Healthy Living in the North

Foodie Friday: Tips for great-tasting fish!

Maple Dijon salmon on a plate with vegetable and rice.

There are so many reasons to love salmon! It’s local, heart-healthy, and packed with nutrients! Registered dietitian Amy’s maple Dijon salmon is a great way to enjoy it!

I love salmon! I love that salmon is a local, B.C. food. I love that I can buy salmon at a fish market and know where it comes from. And, if I had the skills to go fishing, I love that I could fish for salmon, too, like many B.C. residents and visitors enjoy doing.

Originally, I come from the Prairies. Along with the fact that my mother had a fish allergy and the fact that we lived over 2,000 km from the nearest coastline, my first real taste of fresh salmon was just three years ago when my husband and I moved to B.C. It was unbelievably delicious! I couldn’t believe I had been missing out all these years!

Why fish?

Did you know that Canada’s Food Guide recommends 2 servings of fish per week for people of all ages? One serving equals around 1/2 cup of fish – or approximately the size and thickness of the palm of your hand.

Fish is an excellent source of protein, is low in saturated fat, and contains omega-3 essential fatty acids and many other nutrients that the body needs.

Omega-3 fats are “essential fats” because they cannot be made in the body and must be provided in the diet. Omega-3 fats:

  • Help with brain, nerve and eye development in infants
  • Can help prevent and treat heart disease
  • May help reduce symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis
  • May help in the prevention of dementia including Alzheimer’s disease

Are you looking to enjoy this healthy and delicious protein? Here are two tips for great tasting fish!

  1. Make sure your fish is fresh. Cook it the same day you buy it or, if it’s frozen, thaw in the fridge overnight and cook the next day. Your fish should not smell “fishy.”
  2. Don’t overcook the fish or it gets dry and tough. If using a pan, fish only needs about 10 minutes per inch. If cooking in the oven, a little more time is needed – about 15 minutes, until it flakes apart with a fork and is fairly firm in the middle.

For more information about cooking fish, I recommend The Fresh Market’s tip & tricks.

Have I sold you on salmon yet? Try it tonight with this maple Dijon salmon recipe! This recipe is simple, easy, and delicious for a weeknight meal but also fancy enough for company. Using maple syrup makes it a very Canadian inspired recipe, too. Enjoy this with a side of brown rice or other whole grain and a hot vegetable or salad.

Maple Dijon Salmon

Ingredients

  • 1 fillet of salmon (1-2 pounds) or 4-6 frozen pieces of plain, unseasoned salmon
  • 1-2 tbsp Dijon mustard (grainy or smooth)
  • 1-2 tbsp maple syrup
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 F. Line a large baking sheet with parchment paper (for easy clean up).
  2. Sprinkle the fish evenly with salt and pepper.
  3. Mix together mustard and maple syrup in a bowl. Spread on top of the salmon, sprinkle with a little more salt and fresh ground pepper if desired! If you have time to let it marinate, let it sit covered in the fridge for 2 hours, but this isn’t necessary.
  4. Bake in preheated oven for about 15-20 minutes, depending on how thick the fish fillets are. You want your fish flaky but not tough.
Amy Horrock

About Amy Horrock

Born and raised in Winnipeg Manitoba, Amy Horrock is a registered dietitian and member of the Regional Dysphagia Management Team. She loves cooking, blogging, and spreading the joy of healthy eating to others! Outside of the kitchen, this prairie girl can be found crocheting, reading, or exploring the natural splendor and soaring heights of British Columbia with her husband!

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Foodie Friday: Salmon and a celebration of Indigenous heritage, cultures, and foods

Canned salmon

Salmon can be prepared and enjoyed in so many ways. It is delicious and nutritious!

Salmon, salmon, salmon … so delicious and nutritious! Canned, fried, baked, dried, smoked, candied, pickled … the possibilities are endless! My mouth is watering just thinking about it. Salmon fishing season is approaching for many people across northern B.C. and my partner has been preparing for weeks. Last weekend he brought home our first spring salmon of the year from the Skeena River.

A fishing net along the Skeena River - where Victoria's partner recently caught his first spring salmon of the year!

A fishing net along the Skeena River – where Victoria’s partner recently caught his first spring salmon of the year!

Not only is salmon so delicious, it’s also very nutritious. It’s high in omega-3 fatty acids that help protect against strokes and heart disease. When eating canned salmon, be sure to mash up the bones as they are a good source of calcium, making our bones and teeth strong. Salmon is an excellent source of vitamin D, which is important in keeping our bones strong as well as protecting us from arthritis and cancer. Salmon meat, skin, head and eggs also provide protein and B vitamins.

Mother and daughter in a selfie

Fishing for salmon can be a family affair! Victoria and her daughter spend quality time together watching her partner fish! Photo by Hannah Litkw Stewart.

