologist based out of UHNBC in Prince George who deals with patients from across the North. He knows the difficulty travel can pose for his patients and telehealth has helped them skip the trip, and still receive the quality of care they need.

Physicians can find out more about offering telehealth to your patients or clients at northernhealth.ca/services/programs/telehealth.

Mark Hendricks

About Mark Hendricks

Mark is the Communications Advisor, Medical Affairs at Northern Health. He was raised in Prince George, and has earned degrees from UNBC (International Business) and Thompson Rivers University (Journalism). As a fan of Fall and Winter, the North suits him and he’s happy to be home in Prince George. When he's not working, Mark enjoys spending time with his wife, reading, playing games of all sorts, hiking, and a good cup (or five) of coffee.

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The CNC Health and Wellness Centre: providing medical care to students, staff, and faculty

Behind a desk, one woman sits at a computer while another woman stands behind her, looking over her shoulder.

L-R: CNC Health and Wellness Centre Clinic Counsellor, Lacy Chabot and Medical Office Assistant, Connie Kragt reviewing the centre’s schedule.

Nestled by the dental wing, in the back corner of the College of New Caledonia’s (CNC) Prince George campus, is the Health and Wellness Centre. This inviting space is home to a medical office assistant, counsellor, physician, and two nurse practitioners. They offer medical care to students, staff, and faculty who walk through their doors.

Cheryl Dussault, a nurse practitioner, is one of the dedicated staff working at the centre.

“We provide the basic services required to meet our clients’ everyday health care needs,” says Cheryl. “Our focus is on health promotion, preventing illness, and managing chronic conditions. We have a counsellor on the team to provide mental health support to students.”

General practice physician Dr. Heather Smith is at the centre half a day per week.

“We are more than birth control, STI testing, and mental health services,” says Dr. Smith. “We deal with complex medical conditions including strokes, heart attacks, and neurological disorders. We are a full-service family practice with the same skills and abilities as other clinics.”

A team approach offers the right care by the right provider. Staff at the clinic work with other health care providers and the CNC community. This ensures students receive the appropriate care and contributes to student success.

The centre operates as a partnership between CNC and Northern Health. For more information on the CNC Health and Wellness Centre, visit their website.

Tamara Reichert

About Tamara Reichert

Tamara is the communications advisor for the innovation and development commons at Northern Health where she works on a number of projects with the research, quality improvement, clinical simulation, and education teams. Born and raised in Prince George, Tamara grew up on a ranch where she rode horses, played with farm animals, built forts, and raided the family garden. She enjoys spending time travelling, hiking, cooking, reading, and cheering for her favourite sports teams.

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Celebrating our Northern physicians

Physician residents in a simulated OR setting.

A group of residents participating in an OR simulation in Fort St. John.

Happy National Physician’s Day!

Join us on this day to recognize all the physicians who have contributed to the health of our Northern communities. We appreciate your commitment and dedication to your patients and the health of our families.

Please join us in thanking the physicians who work in the North!

A group of physicians sitting around a table.

A physician learning group sessions being hosted by Dr. Rob Olson, BC Cancer Centre for the North.

A group of people listening to a presentation.

Dr. Collin Phillips presenting at the 2019 Jasper Retreat and Medical Conference.

Sanja Knezevic

About Sanja Knezevic

Sanja is a communications advisor with Northern Health’s medical affairs department and is based in Prince George. She moved to Canada in 1995 from former Yugoslavia to Fort Nelson where she lived for a few years before moving to Prince George in 2000. Sanja enjoys photography, curling up with a good book, cooking and spending time with her friends and family.

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The Boon Docs: Excuses

The Boon Docs comic, "excuses," by Caroline Shooner, frame 1 of 3.

The Boon Docs comic, "excuses," by Caroline Shooner, frame 2 of 3.

The Boon Docs comic, "excuses," by Caroline Shooner, frame 3 of 3.

About the Boon Docs:

The Boon Docs is a comic about practicing medicine in a small town. It’s about raising chickens and having sheep instead of a lawnmower. It’s about being nice to your neighbours (or else). But don’t be fooled: it is not always simple or idyllic. There are hungry bears and peckish raccoons out there. Rumors get around faster than the ambulance, and the store often runs out of milk.

