Healthy Living in the North

Clinical simulation helps nursing school instructors provide better training

Simulation Debriefing Training Workshop Facilitators and Attendees.
Simulation Debriefing Training Workshop Facilitators and Attendees. L – R: Michael Lundin, Coordinator, Northern Clinical Simulation, Northern Health and Workshop Facilitator; Jasit (Joey) Johal, CNC Instructor, Quesnel Campus; Suzanne Betts, CNC Instructor, Prince George Campus; Shelby Montgomery, CNC Instructor, Prince George Campus; Danielle Brandon, CNC Instructor, Prince George Campus; Stacey Conway, CNC Instructor, Prince George Campus; Lyndsy McFadden, Yvonne Mott, CNC Instructor, Prince George Campus; Tara Green, CNC Instructor, Prince George Campus; Lizann Schultz, CNC Instructor, Quesnel Campus; Liza Voliente, CNC Instructor, Prince George Campus; Nancy Esopenko, CNC Instructor, Prince George Campus; Anita Muchalla Yeulet, CNC Instructor, Prince George Campus; Tanya Barrett, Clinical Nurse Educator, Northern Health and Workshop Facilitator; Crystal Patenaude, CNC Instructor, Prince George Campus; Renee Peterson, CNC Instructor, Quesnel Campus.

For health sciences students, clinical simulation is an important part of learning. It lets them practice on realistic mannequins known as simulators without risk to patients. And of course, their instructors’ knowledge of simulation techniques is key.

On January 11, Northern Health’s Clinical Simulation Program hosted 16 nursing instructors from the College of New Caledonia (CNC) for a simulation training session.

The all-day session took place at the University Hospital of Northern British Columbia (UHNBC) in Prince George, and instructors from CNC’s Prince George and Quesnel campuses participated.

The training focused on the debriefing part of simulation education. This is when the instructor and students discuss the simulation session after it’s over, discussing what went well and areas for improvement. This is the first time a debriefing workshop has been offered by Northern Clinical Simulation.

“This session is part of the evolution of simulation use in year 2 at the CNC campuses,” says Nancy Esopenko, a CNC instructor in the Northern Collaborative Baccalaureate Nursing Program. “In 2018 we began a pilot project for students around simulation. We wanted everyone to take part in simulation during their medical or surgical rotations at UHNBC and GR Baker Hospital in Quesnel. Before this, the students’ exposure to simulation varied. We wanted all our students to learn using simulation.”

By taking this training, instructors are increasing their knowledge around simulation. This makes the sessions with students even more valuable.

“Debriefing is a very important part of simulation training and overall learning. It enhances the experience for both instructors and students. This training has given our instructors the tools to have difficult conversations,” says Nancy, who’s also Year 1 & 2 Coordinator in the nursing program. “It was very valuable to watch experienced instructors word their questions. We appreciated the chance to practice before teaching students.”

The experience has been beneficial for both new and experienced instructors: “They’re more confident in their approach and communication style,” says Nancy. “All the instructors learned new ways to engage in conversations and provide feedback. They liked playing the student role during the simulation scenarios, too – it let them see things from the student perspective.”

The commitment shown by the CNC instructors in taking part in these workshops will a go a long way in training future nurses for years to come.

Tamara Reichert

About Tamara Reichert

Tamara is the communications advisor for the innovation and development commons at Northern Health where she works on a number of projects with the research, quality improvement, clinical simulation, and education teams. Born and raised in Prince George, Tamara grew up on a ranch where she rode horses, played with farm animals, built forts, and raided the family garden. She enjoys spending time travelling, hiking, cooking, reading, and cheering for her favourite sports teams.

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Food and Fun: Building Healthy Relationships in the Kitchen

This month, we’re celebrating Nutrition Month, and this year’s theme, “Unlock the Potential of Food.” Food offers so much, including the potential for us to discover new tastes, skills, and experiences, as well as the potential to bring us together.

little girl mixing bowl with spoon.

Cooking with kids is so much fun!

My daughter recently had her second birthday, and she’s already a budding chef! She will declare, “I want to cook,” and proceed to push a chair to the kitchen counter, ask for exactly two bowls, a big spoon, and “more spices please.” She then mixes things together, perhaps adds a little water, decants from one bowl to the other, and, yes, makes a bit of a mess.

At other times, she “helps” me with a recipe. She has stirred the dry ingredients together for apple crisp and has “beaten” eggs for homemade muffins. Of course, I help her to “help” me.

Why do I support these messy kitchen adventures? Is it because it keeps her happily occupied for a few minutes so I can get something else done? Well, yes…but I also have ulterior motives….

Children are exposed to the world of food through the role modeling, attitudes, and habits of their families, friends, caregivers, and educators. Cooking with kids can help to build a foundation for healthy relationships with food. How is this?

  • “I want to cook!” Cooking together supports positive attitudes about food and eating. Food is a pleasure, and food preparation can be fun.
  • “What’s dis, mama?” Food preparation activities help kids get familiar and comfortable with a greater variety of foods. And this, in turn, helps them to (eventually) enjoy a variety of food.
  • “Me cook!” Cooking teaches food skills. At this age, cooking with kids helps to normalize the fact that we can make tasty dishes from simple ingredients. This builds their confidence that they will eventually be able to do this too.

 The child feels independent and it’s kind of a milestone…They think: OK, if I can do this, if I can just mix this, then I can do that too. It’s baby steps towards bigger things.”

 ~ Mother*

Cooking with kids helps to build their lifelong relationship with food, and it’s also important in the “here and now.” Time in the kitchen is quality time, a way to connect, an investment in adult-child relationships. And cooking together is not only fun for the kids – it’s rewarding for adults too:

It’s something we can do together; they get excited about it and it makes me feel good.”

~ Father*

What opportunity do you have to cook with kids? Wondering where to start? Consider taking a peek at our Cooking with Kids poster to see what children of various ages are capable of doing in the kitchen. You might also enjoy kids’ cooking videos from the annual “Hands-On Cook-Off contest” (or consider submitting a video yourself!).

You can also find more inspiration on our blog:

(*Quotes from “A Hands on Approach to Family, Food and Fun”.)

Lise Luppens

About Lise Luppens

Lise is a registered dietitian with Northern Health's regional Population Health team, where her work focuses on nutrition in the early years. She is passionate about supporting children's innate eating capabilities and the development of lifelong eating competence. Her passion for food extends beyond her work, and her young family enjoys cooking, local foods, and lazy gardening. In her free time, you might also find her exploring beautiful northwest BC by foot, ski, kayak or kite.

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