Healthy Living in the North

Supporting healthy community development at the NCLGA Convention

NH staff posing at their trade show booth at the NCLGA Conference.

L-R: Jeff Kormos, Healthy Settings Advisor; Dr. Sandra Allison, NH Chief Medical Health Officer; and Holly Hughes, Healthy Settings Advisor; at the NCLGA Conference trade show booth they co-hosted with Interior Health staff.

Northern Health (NH) and Interior Health (IH) joined forces this week to share information about healthy communities at this year’s North Central Local Government Association Convention in Williams Lake.

NH and IH co-hosted the pre-conference event, “Resilient & Healthy Communities,” the 4th annual Northern Healthy Communities Forum. The event is an opportunity for health authority staff to engage with elected officials from 100 Mile House and everything North.

“We are sharing resources for local governments to support them to develop healthy policies and address community health needs in their communities across the North,” said Holly Hughes, Healthy Settings Advisor. “Community needs vary with respect to health and we have brought contact information, tools, and resources to support local action.”

Dr. Allison on stage, next to her presentation on Opioids and our Communities.

Mayors and Councillors had the opportunity to hear Dr. Sandra Allison, NH Chief Medical Health Officer, talk about the opioid response in the North.

Jessica Quinn

About Jessica Quinn

Jessica Quinn is the regional manager of digital communications and public engagement for Northern Health, where she is actively involved in promoting the great work of NH staff to encourage healthy, well and active lifestyles. She manages NH's content channels, including social media (Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, etc). When she's not working, Jessica stays active by exploring the beautiful outdoors around Prince George via kayak, hiking boots, or snowshoes, and she has recently completed her master's degree in professional communications from Royal Roads University, with a focus on the use of social media in health care. (NH Blog Admin)

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Devote time and energy to mental wellness

Graphic reading: How do you really feel?

Like physical wellness, it is important to devote time and energy to developing your mental wellness. What can you do to foster mental wellness each and every day?

For me, one of the exciting things I’ve seen when we’re talking about health is the increased attention on wellness and protective factors, instead of solely on disease and symptoms.

It’s no surprise that this extends to the field of mental health and mental wellness.

This year, for Mental Health Week (May 4-10, 2015), I would encourage you to give some thought to the things that keep you healthy mentally. Similar to physical wellness being more than the absence of disease, mental wellness is a state of well-being. What it looks like for you might be different than what it looks like for me, but the important part is that we dedicate time and energy to keeping ourselves well.

I’ve gotten better at recognizing when I am not doing enough to support my wellness: I am quicker to become irritated, I start to notice some physical symptoms from stress, and I am generally not a whole lot of fun to be around. These are indications for me that it might be time to take some affirmative action. Personally, I know that I sometimes need to give myself some extra time on the drive home to process after a difficult day of work. I also need to maintain my healthy sleep habits. Regular exercise is also important for my mental wellness.

Another similarity between mental and physical wellness relates to coping tools or what may be referred to as “resiliency factors.” If we have a large range of these tools, even if we do become unwell, we may be sick for less time or not get as sick as we otherwise would. Visit the Canadian Mental Health Association for a self-assessment and some tips on resilience.

Another way that we can enhance our mental wellness is by opening the dialogue about mental health. By having a week to increase attention on mental health, we can address one of the most pervasive things that impedes mental wellness: stigma. Negative attitudes, beliefs, and actions spread misinformation and fear about mental health issues.

The bottom line is that mental illness may affect any one of us over the course of our lives, so let’s do what we can to support one another and help increase the overall level of knowledge and inclusiveness in our home, work, and social environments. To learn more about reducing stigma, visit the Mental Health Commission of Canada.

Nick Rempel

About Nick Rempel

Nick Rempel is the clinical educator for Mental Health and Addictions, northwest B.C. Nick has lived in northern B.C. his entire life and received his education from the University of Northern BC with a degree in nursing. He enjoys playing music, going to the gym, and watching movies in his spare time.

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