Caroline Shooner

About Caroline Shooner

Originally from Montreal, Dr. Caroline Shooner joined the Queen Charlotte medical team in 2007 and has been living and practicing as a family physician on Haida Gwaii ever since. Caroline is interested in how the arts and humanities can help promote health and allow us to look more critically and meaningfully at how we practice medicine. In 2015, she completed an MSc in Medical Humanities at King’s College London. During that year, she was introduced to the field of Graphic Medicine and started creating a series of cartoons inspired by the comic side of small town medicine: The Boon Docs.

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Prince Rupert radiologist Dr. Giles Stevenson presented with prestigious award

Headshot of Dr. Giles Stevenson.The Canadian Association of Radiology has presented Prince Rupert radiologist Dr. Giles Stevenson with the Distinguished Career Award, an award that honours individuals who have made significant contributions to radiology in Canada over the course of their careers.

Dr. Stevenson’s many accomplishments over his 42 year career in health care have been featured in an article by Canadian Healthcare Technology. His achievements include teaching medical students since 1976, authoring more than 100 peer-reviewed papers and 42 book chapters, winning multiple awards, and gaining international renown in his specialty.

Dr. Stevenson started in the Prince Rupert Regional Hospital in 2007 and recently retired in December 2018. He says that the hospital in Prince Rupert was a “wonderfully friendly hospital to work in, with terrific staff and a warm and supportive atmosphere. It always felt like a privilege to be part of it.”

Please join Northern Health in congratulating Dr. Stevenson on his service to our Northern communities!

Sanja Knezevic

About Sanja Knezevic

Sanja is a communications advisor with Northern Health’s medical affairs department and is based in Prince George. She moved to Canada in 1995 from former Yugoslavia to Fort Nelson where she lived for a few years before moving to Prince George in 2000. Sanja enjoys photography, curling up with a good book, cooking and spending time with her friends and family.

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The Boon Docs: No Trespassing

Boon Docs comic, "no trespassing," by Caroline Shooner.
The Boon Docs comic, “no trespassing,” by Dr. Caroline Shooner.

About the Boon Docs:

The Boon Docs is a comic about practicing medicine in a small town. It’s about raising chickens and having sheep instead of a lawnmower. It’s about being nice to your neighbours (or else). But don’t be fooled: it is not always simple or idyllic. There are hungry bears and peckish raccoons out there. Rumors get around faster than the ambulance, and the store often runs out of milk.

Caroline Shooner

About Caroline Shooner

Originally from Montreal, Dr. Caroline Shooner joined the Queen Charlotte medical team in 2007 and has been living and practicing as a family physician on Haida Gwaii ever since. Caroline is interested in how the arts and humanities can help promote health and allow us to look more critically and meaningfully at how we practice medicine. In 2015, she completed an MSc in Medical Humanities at King’s College London. During that year, she was introduced to the field of Graphic Medicine and started creating a series of cartoons inspired by the comic side of small town medicine: The Boon Docs.

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Local physician recognized for an innovative workplace culture

Garry Knoll standing in front of a lake in the woods.

Dr. Garry Knoll was recently recognized by the BC Patient Safety & Quality Council with the Quality Culture Trailblazer Award.

Local Prince George family physician Dr. Garry Knoll was recently honoured by the BC Patient Safety & Quality Council, winning an award for Quality Culture Trailblazer. Dr. Knoll is the President, Board Chair, and Physician Lead of the Prince George Division of Family Practice, and has been a family physician for over 35 years. He was recognized for creating a culture of quality improvement where staff are empowered and encouraged to innovate.

He has transformed care in Prince George by helping implement a renowned practice coaching program, championing team-based care and primary care homes, and supporting physician recruitment and retention. He is a leader, role model and mentor to many, caring for his patients in the hospital, visiting long-term care patients, and providing palliative care in his practice and at the Prince George Hospice House.

Dr. Knoll mentors new family physicians in Prince George through his role as a clinical assistant professor with the UBC Family Medicine Residency Program, where he is known for emphasizing the importance of person-centred care, and by recruiting them to join his practice.