Salmon has been a staple food of coastal First Nations since time immemorial. Aboriginal Day is June 21 and is a great opportunity to celebrate Indigenous heritage, cultures, and foods. Some events even include salmon! For example, Saaynangaa Naay-Skidegate Health Centre is hosting Haida games, storytelling and a salmon meal! Gitlaxt’aamiks is hosting a soapberry ice cream contest and fish preparation contests. Check out an Aboriginal Day event in your area, including over 100 Day of Wellness events supported by the First Nations Health Authority! Find an event in your community and come out and celebrate Aboriginal Day!

Want to add salmon to your menu? Baked salmon is a great treat. Here is one of my favorite baked salmon recipes to try:

Dilled Salmon

Ingredients

  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • Dash black pepper
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • ½ teaspoon dried dill
  • 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
  • 1 tablespoon maple syrup
  • 2 (6 oz) salmon fillets

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 400 F.
  2. In a small bowl, combine garlic, oil, salt, pepper, lemon juice, dill, mustard and syrup.
  3. Place fillets in a medium glass baking dish and cover with the marinade.
  4. Cover with aluminum foil and bake for 20 minutes/inch or until cooked through and easily flaked with a fork. Do not overcook.

Enjoy!

Victoria Carter

About Victoria Carter

Victoria works in Northern Health's Aboriginal health program as the lead for engagement and integration. She is an adopted member of the Nisga’a nation and was given the name “Nox Aama Goot” which means “mother of good heart.” In her work she sees herself as an ally working together with Aboriginal people across the north to improve access to quality health care. She keeps herself well by honouring the mental, emotional, physical and spiritual aspects of her life through spending time with her friends and family, being in nature and working on her own personal growth.

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Foodie Friday: Tried and true family recipes

Recipe card for salmon loaf

Marianne’s mom’s well-used recipe card is a copy of her own mother’s recipe. What tried and true recipes have your family passed down?

I am an avid cookbook collector. It all started when I was 12 and my parents gave me a cream cheese cookbook for Christmas and it just kept growing from there! My culinary library has expanded to include pretty much any cuisine, cooking technique, or food you can think of. And while I love to experiment with these recipes, I still have a special place in my heart for those tried and true family recipes handed down to me from my parents and grandparents.

I have many fond memories that involve food and family. Memories like spending afternoons stuffing and folding perogies with Grandma and Grandpa Bloudoff in their little East Vancouver kitchen, enjoying them for lunch along with my grandpa’s Doukhobor borscht, then taking home bags of those perogies and jars full of soup. Or all the canning and preserves that my mom, my uncle, and my grandpa would make – peaches, apricots, and cherries from the Okanagan, green beans grown in my uncle’s garden, and the best sweet pickle mix you have ever tasted. And I can’t forget all of the side dishes that make it into every family holiday meal!

I’m grateful for all of the recipes and cooking skills that were passed on to me. Sharing food traditions is a huge part of forming connections with family, friends, and culture. It’s also an important part of healthy eating and having a healthy relationship with food. It’s something that I draw from not only in my own personal life, but also as a dietitian.

One of my favourite family recipes comes from my mom’s mom – salmon loaf. When my mom was a kid, they would make salmon loaf from salmon that my grandpa had caught and canned himself. I now make it with canned salmon from the store because I am no fisherwoman. It makes a great, easy weeknight meal paired with some steamed rice and your favourite vegetables. Try it out instead of meatloaf one night – it might just become a new family tradition for you, too.

Salmon loaf on a plate

Try Marianne’s family’s tried and true salmon loaf recipe with some rice and veggies for an easy and delicious weeknight meal!

Salmon Loaf

Serves 4 – 6

Ingredients

  • 2 cans (213 g) salmon (sockeye, pink, or other)
  • 6 – 7 soda crackers, crumbled
  • 1 tsp lemon juice
  • 3 tbsp milk
  • 1 tbsp melted butter
  • pepper to taste
  • 2 eggs

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees F.
  2. Mix all ingredients, except eggs.
  3. Beat eggs until fluffy, then fold into mixture.
  4. Spread mixture into small loaf pan.
  5. Bake for 45 minutes, or until golden and crispy on top.

Tip: Canned sockeye salmon is great in this recipe, but can be expensive. Choose canned pink salmon for a more budget-friendly – but equally delicious – version.

Tip: Add fresh or dried herbs like dill, parsley, or basil, or some chopped green onion to change up the flavour.

Marianne Bloudoff

About Marianne Bloudoff

Born and raised in BC, Marianne moved from Vancouver to Prince George in January 2014. She is a Registered Dietitian with Northern Health's population health team. Her passion for food and nutrition lured her away from her previous career in Fisheries Management. Now, instead of counting fish, she finds herself educating people on their health benefits. In her spare time, Marianne can be found experimenting in the kitchen and writing about it on her food blog, as well as exploring everything northern B.C. has to offer.

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