Although he is nearing retirement, Dr. Knoll continues to work tirelessly to improve care practices, ensuring the legacy of his work will inspire health care providers in years to come. He will receive his award February 2019 during a reception at the Quality Forum 2019 in Vancouver.

Tamara Reichert

About Tamara Reichert

Tamara is the communications advisor for the innovation and development commons at Northern Health where she works on a number of projects with the research, quality improvement, clinical simulation, and education teams. Born and raised in Prince George, Tamara grew up on a ranch where she rode horses, played with farm animals, built forts, and raided the family garden. She enjoys spending time travelling, hiking, cooking, reading, and cheering for her favourite sports teams.

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Tumbler Ridge physician makes 33rd appearance in long-running journal feature

Canadian Journal of Rural Medicine cover, in which Dr. Helm has an article.Dr. Charles Helm, who practices in Tumbler Ridge in Northern BC, is the author of “Country Cardiograms case 64” in the Canadian Journal of Rural Medicine’s Fall 2018 issue. The recurring feature presents an electrocardiogram and invites readers to make a diagnosis, letting readers pit their skills against those of the physician author. This is Dr. Helm’s 33rd publication under “Country Cardiograms” — congratulations to Dr. Helm!

Anne Scott

About Anne Scott

Anne is a communications officer at Northern Health; she lives in Prince George with her husband Andrew Watkinson. Her current health goals are to do a pull-up and more than one consecutive “real” push-up. She also dreams of becoming a master’s level competitive sprinter and finding a publisher for her children’s book on colourblindness. Anne enjoys cycling, cross-country skiing, reading, writing, sugar-free chocolate, and napping -- sometimes all on the same day!

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Tales from the Man Cave: “Man Maintenace,” because men need tune-ups too

A man is seeing his family physician.

Regular “man maintenance” can help you live a healthier life.

Every day, we seem to hear the same general suggestions about how to live healthy – don’t smoke, moderate your drinking, avoid drug use, eat healthy and live actively. But maybe, as we men age, we should add “get it checked out” and “talk to someone” to that list.

We think it’s common sense to see your family doctor if your health is distressing you, but common sense isn’t always common, especially when it comes to guys and their health. Remember, health is one of those things you might not think of until it’s too late. However, with a few well informed truths perhaps you can avoid some of the nasty issues that are out there, waiting in the wings.

“Getting it checked out.”

For young men, one step towards avoiding testicular cancer is a self-exam; however, your GP is your best bet if you aren’t sure and is definitely your next step if you think there may be an issue. As for us older fellas, in each successive decade of life there are other tests and checkups we should have done, like blood pressure, cholesterol, and the less pleasant prostate and colorectal screening. Once again, your GP is the best person to talk to about what’s right for you.

“Talk to someone.”

Stress is unavoidable in modern life – pressure at work, trouble with relationships, and our own expectations can all lead to increased levels of stress. What is a guy to do?

Well, let me suggest that any time is a good time to talk to someone about stress.

A few words with your significant other or a close friend may be all you need. However, if it persists or even worsens, then you may need to see a health care provider. Stress can affect your sleep, appetite, concentration, mood, and more.  These things can actually lead to the early development of disease and they are signs that it is time to see a professional. To say that managing stress is important is an understatement!

What are some things that can reduce stress and help us deal with it in healthy ways? That everyday advice we mentioned is a start: healthy diet, be physically active for 150 minutes a week, don’t smoke. Also, remember to be social, make sure you have a healthy work and life balance, get enough sleep, and practise relaxation. I find relaxation tapes help and information on mindfulness is plentiful on the web as well. All of these things will help you take small steps towards a healthier life.

What do you do to reduce stress in your life?

Jim Coyle

About Jim Coyle

Jim is a tobacco reduction coordinator with the men’s health program, and has a background in psychiatry and care of the elderly. In former times, Jim was director of care at Simon Fraser Lodge and clinical coordinator at the Brain Injury Group. He came to Canada from Glasgow, Scotland 20 years ago and, when not at work, Jim plays in the band Out of Alba and spends time with his family.

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